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Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities 2001-2002 A Year In Review SDFSC Annual State Conference February 10, 2003 Karyn Gukeisen State Coordinator-SDFSC Texas Education Agency Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

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slide1

Safe and Drug-Free

Schools and Communities

slide2

2001-2002

A Year In

Review

slide3

SDFSC Annual State Conference

February 10, 2003

Karyn Gukeisen

State Coordinator-SDFSC

Texas Education Agency

safe and drug free schools and communities
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2001-2002 SDFSC Annual Evaluation and 2002 Texas Schools Survey
  • NCLB Updates
  • Private School Participation
  • Some Things Never Change
  • New Data Collection Requirements
  • Resources and Grant Winners
safe and drug free schools and communities5
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2001-02 SDFSC Annual Evaluation and 2002 Texas Schools Survey
slide6

2001-2002 SDFSC

Annual Evaluation

Results!!!

slide7

Texas

Incidents on School Property

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

1999-002000-012001-02

Elementary 157,791 190,752 179,537

MS/JH 477,609 589,724 590,145

High School 478,240 585,422 567,482

slide8

Texas

Weapons-related Incidents

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

1999-002000-012001-02

Elementary 787 592 350

MS/JH 1,224 1,535 1,291

High School 1,103 1,691 3,494

slide9

Victims*

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

Elementary

1999-002000-012001-02

Students 7,284 5,940 7,665

Non-Students 598 679 622

Non-School 245 262 95

Unknown 3,844 3,125 3,351

*The recipient of a criminal act, usually used in relation to personal crimes. (USDE)

slide10

Victims*

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

Middle/Jr. High

1999-002000-012001-02

Students 15,102 19,621 11,370

Non-Students 1,924 1,517 2,806

Non-School 628 595 257

Unknown 10,689 10,553 17,039

*The recipient of a criminal act, usually used in relation to personal crimes. (USDE)

slide11

Victims*

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

High School

1999-002000-012001-02

Students 13,995 12,421 10,074

Non-Students 1,545 1,421 1,152

Non-School 350 595 257

Unknown 9,714 7,871 13,987

*The recipient of a criminal act, usually used in relation to personal crimes. (USDE)

slide12

Offenders*

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

Elementary

1999-002000-012001-02

Students 73,991 100,158 96,728

Non-Students 48 99 646

Unknown 18 18 11

*An individual, whether student or not, involved in committing an incident of prohibited behavior. There may be more than one offender involved in any single incident. (USDE)

slide13

Offenders*

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

Middle/Jr. High

1999-002000-012001-02

Students 211,180 285,507 269,727

Non-Students 117 216 1,972

Unknown 13 46 4

*An individual, whether student or not, involved in committing an incident of prohibited behavior. There may be more than one offender involved in any single incident. (USDE)

slide14

Offenders*

SDFSC Annual Evaluation Report

High School

1999-00 2000-012001-02

Students 201,223 280,534 251,211

Non-Students 196 129 2,289

Unknown 57 349 697

*An individual, whether student or not, involved in committing an incident of prohibited behavior. There may be more than one offender involved in any single incident. (USDE)

slide16

Texas School Survey

http://www.tcada.state.tx.us/

From the

Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse

slide17

Alcohol Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2002

Texas School Survey-2000

slide19

Marijuana Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2002

Texas School Survey-2000

slide21

Tobacco Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2000

Texas School Survey-2000

slide22

Tobacco Use by Texas Elementary Students

Grades 4-6

Texas School Survey-2000

slide23

Inhalant Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2002

Texas School Survey-2000

slide24

Inhalant Use by Texas Elementary Students

Grades 4-6

Texas School Survey-2000

slide25

Cocaine/Crack Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2002

Texas School Survey-2000

slide26

Ecstacy Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2002

Texas School Survey-2000

slide27

Steroid Use by Texas Secondary Students

1990-2000

Texas School Survey-2000

safe and drug free schools and communities30
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2000-01 SDFSC Annual Evaluation
  • NCLB Updates
slide32

FY 2002 Appropriation

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

SDFSC State Grants $439,250,000

($439,250,000—2000)

National Programs $205,000,000

(Includes the Safe Schools, Healthy

Students’ Initiative and the

Middle School Coordinators Grants)

Total $644,250,000

slide33

FY 2002 Appropriation

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

Texas Allocation

$36,534,992

(increase of $1,537,891)

Texas Education Agency

$29,227,994

(Increase of $1,230,314)

Governor’s Office

$7,306,998

sdfsc entitlements 93 to leas
NCLB

40% based on enrollment

60% based on prior year Title I, Part A, and

SDFSC Entitlements93% to LEAs
sdfsc entitlements 93 to leas35
NCLB

No greatest need entitlement

SDFSC Entitlements93% to LEAs
new fiscal requirements
New Fiscal Requirements
  • Administrative Costs: No more than 2% of the current year entitlement;

Administrative costs include both direct administrative costs and indirect costs.

Indirect administrative costs include costs associated with human resources,

budgeting, accounting, purchasing, and other fiscal activities such as auditing.

new fiscal requirements37
New Fiscal Requirements

Salaries and benefits of staff that supervise program staff are part of the LEA’s direct

administrative costs.

34 CFR 80.3 states: administrative requirements mean those matters common to

grants in general, such as financial management, kinds and frequency of reports, and

retention of records.

new fiscal requirements38
New Fiscal Requirements

These are distinguished from programmatic requirements, which

concern matters that can be treated only on a program-by-program or grant-by-grant

basis, such as kinds of activities that can be supported by grants under a particular

Administration is administering programs and activities designed to enhance the

effective and coordinated use of program funds such as—

new fiscal requirements39
New Fiscal Requirements

• Coordination of programs with other federal and non-federal programs;

• Administration of programs;

• Dissemination of information regarding model programs and practices;

• Technical assistance; and

• Training personnel engaged in audit and other monitoring activities.

[Title IX, Part B, Section 9201]

new fiscal requirements40
New Fiscal Requirements
  • Supplement, Not Supplant: Funds used for SDFSC programs and activities will be used to supplement State, local and other non-Federal funds, and in no case supplant such funds;
new fiscal requirements41
New Fiscal Requirements
  • Security Costs:

Expanded to maximum of 40% of LEA grant, but only if hiring and training of security personnel is included;

- cap remains at 20% for security hardware, reporting crimes, school safety planning, etc.

consultation
Consultation
  • No SDFSC Advisory Committee for LEAs by name; however, LEAs must conduct on-going consultation with people representing the following groups:
consultation43
Consultation
  • State and local government representatives;
  • Representatives of schools to be served (including private schools);
  • Teachers and other staff;
  • Parents;
  • Students;
  • Community-based organizations;
consultation44
Consultation

Others with relevant and demonstrated expertise in drug and violence prevention activities such as:

*Medical

*Mental health

*Law enforcement

areas of on going consultation
Areas Of On-Going Consultation
  • Developing and designing a program;
  • Assessing or evaluating the violence and illegal drug use in schools;
  • Establishing a set of performance measures;
  • Ensuring programs and activities are scientifically based;
areas of on going consultation46
Areas Of On-Going Consultation
  • Ensuring programs or activities are based on an analysis of the prevalence of risk factors, protective factors, or other variables;
  • Ensuring consultation and input from parents in the development of SAS and administration of the programs and activities;
areas of on going consultation47
Areas Of On-Going Consultation
  • Designing and developing programs and activities including efforts to meet the Principles of Effectiveness.
1 assessment
1. Assessment
  • Based on an assessment of objective data regarding the incidence of violence and illegal drug use in the schools and communities to be served;
assessment
Assessment
  • This assessment must include an objective analysis of the current conditions and consequences regarding violence and illegal drug use that is based on ongoing local assessment or evaluation activities;
assessment51
Assessment
  • Analysis of the conditions and consequences must include delinquency and serious discipline problems among students who attend such schools (including private school students who participate in the drug and violence prevention program).
examples
Examples
  • PEIMS 425 Record data www.tea.state.tx.us/safe. Click on Annual DAEP Evaluation and Discipline Data Reports. Then click on Data Reports;
  • SDFSC Evaluation results;
  • Gun Free Schools Report data;
  • Local survey data; and
  • Analysis of school and community risk and protective factors.
2 performance measures
2. Performance Measures
  • Based on performance measures aimed at ensuring that these schools and communities have a safe, orderly, and drug-free learning environment;
reminder
Reminder!

TEA will be releasing its State Performance Measures in the Spring. You may want to align your performance measures to these State measures.

3 scientifically based research
3. Scientifically-Based Research
  • Grounded in scientifically based research that provides evidence that the program to be used will reduce violence and illegal drug use;
definition of scientifically based research
Definition of Scientifically Based Research

Definition of Scientifically Based Research can be found:

  • Title IX General Provisions, Section 9101 of NCLB (www.tea.state.tx.us/nclb)
definition of scientifically based research57
Definition of Scientifically Based Research
  • Page 12 (Q14) of the draft Guidance for SDFSC from the USDE (www.tea.state.tx.us/nclb. Click on USDE Guidance.)
  • Appendix 14 of the Instructions for completing the SAS-A200-03 www.tea.state.tx.us/student.support. Click on Student Support Programs. Then click on SAS Forms. Scroll down until you find Appendix 14.
slide59

USDE Expert Panel Results

  • Promising Programs
  • Thirty-three Promising Programs
  • Two from Texas
  • Exemplary Programs
  • Nine Programs
  • Exemplary & Promising Safe, Disciplined, and Drug-Free Schools Programs 2001
  • 1-877-433-7827
  • http://www.ed.gov/offices/OSDFS/expert_panel/drug-free.
  • html
example of model programs
Example of Model Programs
  • SAMHSA Model Programs: Model Prevention Programs Supporting Academic Achievement at http://modelprograms.samhsa.gov
4 prevalence of risk factors protective factors buffers assets or other variables
4. Prevalence of “Risk Factors, Protective Factors, Buffers, Assets, or Other Variables”

Based on an analysis (of data reasonably available at the time) of the prevalence of:

  • Risk factors, including high or increasing rates of reported cases of child abuse and domestic violence;
prevalence of risk factors protective factors buffers assets or other variables
Prevalence of “Risk Factors, Protective Factors, Buffers, Assets, or Other Variables”
  • Protective factors, buffers, assets;
  • Or other factors identified through scientifically based research that occur in schools and communities.
resources on child abuse and family violence statistics
Resources on Child Abuse and Family Violence Statistics
  • Child abuse statistics per county can be found at: www.tdprs.state.tx.us/Child_Protection/About_Child_Protective_Services/childfacts.asp
  • Domestic and family violence statistics can be found in The Texas Crime Report located at: www.txdps.state.tx.us. Click on General Information, and then Crime Statistics.
risk and protective factors
Risk factors are attitudes behaviors, beliefs, situations, or actions that may put a group, organization, individual, or community at risk for alcohol and drug problems.

Protective factors are attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, situations, or actions that build resilience in a group, organization, individual, or community.

Risk and Protective Factors*

*2000 Annual Summary: Effective Prevention Principles and

Programs. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

5 parents
5. Parents
  • Include meaningful and ongoing consultation with and input from parents in the development of the application and administration of the program or activity.
new requirement for annual sdfsc evaluation 2002 03
New Requirement ForAnnual SDFSC Evaluation2002-03
  • Includes a description of how parents were informed of, and participated in, violence and drug prevention efforts.
principles of effectiveness reminder
Principles of Effectiveness Reminder!!!!
  • Evaluated periodically against locally selected performance measures and modified over time (based on the evaluation) to refine, improve, and strengthen the program;
  • Shall be made available to the pubic upon request.
requirements in sas
Requirements InSAS
  • LEA’s SDFSC services must be targeted to schools and students with the greatest need.
  • LEAs must indicate data used to determine greatest need.
greatest need requirement reminder
Greatest Need Requirement Reminder!
  • LEA must provide a comprehensive drug and violence prevention program;
  • LEA does not need to allocate more or all of the SDFSC funds to campuses that are determined to be in greatest need of prevention services;
  • LEA must document that they have determined which campuses have the greatest need of prevention services (through a needs assessment), and that those needs are being addressed.
requirements in sas71
Requirements InSAS
  • LEAs must indicate the percentage of administrative costs budgeted for Title IV, SDFSC.
requirements in sas72
Requirements InSAS
  • LEAs must indicate the percentage of security costs budgeted for hiring and training security personnel;
  • LEAs will continue to indicate the percentage of security costs budgeted for security equipment/hardware, reporting criminal offenses, developing security plans, and supporting safe zones of passage.
safe and drug free schools and communities73
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2000-01 SDFSC Annual Evaluation
  • NCLB Updates
  • Private Schools
private school participation
Private School Participation
  • LEAs shall consult with private school officials during the design and development of their SDFSC programs on issues such as:
private school participation75
Private School Participation
  • How the students needs will be identified;
  • What services will be offered;
  • How, where, and by whom the services will be provided;
  • How the services will be assessed and how the results of the assessment will be used to improve those services;
private school participation76
Private School Participation
  • The size and scope of the equitable services to be provided to the eligible private school children, teachers, and other educational personnel and the amount of funds available for those services; and
private school participation77
Private School Participation
  • How and when the LEA or SSA will make decisions about the delivery of services, including a thorough consideration and analysis of the views of the private school officials on the provision of contract services through potential third-party providers.
facilities for the neglected and delinquent
Facilities for the Neglected and Delinquent
  • LEAs may provide Title IV, SDFSC services toneglected and delinquent facilities for those students attending the LEA;
  • If those students are included in the comprehensive needs assessment of the district.
safe and drug free schools and communities79
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2000-01 SDFSC Annual Evaluation
  • NCLB Updates
  • Private Schools
  • Some Things Never Change
some things never change
Some Things Never Change
  • Intent and purpose of Title IV SDFSC;
  • Comprehensive program;
  • Consultation with required stakeholders;
  • Cannot roll forward more than 25% of current year entitlement;
safe and drug free schools and communities81
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2000-01 SDFSC Annual Evaluation
  • NCLB Updates
  • Private Schools
  • Some Things Never Change
  • New Data Collection Requirements
evaluated periodically
Evaluated Periodically
  • Evaluated periodically against locally selected performance measures and modified over time (based on the evaluation) to refine, improve, and strengthen the program;
  • Shall be made available to the pubic upon request.
prevalence of risk factors protective factors buffers assets or other variables83
Prevalence of “Risk Factors, Protective Factors, Buffers, Assets, or Other Variables”
  • Analysis of the prevalence of “risk factors, protective factors, buffers, assets, or other variables”, identified through scientifically based research, that exist in the schools and communities in the State;
new requirement for annual sdfsc evaluation 2002 0384
New Requirement ForAnnual SDFSC Evaluation2002-03
  • Includes a description of how parents were informed of, and participated in, violence and drug prevention efforts.
new evaluation requirements at the state level umirs
New Evaluation Requirements at the State Level-UMIRS
  • Truancy Rates—To be collected in PEIMS 425 Report beginning in SY2003-2004;
  • Types of curricula, programs and services provided by the Governor’s Office, TEA, ESCs and LEAs; and
  • Age of onset, perception of health risk and social disapproval of drug use and violence by youth in schools and communities.
safe and drug free schools and communities86
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
  • Results of 2000-01 SDFSC Annual Evaluation
  • NCLB Updates
  • Private Schools
  • Some Things Never Change
  • New Data Collection Requirements
  • Resources and Grant Winners
publications
Publications
  • “What You Need To Know About Drug Testing In Schools” (ONDCP) at www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/pdf/drug_testing.pdf
  • “Threat Assessment in Schools: A Guide to Managing Threatening Situations and to Creating Safe School Climates” at www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/SDFS/threatassessmentguide.pdf
publications88
Publications
  • “Wide Scope, Questionable Quality: Three Reports From The Study On School Violence & Prevention” www.ed.gov/offices/OSDFS/publications.html
  • “Indicators Of School Crime And Safety” www.ed.gov/offices/OSDFS/publications.html
  • NCLB Desktop Reference www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/reference.pdf
  • NCLB Policy Guidance (p. 244) www.tea.state.tx.us/nclb Click on Policy Guidance Documents
informational websites
Informational Websites
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) www.samhsa.gov
  • Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) www.samhsa.gov/centers/csap/csap.html
  • United States Department of Education www.ed.gov/offices/OSDFS/index.html
texas grant award recipients carol m white physical education
Texas Grant Award Recipients Carol M. White Physical Education
  • Round Rock ISD
  • Mesquite ISD
  • Goodrich ISD
  • Katy ISD
  • Houston ISD
  • Fort Worth ISD
texas grant award recipients sdfs mentoring program
Texas Grant Award Recipients SDFS Mentoring Program
  • Big Brother/Big Sisters Arlington
  • Communities In Schools Dallas
  • Fort Worth ISD
  • Families Under Urban and Social Attack Houston
  • I Have a Dream-Houston
texas grant award recipients grants to reduce alcohol abuse
Texas Grant Award Recipients Grants to Reduce Alcohol Abuse
  • Karnes City ISD
  • Fort Bend ISD
  • New Braunfels ISD