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u/s 15900

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  1. u/s 15900 Prepare and Present Meat in the hospitality industry. Level 1 Credit 4 us 15900 - Meat

  2. There are four basic meat types we are going to look at: • beef • lamb • pork • chicken us 15900 - Meat

  3. Quality Points • A good quality dish needs quality ingredients. So what should you be looking for to make sure meat is fresh and of a high quality. us 15900 - Meat

  4. Knowing what you are looking for requires using your senses: • Eyes • what does good quality meat look like? • Nose • what should good quality meat smell like? • Hands • what does it feel like? us 15900 - Meat

  5. ALL meat should have a pleasant smell. They won’t smell the same e.g. Chicken will smell different from beef – but the smell should be agreeable and appropriate for the type of meat. us 15900 - Meat

  6. Quality Purchasing Points of Beef The lean meat should be bright red, not dull. The meat should have small flecks of white fat, known as marbling. The fat should be firm, brittle in texture, creamy white and odourless. us 15900 - Meat

  7. The lean meat should be bright red, not dull. • Bright red meat means the blood is still within the tissue (muscle) and has not decomposed. • Dull meat indicates the blood has drawn (drained) out of the flesh and is getting older. us 15900 - Meat

  8. The meat should have small flecks of white fat (marbling). • Meat that is well marbled will have small pockets of fat throughout the tissue and will cook quickly and taste tender. • Meat with a few large pockets of fat will only be tender around the fat area as the fat in the marbled pocket breaks down, loosening the tissue around it. us 15900 - Meat

  9. Marbled Beef • The much-sought-after Kobe beef has a unique history originating in Japan during the 2nd century. • This distinctly marbled meat is so tender you can cut it with a butter knife. To experience this beef is like gracing your palette with a fine wine–full of complex flavours, subtle sweetness and a lingering finish. us 15900 - Meat

  10. The fat should be firm, brittle in texture, creamy white & odourless • Fat in fresh meat that has been recently slaughtered (killed) will be firm and brittle and creamy white and have no odour (smell). • As the meat ages the fat changes texture and becomes more pliable and acquires a distinctive odour and becomes a creamy yellow colour. us 15900 - Meat

  11. Quality Purchasing Points of Lamb and Mutton Carcass – compact body, even layer of flesh, pleasant smell. Flesh – dull red colour, fine texture & fine grain. Fat – evenly distributed, hard, white and flaky, not sticky. Bones – pink and porous in young animals, white & brittle in older animals. us 15900 - Meat

  12. Good quality lamb or mutton should be compact and evenly fleshed. • The meat should be tightly structured and even throughout the carcass. • Large pockets of fat or loose flesh indicate an old carcass and poor feeding. us 15900 - Meat

  13. The lean flesh should be a dull red colour. • Lamb / mutton does not contain as much iron-rich blood as beef so it is a dull red colour. • If the flesh is a red-grey colour or dull grey colour this indicates that it has lost blood and is getting older. us 15900 - Meat

  14. The lean flesh should have a fine texture or grain • Even, finely grained flesh indicates the carcass is of top quality & has been fed on prime fed. • Poorly conditioned lamb / mutton often has a coarse texture & uneven grain. us 15900 - Meat

  15. The fat should be evenly distributed(across the carcass & not pocketed in small areas.) • Good quality lamb / mutton should contain some fat as this adds flavour & aids in the cooking process. us 15900 - Meat

  16. The fat should be hard & brittle, flaky in structure & clear white in colour • Hard / brittle fat indicates the carcass has been recently slaughtered. As the meat ages the fat decomposes & becomes more pliable & it changes structure from flaky slithers to a congealed gel. • Young meat has fat which is clear white in colour & as it ages the fat becomes opaque & creamy white. us 15900 - Meat

  17. Young animals should have bones that are pink and porous • Good quality lamb carcasses will have bones that are pink & porous as the calcium structure has not yet solidified & become dense. us 15900 - Meat

  18. Mutton should have bones that are hard, dense, white and inclined to splinter • Good quality mutton bones should be hard & dense. The bones should be white & inclined to splinter when chopped. • When bones on mutton carcasses are not so dense/hard, or they do not splinter, this indicates poor nutrition of the animal & a carcass that is of poor quality. us 15900 - Meat

  19. Quality Purchasing Points of Pork Flesh – should be pale pink and fine in texture. Fat – should be white, firm and smooth. It should not be excessive. Bones – should be small, fine and pinkish in colour. Skin should be smooth. us 15900 - Meat

  20. The flesh should be pale pink and firm • Pork meat is pale pink in colour & becomes off-white as it ages. • It should be firm & not hold a dent when pressed. us 15900 - Meat

  21. The flesh should be a fine texture • Fine textured, firm flesh indicates the meat is lean & the pig has been well fed. • Poorly fed animals will have flesh that is rich in fat & loose in texture. us 15900 - Meat

  22. The fat should be white, firm and smooth • Good quality pork fat is white in colour & firm & smooth in texture. • As it ages it goes creamy yellow & loses it firmness. us 15900 - Meat

  23. The fat should not be excessive • With the trend for pork to be lean & trim, pork meat should possess only a small amount of fat. • Pockets of excessive fat indicate a poor quality animal & they should be removed. us 15900 - Meat

  24. Pork bones should be small, fine and pinkish • The major part of the carcass should be flesh & therefore the bones should small & fine. • They (the bones) are rich in nutrients & have a pinkish tinge to them. • Bones that are off-white or grey indicate the carcass has aged & lost many of the nutrients. us 15900 - Meat

  25. The skin (rind) should be smooth • Many pork recipes or pork cuts include the skin, called the rind & should be smooth & firm. • Skin that is ribbed or peeling indicates that the meat is old. us 15900 - Meat

  26. Quality Purchasing Points of Chicken Breast meat should be plump. Flesh should be firm and bounce back when pressed. The tip of the breastbone should be pliable in young birds. Skin should be intact and cover whole bird. us 15900 - Meat

  27. Quality chicken should have a white skin with a faint bluish tint • The flesh will be a pink colour on the breast & thigh areas & a darker red around the neck, wing & legs. • Chicken that is fed on corn or steroids may have flesh with a yellowy hue. • Skin that is yellow & flesh that is grey indicates the bird is old or of poor quality. Poultry in this condition is very vulnerable to micro-organisms that can cause food poisoning. us 15900 - Meat

  28. Poultry should be plucked and presented with the head, neck and feet removed. Giblets and innards should be removed. • Birds that are cooked with feathers, feet, necks or giblets attached should not be used in the hospitality industry as they impart a distinctive flavour into the chicken dish & will detract from the presentation. us 15900 - Meat

  29. The skin should be intact and cover the bird • The layer of fat just below the skin is important for adding flavour & keeping the bird moist during cooking, most establishments will only remove the skin when presenting health conscious meals/dishes involving breast meat only. • All birds should have a small pocket of fat around the tail. Birds with large pockets of fat are often old or in poor condition. us 15900 - Meat

  30. Quality poultry should smell fresh and not have an offensive odour • Aged or poorly stored birds will have a pungent odour because as the tissue in the meat decomposes the bacterium create a by-product which produces this smell. us 15900 - Meat

  31. Flesh on quality birds should be plump, especially around the breast. The flesh should be firm and bounce back when pressed. • Flesh that has lost its plumpness indicates the tissues inside are starting to decompose. • As the tissue breaks down the cell liquids come out & the water content of the meat deteriorates. us 15900 - Meat

  32. Quality birds will have a pliable breast bone. • With age, this bone can become brittle & more likely to break. us 15900 - Meat

  33. Quality Points for Meat • List two quality purchasing points for beef. • List two quality purchasing points for lamb and mutton. • List two quality purchasing points for pork. • List two quality purchasing points for chicken. us 15900 - Meat

  34. Quality Points for Meat • List two quality purchasing points for beef. • lean meat should be bright red, not dull • the meat should have small flecks of white fat; marbling • the fat should be firm, brittle in texture, creamy white & odourless • List two quality purchasing points for lamb and mutton. • good quality lamb & mutton should be compact & evenly fleshed • the lean meat should be a dull red colour • the lean flesh should have a fine texture or grain • the fat should be evenly distributed • the fat should be hard & brittle in texture, flaky in structure & clear white in colour • young animals should have bones that are pink & porous • mutton should have bones that are hard, dense, white & inclined to splinter us 15900 - Meat

  35. Quality Points for Meat • List two quality purchasing points for pork. • the flesh should be pale pink & firm • the flesh should be a fine texture • the fat should be white, firm & smooth • the fat should not be excessive • pork bones should be small, fine & pinkish • the skin should be smooth • List two quality purchasing points for chicken. • quality chicken should have a white skin with a faint bluish tint • poultry should be plucked & presented with the head, neck & feet removed • giblets & innards should be removed • the skin should be intact & cover the whole bird • quality poultry should smell fresh & not have an offensive odour • flesh on quality birds should be plump, especially around the breast; the flesh should be firm & bounce back when pressed • quality birds will have a pliable breast bone us 15900 - Meat

  36. CUTS OF MEAT • It is important to identify the different cuts according to their position on the carcass, as this determines the end use for eating. • Understanding meat structure helps the cook to choose the method of cookery best suited to the cut. • Those muscle groups that do more work tend to be tougher than those that do little work. The muscles that are not used for vigorous exercise are finer grained & more tender us 15900 - Meat

  37. CUTS OF MEAT • We are going to look at some of the cuts for meat of the meat types: • beef – the meat from farmed cattle • lamb – the meat from a young sheep under one year • pork – the meat from a pig • chicken – the meat from farm bred chickens • We will identify where it comes from on the carcass, look at the meat structure, the smaller cuts it can be broken down into & suitable methods of cookery for each. us 15900 - Meat

  38. BEEF • The cuts we will look at are: • topside • silverside • rump • sirloin (striploin) • fillet us 15900 - Meat

  39. Beef Cuts and Tenderness us 15900 - Meat

  40. TOPSIDE • Comes from the hindquarter of the carcass. It is a dry muscle that contains very little internal fat. us 15900 - Meat

  41. Topside • Preparation techniques • Topside can be cut into: • topside steaks • topside schnitzel • strips for stir fry • makes ideal lean mince • Cookery methods • This (medium tender) cut is not suited to roasting or grilling as it has very little internal fat & it cooked by these methods it would be very dry. • It is best suited for stewing but can be used as a second-class roast. us 15900 - Meat

  42. SILVERSIDE • Comes from the hindquarter. • Is a medium tender, boneless, lean meat. us 15900 - Meat

  43. Silverside • Preparation techniques • Silverside can be cut into: • silverside steaks • diced for stewing • left whole pickled or corned • Cookery methods • Is best suited to stewing, braising or boiling us 15900 - Meat

  44. Making Corn Beef • Kiwi Kitchen • episode 8, 1 Mar 2008 • chapter 2 • Ryan – ex SBHS www.tvnxondemand.co.nz us 15900 - Meat

  45. RUMP • Comes from the hindquarter. • It is a medium tender, boneless, lean cut with exterior fat cover on one side. us 15900 - Meat

  46. Rump • Preparation techniques • Rump can be cut into: • rump steaks • Cookery methods • Whole rump is suitable for roasting. • Rump steaks are best suited to grilling or pan frying. us 15900 - Meat

  47. SIRLOIN • Comes from the hindquarter. • It is a tender cut & the lean meat may have some marbling. us 15900 - Meat

  48. Sirloin • Preparation techniques • Rump can be cut into: • sirloin/porterhouse steaks • minute steaks • strips for stir frying • Cookery methods • Whole sirloin is suitable for roasting. • Steaks are best suited to grilling. • Strips are best suited for shallow frying. us 15900 - Meat

  49. FILLET • Comes from the hindquarter. • It is the most tender, juicy (contains marbling) cut of beef. • The whole fillet tapers from thick butt end to thin tail end. us 15900 - Meat

  50. Fillet • Preparation techniques • Fillet can be cut into: • chateaubriand • tournedos • mignon • fillet steaks • strips for shallow frying • Cookery methods • Whole fillet is suitable for roasting. • Steaks are best suited to grilling. • Strips are best suited for shallow frying. us 15900 - Meat