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Post K-12 Readiness Research. Research . What’s Happening? What Do US Employers Need? What Do Colleges Need? What are Future Needs? How do we solve this?. What’s Happening?. We have low expectations for American students:

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research
Research
  • What’s Happening?
  • What Do US Employers Need?
  • What Do Colleges Need?
  • What are Future Needs?
  • How do we solve this?
what s happening
What’s Happening?

We have low expectations for American students:

  • American students rank 25th in math and 21st in science compared to students in 30 industrialized countries
  • America’s top math students rank 25th out of 30 countries when compared with top students elsewhere in the world
  • By the end of 8th grade, U.S. students are two years behind in the math being studied by peers in other countries
  • Sixty eight percent of 8th graders can’t read at their grade level, and most will never catch up.
what s happening1
What’s Happening?

Too many students Drop Out.

Dropping out has dire consequences for society…

  • Dropouts from the class of 2007 will cost our nation more than $300 billion in lost wages, lost taxes and lost productivity.
    • Dropouts contribute about $60,000 less in federal and state income taxes. Each cohort of dropouts costs the U.S. $192 billion in lost income and taxes.
    • Sixty five percent of U.S. convicts are dropouts and lack of education is one of the strongest predictors of criminal activity.
    • A dropout is more than eight times as likely to be in jail or prison as a high school graduate and nearly 20 times as likely as a college graduate.
    • For each additional year of schooling, the odds that a student will someday commit a crime like murder or assault are reduced by almost one-third.
    • Each year, the U.S. spends $9,644 per student compared to $22,600 per prison inmate.
    • Increasing the high school completion rate by just one percent for all men ages 20 to 60 would save the U.S. up to $1.4 billion per year in reduced costs from crime.

http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/FINAL_REPORT_PDF09-29-06.pdf

employers
Employers

What Deficiencies do Employers See?

  • In collaboration, The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, and the Society for Human Resource Management conducted an in-depth study of the corporate perspective on the readiness of new entrants into the U.S. workforce by level of educational attainment.
  • Four hundred thirty-one employers, representing a combined workforce of over 2million U.S. based employees, responded to the survey (a response rate of 4.8 percent).
  • Underwriters:
    • Dell
    • Ford Foundation
    • MircoSoft
    • Pearson Education
    • Phillip Morris
    • State Farm
employers1
Employers

Employers See Inadequacies in both Basic Skills and Applied Skills

  • Basic Knowledge refers to (1) basic skills—English Language (spoken), Reading Comprehension, Writing in English, and Mathematics, and 2) other academic subjects: Science, Government, Economics, Humanities/Arts, Foreign Languages, and History/Geography. These are the basic skill and knowledge areas normally acquired in school and, for the most part, are the core academic subjects identified by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
  • Applied SkillsApplied skills include those based on cognitive abilities such as Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, as well as more social and behavioral skills such as Professionalism/Work Ethic. Some of the other applied skills, such as Oral Communications and Teamwork/Collaboration, combine both cognitive abilities and social skills.
employers2
Employers

Many Report “Deficiencies” in 3 Basic Skills:

  • Writing in English—72.0 percent of employer respondents rate new entrants with a high school diploma as “deficient.” Almost half (49.4 percent) of them say basic Writing in English, including grammar and spelling, are “very important” for high school graduates’ successful job performance.
  • Mathematics—53.5 percent of employer respondents report high school graduate entrants as “deficient.” Almost one-third of respondents (30.4 percent) say knowledge of Mathematics is “very important” for this group of entrants.
  • Reading Comprehension —38.4 percent of employer respondents report high school graduate entrants as “deficient.” Nearly two-thirds of respondents (62.5 percent) say Reading Comprehension is “very important” for high school graduate entrants’ success in the workforce.
employers3
Employers
  • Many Report “Deficiencies” 3 Applied Skills:
    • Written Communications—80.9 percent of employer respondents report high school graduate entrants as “deficient.” More than half (52.7 percent) say Written Communications, which includes writing memos, letters, complex reports clearly and effectively, is “very important” for high school graduates’ successful job performance
    • Professionalism/Work Ethic—70.3 percent of employer respondents report high school graduate entrants as “deficient.” Professionalism/Work Ethic, defined as “demonstrating personal accountability, effective work habits, e.g., punctuality, working productively with others, time and workload management” is rated “very important” for high school graduates’ successful job performance by 80.3 percent of employer respondents.
    • Critical Thinking/Problem Solving—69.6 percent of employer respondents report high school graduate entrants as “deficient.” More than half of the employer respondents (57.5 percent) indicate that Critical Thinking/Problem Solving abilities are “very important” to successful performance on the job for this group of new entrants.
employers4
Employers
  • 11. Information Technology Application* ..81.0
  • 12. Creativity/Innovation* . . . . . . 81.0
  • 13. Lifelong Learning/
  • Self Direction* . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78.3
  • 14. Diversity* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71.8
  • 15. Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64.2
  • 16. Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33.4
  • 17. Foreign Languages . . . . . . . . . 21.0
  • 18. Government/Economics . . . . . 19.8
  • 19. History/Geography . . . . . . . . . 14.1
  • 20. Humanities/Arts . . . . . . . . . . . 13.2

Rank Skill

1. Oral Communications* . . . . . . 95.4%

2.Teamwork/Collaboration* . . . 94.4

3. Professionalism/Work Ethic* . 93.8

4. Written Communications* . . . 93.1

5. Critical Thinking/Problem Solving*. . 92.1

6.Writing in English . . . . . . . . . . . 89.7

7. English Language . . . . . . . . . . . 88.0

8. Reading Comprehension . . . . . 87.0

9. Ethics/Social Responsibility* . 85.6

10. Leadership* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81.8

Basic and applied skills rank ordered by percent rating as “very important.” Number of respondents varied for each question, ranging from 382 to 409.

* Indicates an applied skill

future jobs
Future Jobs
  • Medical
    • RNs
    • Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists
    • Physician Assistant
  • Technical Sectors
    • Software Architect
    • Systems Engineer
    • Software Engineer
    • IT Analyst
  • Education Arena
    • College Professors
    • Elementary Teachers
    • High School Teachers
future jobs1
Future Jobs
  • Technical
    • Physical Therapist
    • Assistants, Dental Hygienists
    • Veterinary Technicians
  • Business Services
    • Environmental/Health Services
    • Construction Estimation
    • Sales Jobs
  • Consulting
    • Management
    • Health Care
  • Engineering
    • Project
    • Civil
    • Structural
    • Environmental
    • Bio-Medical
future jobs2
Future Jobs
  • Middle Management
    • Research Development
    • Product Manager
    • Risk Management Manager
future needs
Future Needs

Highest Paying Jobs to 2018 in the USA

According to the US Federal statistics in employment projections to 2018, the US has only seven (7) job titles categories as Very High Wages:

  • Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts. 53+% increase in jobs. Bachelor's degree.
  • Computer Software Engineers, Applications. 34% increase. Bachelor's degree.
  • Management Analysts. 24% increase. Bachelor's or Advanced and work experience.
  • Registered Nurses (RNs). 22.2% increase. Associates degree, 3-yr RN, or 4-yr BSN.
  • Physicians and Surgeons. 21.8% increase. Professional degree(s)
  • Accountants and Auditors - includes Forensic Accounting. 21.7% increase. Bachelor's degree.
  • Postsecondary (College/University/Training) Teachers with a Doctoral Degree. 15% increase.
  • Among the jobs listed above, the first three are involved in IT (Information Technology). two are in Healthcare, one in Accounting, and one in Higher Education. The two IT positions are predicted to increased at much higher rates than any of the others in the list. This is particularly true of the Network Systems occupations and Systems and Software positions appear in Healthcare, Management Analysis, Accounting, and Education as well.
employers also look for
Employers also look for…

Emerging Content Areas

  • Make appropriate choices concerning health and wellness, e.g., nutrition, exercise, stress reduction, work-life effectiveness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76.1%
  • Exercise personal financial responsibility, e.g., balancing a checkbook, budgeting skills, retirement planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71.5
  • Use entrepreneurial skills to enhance workplace productivity and career options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70.5
  • Understand economic issues and the role of business in the U.S. and global economy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60.6
  • Demonstrate understanding of global markets and the economic and cultural effects of globalization . . . . . 52.9
  • Participate effectively in community and government as an informed citizen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 51.0
  • Use non-English languages as a tool for understanding other nations, markets, and cultures . . . . . . . 49.7
future needs1
Future Needs

While the graphic represents each element distinctly for descriptive purposes, the Partnership views all the components as fully interconnected in the process of 21st century teaching and learning.

colleges
Colleges

What Colleges Want From Applicants:

  • Grades in college prep courses (83.4% of colleges evaluate this)
  • Strength of curriculum (65.7%)
  • SAT or ACT scores (59.3%)
  • Grades in all courses (46.2%)
  • Essay or writing sample (26.6%)
  • Student's demonstrated interest in the college (23.0%)
  • Class rank (21.8%)
  • Counselor recommendation (19.4%)
  • Teacher recommendation (19.0%)
  • Subject test score (AP, IB) (9.6%)
  • Source:
  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/03/10-things-colleges-want-f_n_1073451.html#s451126&title=10_Subject_test
  • http://www.ecampustours.com/collegeplanning/applyingforcollege/whatcollegeslookfor
colleges1
Colleges

How do we prepare students for college to address college admittance criteria?

  • Boost SAT scores
  • Boost Math and Science aptitudes

But How??

foreign language boosts sat scores
Foreign Language Boosts SAT Scores
  • Redmond, director of foreign language education and associate professor of education at Wake Forest University, is also the executive secretary of the National Network for Early Language Learning.
    • “Children should start learning a foreign language in kindergarten and continue through high school,” Redmond says. “Learning languages helps increase listening ability, memory, creativity and critical thinking - all of which are thinking processes that increase learning in general.”
    • In addition to developing thinking skills, foreign language study exposes children to other ways of looking at the world, she says.
    • To those who consider foreign language study in elementary school a frill, Redmond stresses that foreign language education supports the core curriculum. When done right, foreign language instruction uses themes that support the elementary curriculum including math, science, social studies and language arts.
    • Correlation studies show students who have had several years of foreign language do better on SATs, particularly the verbal part,” Redmond says.
    • Becoming fluent in foreign language takes years, although children tend to absorb foreign languages more easily than older students and adults, she says. She emphasizes the importance of an uninterrupted sequence of foreign language study in grades K-12 to gain the level of proficiency needed to communicate with people around the world in other languages.
music education has a p rofound effect on students
Music Education has a Profound Effect on Students

The benefits conveyed by music education can be grouped in four categories:

1. Success in society

  • Secondary students who participated in band or orchestra reported the lowest lifetime and current use of all substances (alcohol, tobacco, illicit drugs). Texas Commission on Drug and Alcohol Abuse Report. Reported in Houston Chronicle, January 1998
  • The very best engineers and technical designers in the Silicon Valley industry are, nearly without exception, practicing musicians. Grant Venerable, "The Paradox of the Silicon Savior," as reported in "The Case for Sequential Music Education in the Core Curriculum of the Public Schools," The Center for the Arts in the Basic Curriculum, New York, 1989

2. Success in school

  • A study of 237 second grade children used piano keyboard training and newly designed math software to demonstrate improvement in math skills. The group scored 27% higher on proportional math and fractions tests than children that used only the math software.
  • Students with coursework/experience in music performance and music appreciation scored higher on the SAT: students in music performance scored 57 points higher on the verbal and 41 points higher on the math, and students in music appreciation scored 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on the math, than did students with no arts participation.College-Bound Seniors National Report: Profile of SAT Program Test Takers. Princeton, NJ: The College Entrance Examination Board, 2001.
  • Data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 showed that music participants received more academic honors and awards than non-music students, and that the percentage of music participants receiving As, As/Bs, and Bs was higher than the percentage of non- participants receiving those grades.
music education
Music Education

3. Success in developing intelligence

  • A research team exploring the link between music and intelligence reported that music training is far superior to computer instruction in dramatically enhancing children's abstract reasoning skills, the skills necessary for learning math and science. Shaw, Rauscher, Levine, Wright, Dennis and Newcomb, "Music training causes long-term enhancement of preschool children's spatial-temporal reasoning," Neurological Research, Vol. 19, February 1997
  • Researchers found that children given piano lessons significantly improved in their spatial- temporal IQ scores (important for some types of mathematical reasoning) compared to children who received computer lessons, casual singing, or no lessons. Rauscher, F.H., Shaw, G.L., Levine, L.J., Wright, E.L., Dennis, W.R., and Newcomb, R. (1997) Music training causes long-term enhancement of preschool children's spatial temporal reasoning. Neurological Research, 19, 1-8.

4. Success in life

  • "Studying music encourages self-discipline and diligence, traits that carry over into intellectual pursuits and that lead to effective study and work habits. An association of music and math has, in fact, long been noted. Creating and performing music promotes self-expression and provides self-gratification while giving pleasure to others. In medicine, increasing published reports demonstrate that music has a healing effect on patients. For all these reasons, it deserves strong support in our educational system, along with the other arts, the sciences, and athletics." Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., Leading Heart Surgeon, Baylor College of Music.
  • "The nation's top business executives agree that arts education programs can help repair weaknesses in American education and better prepare workers for the 21st century." "The Changing Workplace is Changing Our View of Education." Business Week, October 1996.
consider an international baccalaureate ib program
Consider an International Baccalaureate® (IB) Program

What is it?

  • Alternative to the AP model
  • A two-year curriculum first took hold in the United States in private schools. But it is now offered in more than 700 American high schools — more than 90 percent of them public schools — and almost 200 more have begun the long certification process.
  • Many parents, schools and students see the program as a rigorous and more internationally focused curriculum, and a way to impress college admissions officers.
  • To earn an I.B. diploma, students must devote their full junior and senior years to the program, which requires English and another language, math, science, social science and art, plus a course on theory of knowledge, a 4,000-word essay, oral presentations and community service.
consider an international baccalaureate ib program1
Consider an International Baccalaureate® (IB) Program

Diploma Programme curriculum Programme model

  • The curriculum is modeled by a hexagon with six academic areas surrounding the three core requirements.
elite high schools
Elite High Schools
  • High Tech High School, North Bergen, N.J., and High Technology High School, Lincroft, N.J: Both opened the same year, 1991, use the increasingly popular High Tech High name and are magnets emphasizing hands-on learning. But the Lincroft school is run by Monmouth County and Brookdale Community College while the North Bergen school is one of the Hudson County schools of technology.
  • Hunter College High School, New York, N.Y.: One of the city’s legendary public high schools, with a program for 7th to 12th graders administered by Hunter College. It was an all-girls school until it went coed in 1972.
  • Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, Aurora: IMSA is also a state-funded boarding school. It takes 10th through 12th graders and has a strong mentoring program.
elite high schools1
Elite High Schools
  • International Community School, Kirkland, Wash.: Students are selected through a lottery to attend this school, which focuses on international awareness. It is one of the few elite public schools without a selective admissions system. Instead, as happens sometimes, the lottery participants self-select into an academic powerhouse.
  • Maggie L. Walker Governor’s School for Government and International Studies, Richmond, Va.: Unlike the science-math orientation of most of the public elites, thefocus of this school is on world cultures and building students’ leadership skills.
  • Stuyvesant High School, New York, N.Y.: It has been teaching the city’s most academically ambitious students for several generations. It offers about 55 AP courses every semester, and has plenty of courses above that level.
how can prepare students for the future
How can Prepare Students for the Future?
  • Copy the countries Elite High Schools And Magnet Schools
  • IB Curriculum
  • Imbed Technology into Curriculum
  • Foster the belief that child WILL GO to college
  • Longer School Days and Year–Round School
  • Foreign Language Curriculum
  • Music Curriculum
  • Create a Learning Environment that addresses the “rainbow” in every subject to address both Basic and Life Skills