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Designing Your Own Course - Assessments. Monica A. Devanas, Ph.D. Director, Faculty Development and Assessment Programs Center for Teaching Advancement and Assessment Research. Assessment. Three essential questions 1 ) What do we want our students to learn?

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designing your own course assessments

Designing Your Own Course - Assessments

Monica A. Devanas, Ph.D.

Director, Faculty Development and Assessment Programs

Center for Teaching Advancement and Assessment Research

assessment
Assessment

Three essential questions

1) What do we want our students to learn?

2) Are students learning what we want them to learn?

3) How can we modify our class so more students as possible are successful?

assessment1
Assessment

Three essential questions

1) What do we want our students to learn?

2) Are students learning what we want them to learn?

3) How can we modify our class so more students as possible are successful?

what do we want our students to learn
What do we want our students to learn?

Learning Goals

University-wide

School-wide

Department mission and goals

Overarching goals – two or three

BIG ideas

Specific course goals

what are the practices in your department
What are the practices in your department?
  • What are your Department’s learning goals?
  • Are you teaching now?
  • What are your course goals?
what do we want our students to learn1
What do we want our students to learn?

Course Goals – Three Domains for Learning

  • Cognitive: What does the student know?
  • Performance/Skill: What can the student do?
  • Affective: What does the student care about?
slide7
Rutgers University

Mission

Goals

School of Arts and Science

Goals

Core Curriculum

Department

Goals

Course

Goals

learning goals need to be specific
Learning Goals Need to be Specific

Goal: Students will “understand economics”

learning goals need to be specific1
Learning Goals Need to be Specific

Goal: Students will “understand economics”

NOT “understand”

BUT: Define terms. Describe in context of discipline.

Test theoretical concepts with empirically.

Clearly identify a research problem.

Evaluate a particular circumstance or scenario.

Make falsifiable predictions based on evidence.

Summarize research findings into coherent.

Select tools for empirical use.

Model abstractly in a meaningful way.

Need to be “specific actions”

slide10
Bloom’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain

=> Design

=> Recommend

=> Compare

=> Demonstrate

=> Interpret

=> Define

http://ww2.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.htm

are students learning what we want them to learn
Are students learning what we want them to learn?

Measureable Learning Goals

Determine - Knowledge, Skills, and/or Values

Decide – Through what activities will students “practice” and “learn”? i.e. Assignments

Assess = Measure = Collect Feedback

assess measure collect feedback
Assess = Measure = Collect Feedback

Kinds of Assessment

Formative = Assessment for improvement

Summative = Assessment for grading (final)

Quantitative = methods using numbers, statistical analysis (surveys, tests, i.e. T/F, multiple choice)(What)

Qualitative = interpretive, not easily converted to numbers (essays, open-ended questions, observations)(Why)

formative assessments
Formative Assessments

Classroom Assessment Techniques –

  • Angelo, Thomas A. and Cross, K. Patricia (1993). Classroom Assessment Techniques. Jossey- Bass.

questioning, observation, discussion, concept test, concept map, self-assessments, practice, one-minute paper, summary, paraphrase, interviews, performance assessment

scoring rubrics
Scoring Rubrics

Expectations for completeness and quality in assignments

  • Define criteria for task
    • Clarify with definition or example
  • Define rating scale for quality
    • Add descriptions of expectations for quality in each criterion
summative assessment
Summative Assessment
  • Evaluate student learning at end of unit
  • Use standards or benchmarks for expectations
    • Tests
    • Projects
    • Major research paper
    • Senior project
    • Presentation
    • Performance
multiple choice questions
Multiple Choice Questions
  • Stem – state problem
  • Alternatives – suggested solutions
    • Answer – correct solution
    • Distractor – incorrect solution
  • Analysis of Multiple Choice Questions
multiple choice questions1
Multiple Choice Questions

Analysis of Multiple Choice Questions

  • Test Item Analysis
    • Difficulty - % students choosing correct answer
      • 90% = easy 40% = hard
    • Discrimination = effectiveness
      • student’s score on one question compared to total score
      • Range between -1.0 and +1.0

Target = moderate difficulty, high discrimination

what are your proposed assessments
What are your proposed assessments?
  • Student Learning Goal or Objective
  • Knowledge, Skills, Values
  • Formative vs. Summative
  • Qualitative vs. Quantitative
  • Scoring Rubric
student assessment of learning goals
Student Assessment of Learning Goals
  • “SALG”
  • Student self-assessment
  • Pre-course baseline, post-course assessment
  • Statistical analysis of class responses
  • Free, online, supported by National Science Foundation
  • http://salgsite.org
  • Elaine Seymore, Stephen Carroll
assessment2
Assessment

Three essential questions

1) What do we want our students to learn?

2) Are students learning what we want them to learn?

3) How can we modify our class so more students as possible are successful?

Examine feedback from students, design changes for specific improvement, collect feedback, incorporate changes = SOTL =

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

http://sotl.illinoisstate.edu

http://www.issotl.org/SOTL.html

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