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Measuring Community Change. Mary Emery: SDSU Milan Wall: Heartland Center for Leadership Development Liz Weaver: Tamarack Tom Kelly: Anne E. Casey Foundation. Purpose. Several year effort with multiple stakeholders looking at what we can learn about successful community change

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measuring community change

Measuring Community Change

Mary Emery: SDSU

Milan Wall: Heartland Center for Leadership Development

Liz Weaver: Tamarack

Tom Kelly: Anne E. Casey Foundation

purpose
Purpose
  • Several year effort with multiple stakeholders looking at what we can learn about successful community change
  • Many community change initiatives
  • Lots of investment in community change
  • Do these initiatives make a difference?
    • How do we know?
    • Measuring change is difficult
hierarchy of community impacts

Hierarchy of Community Impacts

Prepared by

Milan Wall, Co-Director

Heartland Center for Leadership Development

why another evaluation model
Why Another Evaluation Model?
  • Designed for the community leader
  • Scientific jargon is minimized
  • Is easy to utilize
  • Is not time-consuming
  • Allows for the assessment of impacts from the start of implementation
hierarchy of community impacts a leadership development program example
Hierarchy of Community ImpactsA Leadership Development Program Example
  • Activities
    • Has a program been created?
    • How many people are engaged?
  • Outputs
    • What is the program producing?
    • Are participants attending?
hierarchy of community impacts a leadership development program example1
Hierarchy of Community ImpactsA Leadership Development Program Example
  • Commitments
    • What are the graduates saying and what are they doing?
      • Expressed Commitments
      • Acted Upon Commitments
  • Outcomes
    • What community betterment has resulted from the graduates’ actions?
hierarchy of community impacts a leadership development program example2
Hierarchy of Community ImpactsA Leadership Development Program Example
  • Indicators of Systemic Change
    • What long-term changes have been affected?
      • has the pool of people engaged in community leadership roles become more diversified?
      • Are there more young people or people of color, or at least new faces among emerging and engaged leaders?
the complex nature of poverty
The Complex Nature of Poverty

“Poverty is a complex issue. There is no single cause and no one solution. Its successful reduction, and ideally its eradication, require a set of linked interventions undertaken by all orders of government working in collaboration with communities.”

Poverty Policy

Sherri Torjman,

Caledon Institute of Social Policy

October 2008

vibrant communities
Vibrant Communities

An experiment designed to test a specific way to address the complex realities of poverty through local level action.

Theory of Change:

Guided by 5 principles & assisted by extra supports provided by national sponsors –

local organizations and leaders could revitalize poverty reduction efforts in their communities and generate significantly improved outcomes.

slide14

Sustainable

Livelihoods

Approach –

Assets Pentagon

  • Inner resources
  • Self-awareness
  • Self-esteem and self-confidence
  • Hope and motivation
  • Basic material goods and services
  • Emergency supports
  • Food
  • Housing
  • Transportation
  • Dependent care

Personal Assets

Physical

Assets

  • Income, Savings and Sources of Financial Security
  • Employment income
  • Non-employment income
  • Savings and financial assets
  • Reduced debt/costs
  • Relationships
  • and Networks
  • Civic participation
  • Support networks

Financial Assets

Social Assets

Human

Assets

  • Skills, knowledge, education & health
  • Health
  • Life skills
  • Financial literacy
  • Education
  • Employment Skills
four levels of community outcomes
Four Levels of Community Outcomes
  • Policy and Systems Change
  • Increased Community Capacity
  • Increased Community Engagement
  • Decreased Poverty
slide17

Working Collaboratively, Communities can …

Raise the profile of poverty.

Build a constituency for change.

Encourage collaborative ways of working.

Begin to shift systems underlying poverty.

Contribute to the asset-building efforts for a large number of people.

vc success factors
VC Success Factors
  • Influential and credible convener(s)
  • Cross-sector, connected leadership table
  • Challenging community aspiration
  • Clearly articulated purpose and approach
  • High degree of resident mobilization
  • Research which informs the work
slide20
Tom Kelly

Annie E. Casey Foundation

tkelly@aecf.org

September 20, 2011

Measuring Community Change

slide21

10

Implementation sites

2000 to 2010

White Center

Hartford

Providence

Milwaukee

Oakland

Des Moines

Indianapolis

Denver

Louisville

San Antonio

critical success questions
Critical Success Questions
  • Can positive outcomes be achieved for large numbers of children and families in a neighborhood of concentrated poverty?
  • Can impactat the neighborhood level influence local leaders, organizations, systems, and funding?
  • Can this work be sustained?
  • Can this work be scaled?
achieving dual generation results
Achieving Dual-Generation Results

Economic Opportunities

Families have increased earnings and income

Site Strategies

Programs and Initiatives

Technical Assistance

Co-investments

Families have increased assets

Social Networks

Children are healthy and prepared to succeed in school

Effective Services & Supports

  • WHAT IT TAKES TO ACHIEVE RESULTS
  • Broad agreement on results
  • Data, performance measurement, and managing to results
  • Partnerships among residents and institutions
  • Effective services & programs, linked to policy
  • Leveraging the resources of other funders and systems
  • Resident leadership
the stages of systemic change beverly parsons insites
The Stages of Systemic ChangeBeverly ParsonsInSites

Transition

Awareness

Exploration

New

Structures

Pre-

dominance

Maintenance of Old Systems

Key Elements of ChangeVision

Public & Political Support

Networking

Teaching & Learning

Roles & Responsibilities

Policy Alignment

process of core capacity measurement
Process of Core Capacity Measurement
  • Common cross-site understanding of stages, key elements (capacities), and definitions
  • Individualized indicators based on local context for each capacity and stage
  • Participatory reflection and self-assessment of key stakeholders/actors (facilitated by evaluators)
  • Change measured against local baseline