Differentiating professional development principals and leaders roles
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Differentiating Professional Development Principals’ and Leaders’ Roles. Steve Barkley Executive Vice President Performance Learning Systems sbarkley@plsweb.com http://www.plsweb.com/resources/blogs/. Analysis.

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Differentiating Professional DevelopmentPrincipals’ and Leaders’ Roles

Steve Barkley

Executive Vice President

Performance Learning Systems

sbarkley@plsweb.com

http://www.plsweb.com/resources/blogs/


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Analysis

  • Identify classrooms in your school that are closest to full implementation of your vision for learning.

  • Describe in detail the observable students behaviors.

  • Describe in detail the observable teacher behaviors.


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Analysis

  • Identify classrooms in your school that must change the most to reach full implementation of your vision for learning.

  • Describe in detail the observable students behaviors.

  • Describe in detail the observable teacher behaviors.


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Appraise

  • Consider one area of teacher practice that is crucial to your desired student achievement. Rank your classrooms along this continuum.

  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

  • Most Full

  • Change Implementation

  • Needed


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Analysis

  • Consider the bottom half of the implementation continuum. You might want to select one area… What skills do teachers in those classrooms need to internalize in order to obtain the student behaviors you desire?


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Evaluation/Appraisal

  • Select one skill set that you believe is most important. ________________

  • Rank teachers according to this system:

  • Unwilling

  • Unaware

  • Getting Ready

  • Started

  • Developing


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Gordon’s SkillDevelopment LadderThe Art of Teaching

Unconsciously

Talented

Unconsciously Skilled

Consciously

Skilled

Consciously

Unskilled

Unconsciously

Unskilled

  • Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Ladder



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Analysis

  • What is needed for the teachers at each spot ?

  • Unwilling

  • Unaware

  • Getting Ready

  • Started

  • Developing


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What’s needed? Who provides it?

EVALUATION

Outside Criteria

MENTORING

SUPERVISION

PEER COACHING

Teacher’s Choice


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KEY ELEMENTS

  • KNOWLEDGE

  • MODEL

  • PRACTICE

  • OBSERVATION WITH FEEDBACK

  • ONGOING COACHING

  • Joyce and Showers


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KNOWLEDGE

  • WHY

  • RESEARCH

  • FORMAL

  • INFORMAL

  • HOW TO

  • COMPLEX to SIMPLE


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MODEL

Environment

Skills


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PRACTICE

  • SAFE ENVIRONMENT

  • FEEDBACK

  • Twenty to thirty repetitions

  • over an eight to ten week period.


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Two Opportunities for Observation with Feedback

  • Practice Environment:

  • ex. Workshops

  • Classroom Situations:

  • ex. Coaching


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Joyce/Showers Research

Figure 5.2

Training Components and Attainment of Outcomes

in Terms of Percent of Participants

— OUTCOMES —

Components

Study of Theory

Demonstrations

Practice

Peer Coaching

Knowledge

(thorough)

10

30

60

95

Skill

(strong)

5

20

60

95

Transfer

(executive implementation)

0

0

5

95

Beverly Joyce and Bruce Showers (2002) Student Achievement Through Staff Development 3rd Edition. Ch. 5: Designing Training and Peer Coaching: Our Needs for Learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development


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Understanding the Connection…

  • In order to see the link between teacher behavior and student achievement let’s use an example of:

  • Higher Order Questioning Strategies



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Higher Order Questioning: questioningSkill Analysis

  • Teacher Behavior(T1)

  • Write questions into plans and start asking questions in class discussion

Student Response


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Higher Order Questioning: questioningSkill Analysis

  • Teacher Behavior(T1)

  • Write questions into plans and start asking questions in class discussion

Student Response (S1)

Confusion, Reluctant to respond


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  • T1 Write questions into plans and start asking questions in class discussion

  • T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking;


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  • T1:Write questions, questioning

  • start asking;

  • T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking;

  • T3:Provides encouragement, probing, pausing;

  • S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;

  • S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;

  • S3:Successfully responds;


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  • T1:Write questions, questioning

  • start asking;

  • T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking;

  • T3:Provides encouragement, probing, pausing;

  • T4:Withhold recognition for correct answers, cause students to assess each other and dialogue;

  • S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;

  • S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;

  • S3:Successfully responds;

  • S4:Students debate;


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  • T1:Write questions, questioning

  • start asking;

  • T2:Continue asking, increase wait time, model thinking;

  • T3:Provides encouragement, probing, pausing;

  • T4:Withhold recognition for correct answers, cause students to assess each other and dialogue;

  • T5:Provide supportive and conflicting data;

  • S1:Confusion, reluctant to respond;

  • S2:Attempt to answer posed questions;

  • S3:Successfully responds;

  • S4:Students debate;

  • S5:Students pose higher level questions;


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Higher Order Questioning questioning

Student Responses

Teacher Behavior Changes

Student Achievement


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Professional Development in questioningTeacher Behavior…

…Leads to

Student Achievement