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Questions you may have asked yourself: Why do people suggest that chemicals are bad for us? PowerPoint Presentation
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Questions you may have asked yourself: Why do people suggest that chemicals are bad for us? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Questions you may have asked yourself: Why do people suggest that chemicals are bad for us? Why should I study chemistry? Why do scientists so often say “more study is needed”? Why do scientists bother with studies that have no immediate applications? Can we change lead into gold?. Model.

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Questions you may have asked yourself: Why do people suggest that chemicals are bad for us?


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    Presentation Transcript
    1. Questions you may have asked yourself: • Why do people suggest that chemicals are bad for us? • Why should I study chemistry? • Why do scientists so often say “more study is needed”? • Why do scientists bother with studies that have no immediate applications? • Can we change lead into gold?

    2. Model

    3. 35 Xenon Atoms – Don Eigler - 1989

    4. Carbon Monoxide Man

    5. Solid-Liquid-Gas Simulation

    6. SI Unit Definitions from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    7. The IPK – International Prototype Kilogram

    8. Right Left

    9. 01_T06.JPG

    10. Testing a Scientific Claim – Thinking Critically about a Claim • FLaReS Test (a modification of a more substantial approach): • Falsifiability: Can the claim be proven to be either true or false? • Logical: Arguments supporting the claim must be logical – if any premises in the argument are false, the claim cannot be validated • Reproducible: If based on scientific evidence, the evidence must be reproducible. • Sufficient: The evidence provided must be adequate to support the claim. • The burden of evidence rests with the claimant • Extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence • Evidence based on authority and/or testimony is never adequate • A claim must pass all tests to be considered valid.

    11. Example of FLaReS A psychic claims he can bend a spoon using only the powers of his mind. However, he says he can do so only when the conditions are right; there must be no one with negative energy present. Evaluate this psychic’s claim using the FLaReS test Falsifiable? Logical? Reproducible? Sufficient?