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Disability Etiquette
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  1. Disability Etiquette Tips for Interacting with Individuals with Disabilities

  2. Did You Know… • One in five Americans has a disability • People are sometimes uncomfortable around people with disabilities because they do not know how to act or what to say • Fear of the unknown and lack of knowledge about how to act can lead to uneasiness when meeting a person who has a disability

  3. Expected Outcome • Interact more effectively with people with disabilities • Remove communication barriers and promote understanding and acceptance of individuals with disabilities throughout our community

  4. Attitude & Approach • Always remember that a person with a disability is a person • People with disabilities prefer that you focus on their abilities, not their disabilities • Treat people with disabilities with the same respect and consideration that you have for everyone else • Treat the person as an individual, not as a disability • Use a normal voice when extending a verbal welcome. Do not raise your voice unless requested • The attitude and behaviors of others can be the most difficult barriers for people with disabilities to overcome

  5. Honesty • If you do not understand someone because they have a speech impairment or use a communication aid, do not assume that they do not understand • If you have difficulty understanding them, admit it and try to get someone to translate for you • Honesty is the best policy. In time, you will learn to understand what they are saying

  6. Hidden Disabilities • Not all disabilities are apparent • For example: low vision, seizure disorder, hearing loss, learning disability, head injury, mental illness, etc. • Do not make assumptions about the person or the disability • Remain open-minded

  7. Should I help someone with a disability? • Assist individuals with disabilities when necessary • Do not discourage their active participation • Introduce yourself and offer assistance • Ask how you can help and listen for instructions • Be courteous, but NOT condescending • Do not be offended if your help is not needed • Allow a person DIGNITY to do what he/she wants to do for him/herself

  8. Terminology Tips • People with disabilities are NOT conditions or diseases. They are individual human beings • A person is not an “epileptic,” but rather a “person who has epilepsy” • Whenever possible, make reference to the person first, then the disability • A “person with a disability” rather than a “disabled person” • An “individual with autism” rather than an “autistic individual”

  9. Things to Remember • Treat people as you would like to be treated • Do not show pity for a person in a wheelchair. It makes he/she feel demoralized • People with disabilities are NOT alike and have a wide variety of skills and personalities. We are all individuals! • Emphasize the person, not the disability • Treat adults as adults • Do not patronize or talk down to people with disabilities • People are not conditions. Do not label people with the name of the condition or as part of a disability group. We do not say “the cancerous,” nor should we say “the blind”

  10. General Communication Tips • When talking with a person with a disability, speak directly to that person rather than through a companion or sign language interpreter • When introduced to a person with a disability, it is appropriate to shake hands. People with limited hand use or who wear an artificial limb can usually shake hands. For those who cannot shake hands, touch the person on the shoulder or arm to welcome and acknowledge their presence • When meeting a person with a visual impairment, always identify yourself and others who may be with you • If you offer assistance, wait until the offer is accepted. Then listen to or ask for instructions • Treat adults as adults

  11. More General Communication Tips • Leaning or hanging on a person’s wheelchair is similar to leaning or hanging on a person and is generally considered rude • Listen attentively when you’re talking with a person who has a speech impairment. Be patient and wait for the person to finish, rather than correct or speak for the person • To get the attention of a person with a hearing impairment, tap the person on the shoulder or wave your hand. Look directly at the person and speak clearly, slowly, and expressively to establish if the person can read lips

  12. How do I communicate with someone with a cognitive disability? • Use very clean, specific language • Be patient. Allow the person time to tell or show you what he/she wants • Condense lengthy directions into steps • Use short, concise instructions • Present verbal information at a relatively slow pace, with appropriate pauses for processing time and with repetition if necessary • Provide cues to help with transitions (e.g. “In five minutes we’ll be going to lunch”) • Reinforce information with pictures or other visual images • Use modeling, rehearsing, and role playing • Use concrete rather than abstract language • Limit the use of sarcasm or subtle humor • If you are not sure what to do or say, just ask the person what he/she needs

  13. How do I communicate with someone with a hearing impairment? • Get his/her attention. Make sure your face is in full view before speaking • Let the person take the lead in establishing the communication mode, such as lip reading, sign language, or writing notes • Face the person when you are speaking • Do not chew gum or cover your mouth while talking. It makes speech difficult to understand • Rephrase sentences or substitute words rather than repeat yourself again and again • Speak clearly and at a normal voice level • Communicate in writing, if necessary • Move away from noisy areas or the source of noise (loud air conditioning, loud music, TV, radio, etc.) • Do not stand with bright light (window, sun) behind you. Glare makes it difficult to see your face

  14. How do I communicate with someone with a visual impairment? • When greeting the person, identify yourself and introduce others who may be present • Be descriptive. You may have to help orient people with visual impairments and let them know what’s coming up. If they are walking, tell them if they have to step up or down, let them know if the door is to their right or left, and warn them of possible hazards • Offer to read written information, when appropriate • If you are asked to guide a person with a visual impairment, offer your arm instead of grabbing his/hers • Do not leave the person without excusing yourself first • Do not pet or distract a guide dog. The dog is responsible for its owner’s safety and is always working. It is NOT a pet • It’s okay to use terms like “see you later” when speaking to a person with a visual impairment. The person is likely to express things the same way

  15. Wheelchair Etiquette • Always ask the person using the wheelchair if he/she would like assistance BEFORE you help. It may not be needed or wanted • Do not hang or lean on a person’s wheelchair. It’s his/her personal space • Speak directly to the person in the wheelchair • If a conversation lasts more than a few minutes, consider sitting down or kneeling to get yourself on the same level • Do not patronize the person by patting them on the head • Give clear directions, including distance, weather conditions, and physical obstacles that may hinder the person’s travel • When a person using a wheelchair “transfers” out of the wheelchair to a chair, toilet, car, or bed, do not move the wheelchair out of reaching distance • It’s okay to use terms like “running along” when speaking to a person who uses a wheelchair. The person is likely to express things the same way

  16. Remember… • Our own beliefs and comfort level regarding disabilities have a major impact on how we view, interact, and provide services to individuals with disabilities • People with disabilities are individuals with families, jobs, hobbies, likes, dislikes, difficulties, and successes. While the disability is an integral part of who they are, it alone does not define them. Treat everyone as individuals!

  17. References • St. Mary’s County Commission for People with Disabilities; November 2007 • Disability Awareness, The Rehabilitation Center, Ottawa Ontario- (613)739-5324

  18. Quiz Print the quiz, indicate true or false, & submit to Mary Tennyson • ______ Fear of the unknown and lack of knowledge about how to act can lead to uneasiness when meeting a person who has a disability. • ______ The attitude and behaviors of others can be the most difficult barriers for people with disabilities to overcome. • ______ All disabilities are apparent. • ______ To get the attention of a person with a hearing impairment, tap the person on the shoulder or wave your hand. • ______ Leaning or hanging on a person’s wheelchair is appropriate. • ______ Use concrete rather than abstract language when speaking to someone with a cognitive disability. • ______ If you are asked to guide a person with a visual impairment, offer your arm instead of grabbing his/hers. • ______ Our own beliefs do not impact how we view and interact with individuals with disabilities. • ______ Everyone with a cognitive disability has the same traits. • ______ When speaking to someone with a hearing impairment, speak clearly and at a normal voice level.