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SafeStart & SafeTrack Division. Breaking the Cycle of Risky Behavior. Larry Wilson SafeStart SafeTrack A division of Electrolab Office: 1-800-792-6933 ext 324 Cell: (604)902-1050 Larry@electrolab.ca Larry@electrolab.ca. Gary A. Higbee EMBA CSP Electrolab training Systems &

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SafeStart & SafeTrack Division


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    1. SafeStart & SafeTrack Division

    2. Breaking the Cycle of Risky Behavior Larry Wilson SafeStart SafeTrack A division of Electrolab Office: 1-800-792-6933 ext 324 Cell: (604)902-1050 Larry@electrolab.ca Larry@electrolab.ca Gary A. Higbee EMBA CSP Electrolab training Systems & Higbee & Associates, Inc. Office 515-270-6623 Cell 586-604-3765 g.higbee@mchsi.com

    3. Filling Your Personal Safety Tool Box • Topics • Introduction to Safety Awareness issues • “Why People do What They do” • Four States & Four Critical Errors That Cause “All” Accidents

    4. Unsafe Conditions • Unknown • Failed to correct

    5. Unsafe Acts • Unknown • Unable • Positive reinforcement of negative acts • Unmotivated

    6. Combine Two Basic Approaches: • Compliance • OSHA – MSHA – NFPA - Laws • Rules - Procedures - PPE - etc. • Voluntary Standards - AISC • Behavior Modification (US Culture) • External • Culture • Habit • Observation • Internal • Attitude • Habit Significant Resistance

    7. Relationship: Hazard, Behavior and Risk • Concept - Hazards seldom change but the way we interface with the hazard (our behavior) varies and our risk of injury increases or decreases depending on the behavior we exhibit. • To a great degree we control our own “Risk Triangle”

    8. 3,000 NEAR MISSES OR FIRST AID 1 FATAL 30 MAJORS (Disabling Accidents) 300 RECORDABLE ACCIDENTS (Off Work, limited work and no lost time) 30,000 HAZARDS Unsafe acts-Unsafe conditions

    9. Standard RiskPyramid Fatal Major Injuries Minor Injuries Cuts, Bruises and Scrapes Close Calls & Near Misses

    10. Standard RiskPyramid Walking on Bike Path

    11. Standard RiskPyramid Running on Bike Path

    12. Standard RiskPyramid Walking Blindfolded on Bike Path

    13. Safety Skill Development I’m Safe Enough I’m Not Safe Enough Time in Years

    14. Injury Decline I’m Not Safe Enough I’m Safe Enough Time in Years

    15. Natural Decline in Injuries I’m Not Safe Enough Injuries I’m Safe Enough 0 10 20 30 Age in Years

    16. Natural Increase in Safety Skills I’m Safe Enough I’m Not Safe Enough Safety Skills 0 10 20 30 Age in Years

    17. Hazardous Energy Step Changes Safety Skill Gaps Cars, Motorcycles, Snowmobiles, Power Boats, Automated Equipment, etc Hazardous Energy Safety Skills Skateboards, Bikes, Climbing Trees, Sports Crawling, Walking, Running 0 10 20 30 40 Age in Years

    18. Hazardous Energy and Injuries Injuries Hazardous Energy 1 10 20 30 Age in Years

    19. Hazardous Energy Person Unexpected

    20. Sources of Unexpected…… Events - something unexpected happens without you or someone else involved (e.g. wire rope breaks; traffic lights start working incorrectly; coupling fails; hose bursts; etc.)

    21. Other People - someone else's behaviour causes or contributes to incident/injury. Sources of Unexpected……

    22. Sources of Unexpected…… Self - Own actions cause or contribute to incident/injury.

    23. Self - Own actions cause or contribute to incident/injury. Other People - someone else's behaviour causes or contributes to incident/injury. Events - something unexpected happens without you or someone else involved (e.g. wire rope breaks; traffic lights start working incorrectly; coupling fails; hose bursts; etc.) Sources of Unexpected……

    24. There Are 3 Types of At-risk Behavior • Conscious or intentional behavior • Habitual behavior • Unintentional behavior Even if people are deliberately willing to increase the risk of a situation, hardly any of them are deliberately trying to get hurt. Something unexpected or unplanned always has to enter the equation.

    25. Conscious - Intentional

    26. Unintentional

    27. Habit

    28. The Four Critical Errors • Eyes Not on Task(s) • Mind Not on Task(s) • Being in The Line-of-fire • Poor Balance/Traction/Grip © CERT Nail – Exit – Car Door - Ice

    29. The Four States • Rushing • Frustration • Fatigue • Complacency • Cause or Contribute to the Four Critical Errors That Cause “All” Accidents © CERT

    30. States (Cause) Errors More risk Less risk (To become) (Which cause) • Rushing • Frustration • Fatigue • Complacency Major Major • Eyes Not on Task • Mind not on task • Line of fire • Balance, Traction, Grip Minor Minor Close Calls Close Calls Hazards with a critical error Hazards Risk Patterns To Become

    31. Critical Error Reduction Techniques © CERT • Self Trigger on the State • to prevent or avoid making the error • Analyze Close Calls and small injuries • to prevent big ones – Learn from our OOPS! • Observers Others for the State to Error Patterns • To avoid the risk • To prevent complacency • To recognize and intervene with co-workers • Work on our Habits • Personal safety skills Basic Safety Skills Are Learnable & Transferable