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Menus, Meal Patterns, and Foods Used in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) PowerPoint Presentation
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Menus, Meal Patterns, and Foods Used in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

Menus, Meal Patterns, and Foods Used in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

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Menus, Meal Patterns, and Foods Used in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

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  1. Menus, Meal Patterns, and FoodsUsed in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) New Applicant and Annual Training A Proud Sponsoring Organization of the Child and Adult Care Food Program

  2. What’s in a Meal? Meal Patterns A meal pattern is a set of food components, food items, and minimum quantities required for breakfast, lunch, supper or snack for a specific age group of children. Meal Components Depending on the meal served, meal components will be made up of 2 or more of the following: • Milk • Meat and Meat Alternates • Vegetables and Fruits • Grains and Breads

  3. Age Groups for CACFP Meal Patterns • An important step in planning and preparing meals through the CACFP is determining the age group (or groups) you will be serving and selecting the correct meal pattern for these children. • The age groups are designed to reflect the differing nutritional needs of children. • For children ages 1 through 12 years old, the CACFP meal pattern is divided into these age groups: • Ages 1 through 2 years • Ages 3 through 5 years • Ages 6 through 12 years

  4. Breakfast Meal ComponentsAll components must be served as a unit • The milk requirement is met with fluid milk only. • Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength. • Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain or enriched or fortified.

  5. Lunch/Supper Meal Components All components must be served as a unit • Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength. • Breads and grains must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour. Cereal must be whole-grain or enriched or fortified. • Nuts and seeds may meet only one-half of the total meat/meat alternate serving and must be combined with another meat/meat alternate to fulfill the lunch or supper requirement. • Meat serving requirements are edible portions

  6. AM/PM Snack ComponentsAll components must be served as a unit • Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength.  Juice cannot be served when milk is the only other snack component. • Yogurt counts as a meat/meat alternate – NOT milk

  7. Milk GuidelinesMust be Fluid 8 oz 6 oz 4 oz “Make sure your serving cup size is large enough for the required amount for each age group.”

  8. Meal Components Overview • Serve two or more kinds of vegetable(s) and/or fruit(s). Full-strength (100%) vegetable or fruit juice may only be used for half of the requirement. • Grain/Breads must be whole-grain or enriched • Meat serving requirements are edible portions • Yogurt counts as a meat/meat alternate – NOT milk. • The milk requirement is met with fluid milk only. • Fruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength.  Juice cannot be served when milk is the only other snack component

  9. Grains/BreadsAll must be Whole-grain or Enriched  Creditable Grains / Breads  Non-Creditable Buns Rolls Rice Biscuits Muffins Pasta Noodles Cereal Cornbread Corn/cornmeal chips (*must use whole grain or enriched flours*) Potatoes Tater tots Hash browns French fries Chicken/meat breading Ice cream cones Popcorn Non Creditable foods are those foods that do not count toward meeting meal pattern requirements.

  10. Vegetables/FruitsFruit or vegetable juice must be full-strength  Creditable Vegetables & Fruits  Non-Creditable 100% Juice Blends Baked Beans Dried Fruit ¼ cup per serving Fruit Cobblers/pies Onion Rings Pickles Spaghetti Sauce or Tomato Sauce must serve at least 1/8 cup Gelatin w/ at least 1/8 cup of fruit per serving Apple Butter Jams and Jelly Cake containing fruit or vegetables Corn chips (not classified as Vegetable) Fruit “Drinks” Ketchup Lemon pie filling Lemonade Cranberry cocktail Pop tart filling Non-Creditable Foods are those foods that do not count toward meeting meal pattern requirements.

  11. Meat/Meat Alternates  Creditable Meat/Meat Alt.  Non-Creditable Meat, Poultry or Fish Eggs Cheese, Cheese foods & spreads Beans Yogurt Corn dogs Nuts & Seeds w/ a 4 to 8 oz serving (depending on age) 1 oz Shelled peanuts is about 35 pieces (for lunch and supper no more than 50% of the requirement may be met with nuts or seeds) Hot Dogs Peanut butter (it is suggested that peanut butter be served in combination with another M/MA since the required portion size (2Tbsp) may be to large) Bacon Potted meat Cream cheese & Powdered/Imitation cheese Commercial Pizza Canned or frozen: Beef-a-Roni, Raviolis & Pot pies Pepperoni Tofu Soy Burgers* Soy Hot Dogs* * Alternate protein products (APP) must have CN labeling & should be documented at the center. All documentation MUST be submitted to sponsor* Chicken Noodle Soup Egg whites/substitutes Non-Creditable Foods are those foods that do not count toward meeting meal pattern requirements.

  12. Homemade & Enhanced Foods“Some Non-creditable foods can become creditable when prepared at center using sufficient quantities and component(s) or enhanced with the appropriate component(s) per serving.” Examples of Enhanced Foods: • Frozen Pizza + Cheese or Meat topping = 1 serving G/B & 1 serving M/MA • Can Raviolis + Meat balls = 1 serving G/B & 1 serving M/MA Examples of Homemade Foods: • Commercial Chicken Potpie = Non-creditable (Do not contain adequate amounts of meat) • Homed Chick Potpie = Creditable (Made at center the potpie can be credited, if there is sufficient meat/meat alternate per serving) *indicate Homemade Foods on Menu by writing (H.M.) next to Homemade item(s)*

  13. Other Non-Creditable Foods • Potato Chips • Pudding • Ice Cream • Candy • Soft Drinks • Bacon Bits • Barbecue Sauce • Butter/Margarine • Coconut • Kool Aide • Salad Dressing Non-Creditable Foods are those foods that do not count toward meeting meal pattern requirements.

  14. Remember That… • Fruit Cocktail, Mixed Vegetables, and Tossed Salad count as only one V/F serving. • Cooked Dry Beans and Peas May be counted either as a vegetable or as a meat alternate but not as both in the same meal. • Potatoes are a vegetable and credit as a V/F (not as G/B)

  15. When in Doubt Measure it OUT! • Always check the nutritional information label • If there is no nutritional information label available, measure the item using measuring cups • Here are some easy comparisons to help you figure out servings: • 1.5 oz cheese = 3 stacked dice • 1 oz of process cheese = 1 pre packaged slice or 1 string cheese • 1 cup of cereal = 2 hands cupped together • 2 Tbsp of Peanut butter = golf ball • 1 oz of lunch meat = Compact Disc

  16. Menus • Must be dated and posted in plain view • Kept up to date with any substitutions or changes

  17. Infant Meal Pattern A Proud Sponsoring Organization of the Child and Adult Care Food Program

  18. Infant Meal Pattern by Age • Birth through 3 months • 4 months through 7 months • 8 months through 11 months

  19. LUNCH INFANT MEAL PATTERNS 6 WEEKS TO 3 MONTHS A child care center may claim reimbursement for infants 6 weeks to 3 months regardless of who provides the formula or breast milk (parent or child care center).

  20. FEDERAL REGULATIONSCFR 226.20 (b) **For infants 4 through 7 months of age, solid foods are optional and should be introduced ONLY if the infant is developmentally ready** “An infant’s development does not always match the infant’s chronological age. By offering a range of portion sizes and optional foods, the infant meal pattern acknowledges that infants grow at different rates, and that some infants will be developmentally ready for solid foods earlier, or later, than others. Some food items, such as fruits, vegetables, and cereals, are listed as options in the infant meal pattern to take into account an infant’s readiness to accept these foods”.

  21. LUNCH INFANT MEAL PATTERNS 8 MONTHS TO 11 MONTHS The infant MUST be offered: Formula or breast milk, and Infant cereal and/or meat-meat alternate, and Fruit and/or vegetable

  22. 1 Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified.2 Breast milk or formula, or portions of both, may be served; however, it is recommended that breast milk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months.3 For some breastfed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breast milk per feeding, a serving of less than the minimum amount of breast milk may be offered, with additional breast milk offered if the infant is still hungry.4 A serving of this component is required when the infant is developmentally ready to accept it.

  23. 1 Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified.2 Breast milk or formula, or portions of both, may be served; however, it is recommended that breast milk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months.3 For some breastfed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breast milk per feeding, a serving of less than the minimum amount of breast milk may be offered, with additional breast milk offered if the infant is still hungry.4 A serving of this component is required when the infant is developmentally ready to accept it.

  24. 1Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified.2 Breast milk or formula, or portions of both, may be served; however, it is recommended that breast milk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months.3 For some breastfed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breast milk per feeding, a serving of less than the minimum amount of breast milk may be offered, with additional breast milk offered if the infant is still hungry.4 A serving of this component is required when the infant is developmentally ready to accept it.5 Fruit juice must be full-strength.6 A serving of this component must be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flour.

  25. INFANT FEEDING REQUIREMENTS • Centers MUST maintain infant menus • Centers MUST provide an approved formula with iron, and an infant cereal fortified with iron

  26. Important Points When Feeding Infants • Make USDA-approved infant formula available at your center, even if parents bring their own • Must have an Infant Formula Choice Form for each infant under one year to notify parents that they have the option of using center’s formula • Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified • Provide at least one component of the meal pattern • Fruit juice must be full strength and pasteurized • Bread/grains must be made with whole-grain or enriched flour