bell work do seasons effect people s moods at least 50 words n.
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Bell work: Do seasons effect people’s moods? (At least 50 words.). Objective: Students will analyze word choice, setting, mood, and characterization by annotating the opening paragraphs of “The Scarlet Ibis.” .

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Objective:Students will analyze word choice, setting, mood, and characterization by annotating the opening paragraphs of “The Scarlet Ibis.”

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CCSSRL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of several word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

close reading
Close Reading

Read the opening paragraph of “The Scarlet Ibis.”Annotate the first paragraph paying special attention to Hurst’s choice of words and details about the setting.What mood is established in this opening paragraph?

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It was in the clove of seasons, summer was dead but autumn had not yet been born, that the ibis lit in the bleeding tree. The flower garden was stained with rotting brown magnolia petals and ironweeds grew rank amid the purple phlox. The five o'clocks by the chimney still marked time, but the oriole nest in the elm was untenanted and rocked back and forth like an empty cradle. The last graveyard flowers were blooming, and their smell drifted across the cotton field and through every room of our house, speaking softly the names of our dead. It's strange hat all this is still so clear to me, now that that summer has since fled and time has had its way. A grindstone stands where the bleeding tree stood, just outside the kitchen door, and now if an oriole sings in the elm, its song seems to die up in the leaves, a silvery dust.

grindstone
Grindstone

a type of millstone used to grind grains such as wheat

bleeding tree
Bleeding Tree

A “bleeding tree” is one that has a condition known as gummosis. It causes the tree to “bleed” sap through its bark. This condition is a symptom of several possible diseases, and is commonly seen in both pines and fruit trees. An early warning sign that something else is wrong, gummosis doesn't necessarily mean that the tree will die, but it does mean that you should take a closer look to see what's causing the bleeding

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Objective:Students will explore the concept of the unreliable narrator by using Cornell notes to find textual evidence in “The Scarlet Ibis.”

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CCSSRI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
more on 1 st person narratives
More On 1st Person Narratives

The narrator in a 1st person narrative is often called a persona.

A persona in the word's everyday usage is a social role or a character played by an actor. The word is derived from Latin, where it originally referred to a theatrical mask.

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Unreliable NarratorsThe unreliable narrator is a narrator who can't be trusted. Either from ignorance or self-interest, this narrator speaks with a bias, makes mistakes, or even lies. Part of the pleasure and challenge of the 1st person narrator stories is finding the truth, and understanding why the narrator is not straightforward.

scarlet ibis cornell notes
“Scarlet Ibis” Cornell Notes

Original Text My Inferences

So what…

Remember that your purpose for reading is to make observations about whether or not the narrator in the story is a unreliable narrator.

objective
Objective:

Students will conduct a character trial by using a graphic organizer to support their claims with textual evidence.

literary definition of motivation
Literary Definition of Motivation

Motivation

A reason that explains why a character behaves in a certain way.

legal definition of murder
Legal Definition of Murder

1st degree murder: The killing of a human being by a sane person, with intent, malice aforethought (prior intention to kill the particular victim or anyone who gets in the way) and with no legal excuse or authority. In those clear circumstances, this is first degree murder.

2nd Degree murder: The killing of a human being without premeditation, as in the heat of passion or in a sudden quarrel or fight. Malice in second degree murder may be implied from a death due to the reckless lack of concern for the life of others (such as firing a gun into a crowd or bashing someone with any deadly weapon). Depending on the circumstances and state laws, murder in the first or second degree may be chargeable to a person who did not actually kill, but was involved in a crime with a partner who actually did the killing or someone died as the result of the crime.

Manslaughter: the unlawful killing of another person without premeditation

bell work
Bell Work:
  • People leave time capsules, or containers with their personal mementos, so people in the future can discover what life and people were like years ago.
    • If we were creating a class time capsule, what would you put into it that describes who you are? How does this object represent you? If there is a story behind this object, what is it?
objective1
Objective:

Students will understand the use of symbols and analyze their use in several literary texts using semantic feature analysis.

what is a symbol

What is a symbol?

A symbol is a word, place, character, or object that means something beyond what it is on a literal level.

Authors use symbolism to emphasize important ideas in a story or text.

how are symbols used

How are symbols used?

Symbolism allows people to communicate beyond the limits of language

Humans use symbolism all the time. Words themselves are mere symbols for something else.

Ex: White flag represents surrender

strategies to use when searching for symbols

Strategies to use when searching for symbols

Pay special attention to objects or places accompanied by a lengthy description, repetition, or special placement.

 Analyze the title.

List objects mentioned more than once.

strategies to use when searching for symbols1

Strategies to use when searching for symbols

List objects that appear at crucial moments.

Consider what the author is trying to say and how it relates to the concrete objects or ideas in the text. Is there a link between the message and the object or idea?

is the b leeding t ree a symbol
Is “the bleeding tree” a symbol?
  • The bleeding tree represents Doodle
  • Concrete: Like the tree the bleeds a red sap, we see Doodle bleeding at the end of the story
  • Figurative: There is an underlying issues (like the disease in this tree) that will eventually lead to Doodle’s death
the rose that grew from concrete tupac shakur
The Rose that Grew from ConcreteTupacShakur

Did you hear about the rose that grewfrom a crack in the concrete? Proving nature's law is wrong it learned to walk without having feet. Funny it seems, but by keeping its dreams, it learned to breathe fresh air. Long live the rose that grew from concretewhen no one else ever cared.