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Tom Peters’ Re-Imagine EXCELLENCE ! HR Summit and Expo 2013/07 October 2013 Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Center (slides at tompeters.com; also see excellencenow.com). 7 Steps to Sustaining Success & Excellence You take care of the people.

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Tom Peters’ Re-Imagine EXCELLENCE ! HR Summit and Expo 2013/07 October 2013


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    1. Tom Peters’ Re-ImagineEXCELLENCE! HR Summit and Expo 2013/07 October 2013 Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Center (slides at tompeters.com; also see excellencenow.com)

    2. 7 Steps to Sustaining Success & Excellence You take care of the people. The people take care of the service. The service takes care of the customer. The customer takes care of the profit. The profit takes care of the re-investment. The re-investment takes care of the re-invention. The re-invention takes care of the future. (And at every step the only measure is EXCELLENCE.)

    3. 7 Steps to Sustaining Success You take care of the people. The people take care of the service. The service takes care of the customer. The customer takes care of the profit. The profit takes care of the re-investment. The re-investment takes care of the re-invention. The re-invention takes care of the future. (And at every step the only measure is EXCELLENCE.)

    4. PART 1: People FIRST

    5. “Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives …

    6. 1/4,096: excellencenow.com “Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives … or it's simply not worth doing.” —Richard Branson

    7. A 15-Point Human Capital Asset Development Manifesto • 1.Corporate social responsibility” starts at home—i.e., inside the enterprise! MAXIMIZING GDD/Gross Domestic Development of the workforce is the primary source of mid-term and beyond growth and profitability—and maximizes national productivity and wealth. • 2. Regardless of the transient external situation, development of “human capital” is always the #1 priority. This is true in general, in particular in difficult times which demand resilience—and uniquely true in this age in which IMAGINATIVE brainwork is de facto the only plausible survival strategy for higher wage nations. (Generic “brainwork,” traditional and dominant “white-collar activities, is increasingly beingperformed by exponentially enhanced artificial intelligence.) • Source: A 15-Point Human Capital Asset Development Manifesto/ • World Strategy Forum/The New Rules: • Reframing Capitalism/Seoul/15 June 2012

    8. “You have to treat your employees like customers.”—Herb Kelleher, upon being asked his “secret to success”Source: Joe Nocera, NYT, “Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer,” on the occasion of Herb Kelleher’s retirement after 37 years at Southwest Airlines (SWA’s pilots union took out a full-page ad in USA Today thanking HK for all he had done) ; across the way in Dallas, American Airlines’ pilots were picketingAA’s Annual Meeting)

    9. "If you want staff to give great service to customers, you must first give great service to staff." —Founder, Zingerman's (food service)

    10. EMPLOYEES FIRST, CUSTOMERS SECOND: Turning Conventional Management Upside Down Vineet Nayar/CEO/HCL Technologies

    11. "When I hire someone, that's when I go to work for them.”—John DiJulius, "What's the Secret to Providing a World-class Customer Experience"

    12. “hostmanship”/ “consideration renovation”

    13. “The path to a hostmanship culture paradoxically does not go through the guest.In fact it wouldn’t be totally wrong to say that the guest has nothing to do with it. True hostmanship leaders focus on their employees. What drives exceptionalism is finding the right people and getting them to love their work and see it as a passion. ... The guest comes into the picture only when you are ready to ask, ‘Would you prefer to stay at a hotel where the staff love their work or where management has made customers its highest priority?’”“We went through the hotel and made a ... ‘consideration renovation.’Instead of redoing bathrooms, dining rooms, and guest rooms, we gave employees new uniforms, bought flowers and fruit, and changed colors.Our focus was totally on the staff.They were the ones we wanted to make happy.We wanted them to wake up every morning excited about a new day at work.” —Jan Gunnarsson and Olle Blohm, Hostmanship: The Art of Making People Feel Welcome.

    14. “ … The guest comes into the picture only when you are ready to ask, ‘Would you prefer to stay at a hotel where the staff love their work or where management has made customers its highest priority?’”

    15. Brand = Talent.

    16. B(I) > B(O)

    17. Our MissionTO DEVELOP AND MANAGE TALENT;TO APPLY THAT TALENT,THROUGHOUT THE WORLD, FOR THE BENEFIT OF CLIENTS;TO DO SO IN PARTNERSHIP; TO DO SO WITH PROFIT.WPP

    18. “In a world where customers wake up every morning asking, ‘What’s new, what’s different, what’s amazing?’ success depends on a company’s ability to unleash initiative, imagination and passion of employees at all levels—and this can only happen if all those folks are connected heart and soul to their work [their ‘calling’], their company and their mission.” —John Mackey and Raj Sisoda, Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business

    19. *2/3 vote by team after 90-days probation for new member to achieve fulltime status *Total transparency re compensation *All 7 members of exec team exact same pay package including bonuses *Cash plus bonuses of highest paid no more than 19X average *Exact same benefits package for all employees including CEO, though adjusted for seniority *Benefits package decided by all hands vote every 3 years —John Mackey and Raj Sisoda, Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business (“Conscious Hiring and Retention Practices”)

    20. PAUSE: “Itisthe game.”

    21. “If I could have chosen not to tackle the IBM culture head-on, I probably wouldn’t have. My bias coming in was toward strategy, analysis and measurement. In comparison, changing the attitude and behaviors of hundreds of thousands of people is very, very hard.Yet I came to see in my time at IBM that culture isn’t just one aspect of the game —IT IS THE GAME.” —Lou Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance

    22. WSJ/0910.13: “What matters most to a company over time, strategy or culture? Dominic Barton, MD, McKinsey & Co.:“Culture.”

    23. “I told my board that if they want to get the share price 50% in 12-18 months, I can do it without raising a sweat. But it will destroy the longterm prospects of the company—and they’ll have to do it without me.”—CEO, large ($10B+) electronic components company

    24. “On the face of it, shareholder value is the dumbest idea in the world. Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy. … Your main constituencies are your employees, your customers and your products.”—Jack Welch, FT, 0313.09, page 1

    25. “LEADERS‘DO’PEOPLE.”

    26. “Tom, you left out one thing …”

    27. “Tom, you left out one thing …Leaders enjoy leading!”

    28. “LEADERS‘DO’ PEOPLE. PERIOD.”—Anon.

    29. Les Wexner:From sweaters to people!* *Limited Brands founder Les Wexner queried on astounding longterm success—said, in effect, it happened because he got as excited about developing people as he had been about predicting fashion trends in his early years

    30. Oath of Office: Managers/Servant Leaders Our goal is to serve our customers brilliantly and profitably over the long haul. Serving our customers brilliantly and profitably over the long haul is a product of brilliantly serving, over the long haul, the people who serve the customer. Hence, our job as leaders—the alpha and the omega and everything in between—is abetting the sustained growth and success and engagement and enthusiasm and commitment to Excellence of those, one at a time, who directly or indirectly serve the ultimate customer. We—leaders of every stripe—are in the “Human Growth and Development and Success and Aspiration to Excellence business.” “We” [leaders] only grow when “they” [each and every one of our colleagues] are growing. “We” [leaders] only succeed when “they” [each and every one of our colleagues] are succeeding. “We” [leaders] only energetically march toward Excellence when “they” [each and every one of our colleagues] are energetically marching toward Excellence. Period.

    31. “No matter what the situation, [the great manager’s] first response is always to think about the individual concerned and how things can be arranged to help that individual experience success.”—Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know

    32. “The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors and actresses canbecome more than they’ve ever been before, more than they’ve dreamed of being.” —Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech

    33. LEADERSHIP IS A SACRED TRUST.**President, classroom teacher, CEO, shop foreman

    34. "Leadership is a gift. It's given by those who follow. You have to be worthy of it.” —General Mark Welsh, Commander, U.S. Air Forces Europe

    35. The Memories That Matter

    36. The Memories That Matter The people you developed who went on to stellar accomplishments inside or outside the company. The (no more than) two or three people you developed who went on to create stellar institutions of their own. The long shots (people with “a certain something”) you bet on who surprised themselves—and your peers. The people of all stripes who 2/5/10/20 years later say “You made a difference in my life,” “Your belief in me changed everything.” The sort of/character of people you hired in general. (And the bad apples you chucked out despite some stellar traits.) A handful of projects (a half dozen at most) you doggedly pursued that still make you smile and which fundamentally changed the way things are done inside or outside the company/industry. The supercharged camaraderie of a handful of Great Teams aiming to “change the world.”

    37. “Unremarkable” except for RESULTS: Superb people developer (her/his folks invariably amazed at what they’ve accomplished!)

    38. “Among the most effective leaders I have encountered and worked with in half a century, some have locked themselves into their offices and others were ultra-gregarious. Some were quick and impulsive, some studied the situation and took forever to come to a decision. The one and only personality trait the effective ones did have in common was something they did not have: They had little or no ‘charisma,’ and little use for the term.” —Peter Drucker, in Susan Cain, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    39. The Memories That Matter Unalloyed pleasure in being informed of the fallaciousness of your beliefs by someone 15 years your junior and several rungs below you on the hierarchical ladder. Selflessness. (A sterling reputation as “a guy always willing to help out with alacrity despite personal cost.”) As thoughtful and respectful, or more so, toward thine “enemies” as toward friends and supporters. Always and relentlessly put at the top of your list/any list being first and foremost “of service” to your internal and external constituents. (Employees/Peers/ Customers/Vendors/Community.) Treated the term “servant leadership” as holy writ. (And “preached” “servant leadership” to others—new “non-managerial” hire or old pro, age 18 or 48.)

    40. Promotion

    41. 2/year = Legacy

    42. “The ONE Question”:“In the last year [3 years, current job], name the … three people … whose growth you’ve most contributed to. Please explain where they were at the beginning of the year, where they are today, and where they are heading in the next 12 months. Please explain … in painstaking detail … your development strategy in each case. Please tell me your biggest development disappointment—looking back, could you or would you have done anything differently? Please tell me about your greatest development triumph—and disaster—in the last five years. What are the ‘three big things’ you’ve learned about helping people grow along the way?”

    43. Promotion Decisions“life and death decisions”Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management

    44. “A man should never be promoted to a managerial position if his vision focuses on people’s weaknessesrather than on their strengths.”—Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management

    45. “I can’t tell you how many times we passed up hotshots for guys we thought were better people … and watched our guys do a lot better than the big names, not just in the classroom, but on the field—and, naturally, after they graduated, too. Again and again, the blue chips faded out, and our little up-and-comers clawed their way to all-conference and All-America teams.”—Bo Schembechler (and John Bacon), “Recruit for Character,” Bo’s Lasting Lessons

    46. Evaluation

    47. EVALUATING PEOPLE = #1 DIFFERENTIATORSource: Jack Welch/Jeff Immelt on GE’s #1 strategic skill (!!!!)

    48. “In most companies, the Talent Review Process is a farce. At GE, Jack Welch and his two top HR people visit each division for a day. They review the top 20 to 50 people by name. They talk about Talent Pool strengthening issues.The Talent Review Process is a contact sport at GE;it has the intensity and the importance of the budget process at most companies.”—Ed Michaels, War for Talent

    49. Self-evaluation

    50. “To develop others, start with yourself.”—Marshall Goldsmith