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PLC Universal Design for Learning Strategies : CHAMPS Formative Assessment Vocabulary

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  1. PLC Universal Design for Learning Strategies: CHAMPS Formative Assessment Vocabulary By Myssi Turner Beginning July 29, 2009

  2. Learning Targets • I can develop group norms that will enable my PLC to work efficiently and effectively to improve student success. • I can describe my life through nonlinguistic and linguistic representations. Activity: All About Me Book. • I can use Universal Design for Learning strategies that enable every learner to become proficient and beyond. • I can implement vocabulary strategies and formative assessment into unit plans to ensure my students are totally engaged. • I can use CHAMPS to design a school wide discipline plan to ensure my students are totally engaged. We will begin this journey today and finish what time does not permit during PLC times.

  3. A Universal Design for Learning Approach One size fits most, does not apply in education! What is Universal Design for Learning? • In today's schools, the mix of students is more diverse than ever. Educators are challenged to teach all kinds of learners to high standards, yet a single classroom may include students who struggle to learn for any number of reasons. (Please read the article.)

  4. http://montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/hiat/udl/UDL_intro.pdfhttp://montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/hiat/udl/UDL_intro.pdf video The goal of education in the 21st century is not simply the mastery of knowledge. It is the mastery of learning. Education should help turn novice learners into expert learners—individuals who know howto learn, who want to learn, and who, in their own highly individual ways, are well prepared for a lifetime of learning.

  5. Universal Design for Learning helps meet the challenge of diversity by suggesting flexible instructional materials, techniques, and strategies that empower educators to meet these varied needs. A universally designed curriculum is designed from the outset to meet the needs of the greatest number of users, making costly, time-consuming, and after-the-fact changes to curriculum unnecessary. http://www.cast.org/publications/UDLguidelines/version1.html Video

  6. Three primary principles guide UDL—and provide structure for these Guidelines: Principle I: Provide Multiple Means of Representation (the “what” of learning). Visual presentations like www.unitedstreaming.com, enlarged print, audio text support, movie maker, PowerPoint, internet links, access to sound clips, definitions, or pictures

  7. Principle II: Provide Multiple Means of Expression (the “how” of learning). Graphic outlining tools, keyboarding with spelling support, multimedia books, product models, drawing, video or photos, collages, graphs

  8. Principle III: Provide Multiple Means of Engagement (the “why” of learning). Provide learning choices: Audio, visual, hands-on Webquests Project based inquiry Cooperative learning projects Multimedia projects; Teachertube.com

  9. With Compass Learning we will be able to design skills to students based on their RIT band scores: G/T, Spec. Ed. http://lessonbuilder.cast.org/window.php?src=videos

  10. CHAMPS Review

  11. Greatness is not something to strive for, rather it is something to look for in others. Find something positive about every student in your classroom on a daily basis!

  12. What is C.H.A.M.P.s?? • CHAMPs is a decision-making template to assist educators in developing a classroom management plan and implementing it successfully. • CHAMPs provides a common vocabulary for all to use in the promotion of a positive, learning centered culture.

  13. The CHAMPs approach is centered around proactive, positive steps taken by teachers in the classroom. It preserves individual preferences and respects teacher competence.

  14. Guidelines for Success – The 5 P’s • Prompt– Be on time. • Prepared– Have your materials and completed assignments out and ready at the start of class. • Productive - On task and actively involved in the learning process. • Polite - Show respect to self, others and property. • Positive– Be optimistic about learning.

  15. The goal of positive behavior support is not “perfect” children. Rather, the goal should be the perfect environment for enhancing their growth. -John Marzano

  16. Motivation “Motivating is like bathing – if you only do it once, it isn’t that effective.” -Golom

  17. The Big Picture  An effective classroom management plan is similar to space travel in that both must address:  Vision and high expectations  Structure and organization  Procedures to energize and reinforce  Procedures for course corrections

  18. The Big Picture  Our students are with us on this journey.  The students who are motivated and responsible are like crew members.  The students who are responsible, but not terribly motivated are like passengers.

  19. BEGIN WITH THE END IN MIND…. Vision: When you know where you are headed, you can guide students toward their own success. Organization: When you have well organized routines and procedures for your classroom, you model and prompt organized behavior from your students. Expectations: When your expectations are clear, students never have to guess how you expect them to behave.

  20. Learning Target: • I can use CHAMPS to design a school wide discipline plan to ensure my students are totally engaged. • Correction Procedures: When you treat student • misbehavior as an instructional opportunity, you • give students the chance to learn from their • mistakes. • The behavior you attend to the most will be the one that you will see more of in the future. • Classwide Motivation Systems: When you • implement class wide systems appropriate to the • collective needs of your students, you can enhance • student motivation to behave responsibly and strive • for success. http://www.paec.org/fec/details.asp?ID=1714

  21. The CHAMPs Acronym  Conversation: Can students talk to each other during this activity/transition?  Help: How can students ask questions during this activity/transition? How do they get your attention?  Activity: What is the task/objective of this activity/transition? What is the expected end product?  Movement: Can students move about during this activity/transition? Can they sharpen their pencil?  Participation: What does appropriate student work behavior for this activity/transition look/sound like?

  22. Expectations  It is noted that clearly defined behavior expectations are not enough.  Expectations must also be communicated and taught in a 3-step process: 1 Teach your expectations before the activity or transition begins. 2 Monitor student behavior by circulating and visually scanning. 3 Provide feedback during and at the conclusion of the activity. Begin the cycle again for the next activity

  23. The 1st Month: When you teach students how to behave during the 1st month of school, you dramatically increase their chances of having a productive year. See 4th grade presentation Motivation: When you implement effective instruction and positive feedback, you motivate students to demonstrate their best behavior. Monitor & Revise: When you monitor what is actually going on in your classroom, you are able to make adjustments to your Classroom Management Plan that will increase student success. The following slides are examples of how to begin the year.

  24. Welcome to Fourth Grade… Where the Stars Shine! Procedures for a FABUOLOUS Emmy Winning Year!

  25. What Are The Morning Procedures? (CRUSH) • Check in (Move lunch card) • Restroom Break • Unpack • Sharpen Pencil (Choose a sharp pencil out of container) • Homework (Turned into correct basket)

  26. What is CHAMPS? C = Conversation (Can students talk to each other during this activity/transition?) H = Help (How can students get questions answered during this activity/transition? How do they get your attention?) A = Activity (What is the task/objective of this activity/transition? What is the expected end product?) M = Movement (Can students move about during this activity/transition? e.g., Are they allowed to get up to sharpen a pencil?) P = Participation (What does appropriate student behavior for this activity/transition look/sound like? How do students show that they are fully participating?)

  27. VOICE LEVELS • - Whisper • - Partner • - Small Group • - Presentation • - Outdoor / Recess

  28. Lining Up Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Lining Up for Transitions • Movement: • Walk quietly • Participation: • Line Leader will line up first. • Clear your desk. • Your teacher will call one table at a time to line up. The caboose will go to the end of the line at all times.

  29. Hallway Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Hallway Behavior • Movement: • Walk quietly at all times • Participation: • Walk single file on the right side of the hall • Hands at your sides • Do not skip steps • Be courteous to others • Step quietly • No GAPS • If you are the line leader, you must stop at each of the assigned stop areas within the school (I will go over with you)

  30. Restroom Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Find the closest teacher/staff member • Activity: • Restroom Use • Movement: • Walking quietly at all times • Participation: • Enter and exit quietly • Keep hands and feet to yourself • Remember to flush • Wash hands using one or two squirts of soap • Dry hands using one paper towel or the air dryer • Clean up after yourself

  31. Water Fountain Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Find the closest teacher/staff member • Activity: • Quietly get a drink • Movement: • Walking, waiting or drinking quietly • Participation: • Keep hands and feet to yourself • Wait patiently and quietly for your turn • Quickly get a drink

  32. Lunch Room Line Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Lunch line behavior • Movement: • Walking quietly • Participation: • Walk through the line in a single file, facing forward • Be attentive to adults • Make choices in cafeteria line • Pick up napkins, straws, silverware, etc… from the table • Walk to seat

  33. Lunch Room Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 2 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Lunch room behavior • Movement: • Walking, eating, talking, sitting • Participation: • Walk to your table and sit down • Stay in seat • No seat saving • No reminders • Use your manners • Eat your OWN lunch

  34. Lunch Room Dismissal Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Dismissal from the lunchroom • Movement: • Walking quietly • Participation: • Walk in a single file line, facing forward • Keep your hands at your sides or behind your back • Quietly put your tray away • Leave no mess • Line up quietly using lining up procedures

  35. Assembly Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Assembly Behavior • Movement: • Sitting quietly • Participation: • Enter and exit quietly • Keep hands and feet to yourself • Face forward • Keep your legs crossed • Stay on your bottom • Eyes on speaker • Ears listening • Stay seated until dismissed

  36. Playground Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 5 • Help: • Find the closest teacher/staff member • Activity: • Playground behavior • Movement: • Running, walking, playing • Participation • Keep hands and feet to yourself • Ask if you can join a group that is already playing a game • Ask others to join you to play • Take care of playground equipment • Bring in equipment that you take out • Be kind and respectful • Play responsibly • No arguing or fighting

  37. Planner Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Planner Procedures • Movement: • Writing quietly • Participation • Copy assignments from the chart to the planner. • Keep your planner open and raise your hand. • Your teacher will check and initial your planner. • Take your planner and a pencil to your parent. Show them your assignments and have him/her sign or initial your planner. • In the morning, open your planner and leave it open on your desk. • Your teacher will check it during morning work. • If planner is not signed, the student will need to erase their number for the day.

  38. Afternoon Procedures • Conversation: • Voice Level 0 • Help: • Raise your hand • Activity: • Afternoon procedures • Movement: • Writing, walking, packing, checking mailbox • Participation • At 3:00 there is a voice level of 0. • Complete your planner and lay it open on your desk. • Raise your hand and wait quietly until your teacher signs your planner. • Once your planner has been signed, go to your mailbox and place papers on your desk. Then, proceed to your locker and pack to go home. • Sit quietly and work on your homework or read a book until you are called to leave.

  39. Class Expectations • Respect your teachers and classmates • Enjoy learning • Do your best • Cooperate with others • Ask questions • Remember we are a family • Participate in class • Excel at everything you do! • Try your hardest and never give up!

  40. What happens if I don’t make good choices? Consequences: 1st time: Warning, erase number 2nd time: Move number to the sad face 3rd time: Check mark on number, phone call home 4th time: Another check mark, detention

  41. What happens if I do make good choices? If you make good choices, you will be given tickets. You will need to collect these in a ziploc bag that will be stapled to your planner. Once you have collected 20 tickets, you will get to pick a reward from the chance board! There are all kinds of fun things hidden on the board! Good luck! Remember it is YOUR responsibility to keep track of your tickets.

  42. Expectations Outside of the Classroom Behave like shining stars!!!

  43. Final Thoughts! • The kind of year we have is up to you! • If you need ANYTHING, please ask! • If you don’t understand or have a question, ALWAYS ask. Someone else is probably wondering the same thing. • Remember, I am here to help you learn! That is my job. We are a classroom community of learners. • Treat others as you would like to be treated. • We will always be respectful to each other. You will probably spend more time with your “school family” than you will spend at home with your family during the school week. • I have high expectations and will always expect your best. In return, I will always give you my best.

  44. CHAMPS •  Long-Range Classroom Goals •  Guidelines for Success •  Positive Expectations •  Family Contacts •  Professionalism •  Behavior Management Practices •  Level of Classroom Structure

  45. Learning Target: • I can use CHAMPS to design a school wide discipline plan to ensure my students are totally engaged. • Organization •  Daily Schedule •  Physical Space •  Attention Signal- Give me five! Clapping •  Beginning and Ending Routines •  Classroom Rules •  Student Work •  Classroom Management Plan

  46. Organization: Classroom Rules Example rules: •  Arrive on time with all of your materials. •  Keep hands, feet, and objects to yourself. •  Work during all work times. •  Follow directions immediately.

  47. Your Role… • Work with your PLC to come up with rules and consequences that we will use school wide in every classroom. One person needs to record ideas to share out on the poster paper. • Next, we will work to have one classroom management method. For example: everyone’s name/number placed on the  side daily. Then erased for breaking rule. See handout.

  48. Guide Lines: • No more than 5- 6 simply stated rules and consequences • Must be proactive- state the positive, like please walk in the classroom, hallway, etc. • Consequences cannot include recess • Detentions can be used, think about your grade level taking turns • K/1 can have a separate behavior plan than 2-5

  49. Formative Assessment Assessment for learning

  50. Formative Assessment --any practice which provides information to pupils about what to do to improve --any practice which takes the ‘what to improve’ into ‘how to improve’ --is part of effective planning --focuses on how pupils learn --is central to classroom practice --is a key professional skill --fosters motivation