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Unit 3: The Renaissance. 1450-1600. TIMELINE. 1450-1500 Botticelli, La Primavera (1477) Fall of Constantinople (1453) Gutenberg Bible (1456) Columbus Reaches the Americas (1492). 1500-1600 Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (1503). 1500-1600 cont. Michelangelo, David (1504).

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timeline
TIMELINE
  • 1450-1500
    • Botticelli, La Primavera (1477)
    • Fall of Constantinople (1453)
    • Gutenberg Bible (1456)
    • Columbus Reaches the Americas (1492)
slide3
1500-1600
    • Leonardo da Vinci,

Mona Lisa (1503)

1500 1600 cont
1500-1600 cont.
  • Michelangelo,

David (1504)

1500 1600 cont1
1500-1600 cont.
  • Raphael, School of Athens (1505)
slide6
1500-1600 cont.
  • Titian, Venus and the Lute Player (1570)
slide7
1500-1600 cont.
  • William Shakespeare,

Romeo and Juliet

(1596)

  • Martin Luther’s

ninety-five theses,

start of the Protestant Reformation (1517)

  • Council of Trent (1545-63)
  • Elizabeth I, Queen of England (1558-1603)
  • Spanish Armada defeated (1588)
renaissance
“Renaissance”
  • 15th and 16th century Europe known as a “rebirth” or “renaissance” of human activity
generalizations
GENERALIZATIONS
  • Exploration
    • Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Ferdinand Magellan
  • Individualism (“universal man”)
    • Leonardo da Vinci
      • Painter, sculptor, architect, engineer,

scientist, musician

slide10
Humanism
    • The dominant intellectual movement
      • Focused on human life and its accomplishments
      • No concern with Heaven or Hell
      • Even though many were devout religious believers, they were captivated by the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome
      • Intoxicated with beauty of ancient languages – Greek and Latin – and with the literature of antiquity
humanism cont
Humanism cont…
  • Painters and sculptors drawn to subjects from classical literature/mythology
  • Art highlighted depictions of the nude body
    • a favorite theme of antiquity, but an object of shame and concealment during Middle Ages. Medieval artists more concerned with religious symbols rather than lifelike representation
  • Art more concerned in realism
    • Linear persepective – geometrical system for creating an illusion of space and depth.
    • Example: Raphael’s School of Athens
slide12
Example of

Medieval art

example of renaissance art
Example of Renaissance art
  • Raphael, School of Athens (1505)
humanism cont1
Humanism cont…
  • Painters no longer treated the Virgin Mary as a childlike, unearthly creature—they showed her as a beautiful young woman
slide15
Catholic Church
    • Far less powerful, but the Christian church as a whole was still an important musical center
    • The unity of Christendom was exploded

by the Protestant Reformation led by

Martin Luther (1483-1546)

      • Aristocrats and upper middle class now

considered education a status symbol;

hired scholars to teach their kids

      • Church no longer monopolized learning
slide16
Technology
    • Invention of the movable type printing

press by Gutenberg accelerated the

speed of learning

    • Before, books were rare and extremely expensive
    • By 1500, 15-20 million copies of 40,000 editions had been printed in Europe
chapter 1 music in the renaissance
Chapter 1: MUSIC IN THE RENAISSANCE
  • Idea of the “universal man”
    • Every educated person was expected to be musically trained.
music in the ren cont
MUSIC IN THE REN., cont…
  • Musicians worked in churches, courts and towns
    • Churches
      • Church choirs grew
      • Polyphonic music was no longer performed by several soloists, but entire choirs
music in the ren cont1
MUSIC IN THE REN., cont…
  • Courts (where most activity occurred)
    • Kings, princes, dukes competed for best composers
    • Courts had 10-60 musicians
    • Nobility often brought musicians along when traveling
    • Women employed in many Italian courts (late Renaissance)
music in the ren cont2
MUSIC IN THE REN., cont…
  • Towns
    • Musicians played for civic processions, weddings, religious services
    • Higher status and pay than before
    • Composers started seeking credit for their work, unlike the anonymity of the Middle Ages.
music in the ren cont3
MUSIC IN THE REN., cont…
  • Most leading

musicians came

from the Low

Countries (Flanders)

  • Highly sought after,

mostly in Italy, which became center of musical life

characteristics of renaissance music
CHARACTERISTICS OF RENAISSANCE MUSIC
  • Words and Music
    • Vocal more important than instrumental
      • Why?
    • More connection between music and meaning/emotion of the text
      • “When one of the words expresses weeping, pain, heartbreak, sighs, tears and other similar things, let the harmony be full of sadness.” –Zarlino (Renaissance music theorist)
characteristics cont
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • Text Painting
    • Musical representation of specific poetic images.
    • How would you show:
      • “Running” “Descending from Heaven” “Death”
      • What are some other, less obvious ones?
characteristics cont1
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • Music still seems calm and restrained to us.
    • All the emotion and expression in Renaissance music is expressed in moderation, balance
      • No extreme dynamic contrast
      • Little tone color contrast
      • Little rhythmic contrast
characteristics cont2
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • What SHMRFT traits can you fill in so far?
characteristics cont3
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • Texture
    • Polyphonic
      • 4, 5, or 6 voices, nearly equal melodic interest
    • Imitation
      • Each voice presents the same melodic idea in turn (as in a round)
    • Some homophonic texture is used, especially in light music, dances
characteristics cont4
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • Fuller sound
    • Bass register used for first time, increasing number of octaves heard
    • Composers began to think in chords, in addition to individual melodic lines
      • In Middle Ages, entire melody lines thought up one at a time and then combined.
      • In Renaissance, melodies were thought up in relation to how they accompany each other
  • Mild, relaxed
    • Lots of stable, consonant chords, many triads
    • Very little dissonance
characteristics cont5
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • “Golden Age” of a cappella choral music
    • Little instrumental accompaniment
    • 2 Main uses for instruments

1. To duplicate vocal lines to reinforce the sound

2. Play the part of a missing singer

Now what can you add to your SHMRFT traits?

characteristics cont6
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • Rhythm
    • Gentle flow, not sharply defined beat
      • Each melodic line held great rhythmic independence
      • Made it challenging to sing – each singer had to be independently strong
characteristics cont7
CHARACTERISTICS, cont…
  • Melody
    • Melodies generally easy to sing
      • Moves stepwise, few large leaps

And your SHMRFT traits now?

listening to renaissance
LISTENING TO RENAISSANCE
  • Sicut Cervus
    • Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina
vocabulary review
VOCABULARY REVIEW
  • Renaissance
  • Individualism
  • “Universal man”
  • Humanism
  • Realism
  • Linear Perspective
  • Text Painting/Word Painting
  • Imitation
  • Consonance/Dissonance
  • A cappella
unit iii presentations
Technology: Movable Type Printing Press, Gutenberg Bible

Kalyn

Julian

Blake

Jacob

Religion: Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation

Dominique

Phil

Alec

Bilal

Exploration: Columbus, da Gama, Magellan

Kieryn

Claire

Chris

Taimoor

Art: da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael

Emma

Aaron

Sami

Ryan

Literature: William Shakespeare

Anna

Andrew

Nathan

Nick

UNIT III PRESENTATIONS
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