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ERA 1: Beginnings to 1660. Three Worlds Meet. HISTORICAL TIMELINE: . Nomadic Paleo-Indians occupied Tennessee 12,000-15,000 years ago during the Paleo-Indian Period . They left behind arrowheads and spear points.

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era 1 beginnings to 1660

ERA 1: Beginnings to 1660

Three Worlds Meet

slide2

HISTORICAL TIMELINE:

Nomadic Paleo-Indians occupied Tennessee 12,000-15,000 years ago during the Paleo-Indian Period. They left behind arrowheads and spear points.

During the Archaic Period, Indians hunted and gathered, and eventually started cultivating plants– the beginnings of agriculture.

The Woodland Period, which lasted 2,000 years, saw the introduction of pottery and the beginnings of settled farming communities. Burial mounds were constructed.

The Mississippian Period (900-1600 AD) saw the erection of ceremonial temples and public structures. The society became increasingly complex, and new strains of corn and beans were cultivated. The population grew rapidly.

a dominican monk bartolom de las casas decries spanish cruelty in the new world
A Dominican monk, Bartolomé de Las Casas, decries Spanish cruelty in the New World
  • “The natives of the province of Santa Marta (located in modern-day Columbia) had a great deal of gold…the people who lived there (had) the will and the know-how to extract it. And this is the reason why, from 1498 right down to today, in 1542, this region has attracted an uninterrupted series of Spanish plunderers who have done nothing but sail there, attack, murder, and rob the people, steal their gold and sail back again.”
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The Spanish, led by Pizarro, attack the Incas: “They killed the Indians like ants….So many Indians were killed it was impracticable to count them. As for the Spaniards, only five of them lost their lives…”

ruins of a spanish mission church san jos de los jemez new mexico
Ruins of a Spanish mission church, San José de los Jemez (New Mexico)

A contemporary Franciscan from Jemez stated, “We cannot preach the Gospel now, for it is despised by these people on account of our great offenses and the harm we have done them.”

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A large head sculpted by the Olmec, an ancient Pre-Columbian people from Mexico and Central America

what bones can tell us about native americans
What bones can tell us about Native Americans

Note the arrowhead lodged in the skull pictured above

spanish explorer hernando de soto reaches tennessee in the early 16 th century
Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto reaches Tennessee in the early 16th century

De Soto battles Native Americans