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Simple Short Reports #1 Sharon, Tracey, & Sandra A short report using pre-existing data Prof. Craig Jackson Prof of PowerPoint Presentation
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Simple Short Reports #1 Sharon, Tracey, & Sandra A short report using pre-existing data Prof. Craig Jackson Prof of Occupational Health Psychology Head of Psychology BCU. craig.jackson@bcu.ac.uk. Are there excessive numbers of Sharons in G.U.M clinics

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slide1

Simple Short Reports #1

Sharon, Tracey, & Sandra

A short report using pre-existing data

Prof. Craig Jackson

Prof of Occupational Health Psychology

Head of Psychology

BCU

craig.jackson@bcu.ac.uk

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Are there excessive numbers of Sharons in G.U.M clinics

Can age and social class be determined by patient names?

Pediatricians seldom report Hildas or Ethels in the 1990’s

Geriatricians have not yet met Kylies or Bradleys or Robbies

Is Camilla more likely to have private medical insurance than Paula?

Do Tracey, Sandra and Sharon visit GUM clinics more than Jessica?

Are there excess Sharons in genitourinary clinics? Foley, E. Willmott, F. Rowen, D. Patel, R and Low, J.L. BMJ 1999; 319: 1615.

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Method

Analysis of patient data over last 10 years in a GU dept

10 girls’ names most commonly encountered were recorded, along with ages

Compared names with census data from 1974

(closest to the mean ages of the named groups in the study population – 22yr)

Analysed using Fisher’s exact, a single sample x2 test

Ranking and frequency of girls’ names

Mean ages of the patients in the GU dept

Frequency in the population for their age group were calculated

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Results

1462 women aged 16-24 attend the GU dept in the study period

Rank in Name Mean age Total (% of National % of birth

clinic (years) all patients) rank cohort

1 Sarah 21.7 55 (3.8) 1 3.8

2 Emma 20.2 35 (2.4) 4 2.3

3 Kelly 20.9 34 (2.3) 47 0.4

4 Louise 19.6 30 (2.0) 13 1.4

5 Claire 21.5 27 (1.8) 2 2.8

6 Lisa 21.3 26 (1.8) 5 2.2

7 Rachel 21.7 23 (1.6) 12 1.4

8 Clare 22.0 22 (1.5) 15 1.1

9 Michelle 21.1 17 (1.2) 7 1.8

10 Nicola 21.4 16 (1.1) 3 2.6

30 Sharon 22.4 7 (0.48) 17 1.0

35 Tracey 22.8 5 (0.34) 26 0.78

62 Sandra 22.0 1 (0.07) 73 0.25

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Potential Criticisms

Population

Sample

Sampling

Names

Comparison Source

Bias