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Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Module #2: Writing SLOs. Office of Academic Planning & Accountability Institutional Effectiveness Moderator: Dr. Cathy Bays. Objectives. Upon completion of the module #2, participants will be able to write SLOs that: use action verbs

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Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Module #2: Writing SLOs


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student learning outcomes slos module 2 writing slos

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)Module #2: Writing SLOs

Office of Academic Planning & Accountability

Institutional Effectiveness

Moderator: Dr. Cathy Bays

objectives
Objectives

Upon completion of the module #2, participants will be able to write SLOs that:

  • use action verbs
  • are measurable (direct, indirect, benchmarking)
  • include targets
what are slos
What are ‘SLOs’?

Student learning outcomes (SLOs) are statements that specify the knowledge (cognitive), skills (psychomotor), and perceptions (affective) students will be able to demonstrate when they have completed their academic program or course.

measuring slos direct
Measuring ‘SLOs’ - Direct

Direct measures of ‘SLOs’

  • Students show us (provide evidence) what they learned
  • Faculty identify and measure observable behaviors or actions by the learner

Examples of direct measures for ‘SLOs’: objective tests, essays, presentations, lab experiments, artistic performance, special projects, classroom assignments, portfolios

measuring slos indirect
Measuring ‘SLOs’ - Indirect

Indirect measures of ‘SLOs’

Students tell us what they learned usually in one of two ways:

  • What students believe they have learned—self-reported
  • How satisfied they are with their experience – self reported

Examples: exit surveys, student interviews, and course evaluations

There are additional institutional metrics and assessments to indirectly measure ‘SLOs’.

Examples: graduation rates, GPA, job placement, continuing education placement, alumni surveys, quality measurement system surveys {QMS}, faculty questionnaire, and employer satisfaction surveys

measuring slos benchmarks
Measuring ‘SLOs’- Benchmarks

Include standards or benchmarks where applicable

  • Internal standards

Are students meeting identified program/unit standards?

  • External standards

Are students meeting standards set by an entity outside of the university?

  • Internal peer benchmarks

How do students compare to peers within the program/unit?

  • External peer benchmarks

How do students compare to peers at other institutions?

setting targets
Setting Targets

Targets are specific, quantifiable behavioral expectations of students’ collective performance related to each measure of student learning outcome.

setting targets1
Setting Targets

Express targets as percentages rather than averages.

  • If you use a 4-point rubric, a target that 90% of the students will earn at least a 3 out of 4 is clear and precise when compared to a target that states students will earn an average of 3.1 on a 4-point rubric scale.
  • If you use a 100-point numeric score, a target that 95% of the students will earn at least a 75 is clear and precise when compared to a target that states students will earn an average of 75.
setting targets2
Setting Targets

Use of multiple performance targets for several performance levels may be indicated. For example:

  • If you use a 4-point rubric, a target that 80% of the students will earn at least a 3 out of 4 and another 10% of the students will earn a 4 out of 4.
  • If you use a 100-point numeric score, a target that 80% of the students will earn at least a 75 and another 10% of the students will earn at least a 92.
references resources
References & Resources

Maki, P.L. (2004). Assessing for learning: Building a sustainable commitment across the institution. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Suskie, L. (2009). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. 2nd ed. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

contact information
Contact Information

Bob Goldstein

Associate University Provost

rsgold03@louisville.edu

Connie Shumake

Assistant University Provost

ccshum01@louisville.edu

Cheryl Gilchrist

Director of Institutional Effectiveness

cbgilc01@louisville.edu

Cathy Bays

i2a Specialist for Assessment

clbays01@louisville.edu