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Educational Video Games in the Classroom Vickie Ayotte, Rachael Blom, Erika Richae PowerPoint Presentation
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Educational Video Games in the Classroom Vickie Ayotte, Rachael Blom, Erika Richae

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Educational Video Games in the Classroom Vickie Ayotte, Rachael Blom, Erika Richae

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  1. Educational Video Games in the Classroom Vickie Ayotte, Rachael Blom, Erika Richae Methods We developed this survey for a better understanding of the controversy of having educational video games in the classroom. We researched both the positive sides and negative sides of the topic. We gathered information to create a survey of questions that we though were controversial so that we could see the opinions from a variety of people of the education profession as well as a few others that are not associated with education. Each of us sent the survey via email to ten people. We received feedback within a day and using Microsoft Excel, we created graphs relating to the responses. Most of the open-ended replies were answered thoroughly and the multiple choice, true or false, and yes or no questions were answer competently. Graph #1 The below graph is a representation displaying the ways that video games are considered interactive learning. The main answers to this question was that video games enhance social skills through multi-players or they create collaborating and group decision making. Some people chose both A and B, while others chose none of the above. Conclusion Video games in the classroom are a growing phenomenon in which more teachers are incorporating every day. Through our research, we have discovered both the negative and positive outcomes that video games bring to the classroom. Everyday, technology is becoming more and more prevalent and developed within our schools and homes. Students are becoming more aware of technology and are learning how to use the different devices that are used every day. Technology is becoming the norm where we can connect to the World Wide Web at the grocery store, coffee shop, in our cars, cell phones, and video games. Video games can be considered a tool for differentiated learning and teaching. Many of the educational games include a variety of languages, different levels for each individual’s learning development, and multiple self-quizzes and tests that each student can do on his or her own pace. It is important to know what video game is educationally appropriate and how it will enhance the curriculum and the students’ learning. Many video games are labeled accordingly to the age or grade of the audience. It is an educators responsibility to incorporate video games in a manner where the curriculum content is not depleted. Introduction The use of video games in and out of the classroom is becoming more popular due to the easy access of technology. There are many educational videos games in the classroom that benefit the students academically and physically in many ways, such as enhancing cognitive abilities through a variety of subject matters and problem solving programs. Both individual and special needs children benefit from educational video games by developing motor skills and social skills. Video games also help students develop interest in curriculum who are constantly off task in other areas of the class and subject matter. As a group, we decided to created a survey on Survey Monkey on the topic of whether or not video games in the classroom benefit the students. We sent out thirty surveys and received twenty-five replies back the following day. During our research, we discovered different view points from researchers and educators about implementing educational video games in the classroom. We received positive feedback about how video games develop interest and excitement in the classroom while at the same time learning the required curriculum. However, negative viewpoints included that children spend too much time watching screens such as the television and computer in a day. Another negative opinion suggested that video games are addicting and students can easily become off-task and only focus upon winning the games, not the content intended. Graph #2 The graph below represents whether or not the benefits of incorporating video games in the classroom outweigh the costs of using them in the classroom. About 69% of the responses concluded that the benefits do outweigh the costs. The majority of our research also indicated that the benefits substantially outweigh the costs due to the positive impact it has made on both the teachers and the students. References Anneta, L. A. Serious games: incorporating video games in the classroom. Educause Quarterly. Retrieved May 13, 2008, fromhttp://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/SeriousGamesIncorporating/39986 Boxer, S. Video games: Lessons for a gaming generation. Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved May 13, 2008, fromhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/connected/main.jhtml?xml=/connected/2008/04/26/dlgame126.xml Chaptman, D., et al. Video-games in the classroom. Wisconsin technology network. Retrieved May 14, 2008, from http://wistechnology.com/articles/513/ ELSPA. Unlimited learning-computer and video games in the learning landscape. Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association. Retrieved May 14, 2008, fromhttp://www.elspa.com/assets/files/u/unlimitedlearningtheroleofcomputerandvideogamesint_344.pdf Falcon, M. Video games: bad, but not all bad. USA Today. Retrieved May 13, 2008, from http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/spotlight/2001-01-19-video.htm Hernandez, T. Guest lecture says video games belong in classroom. WMU News. Retrieved May 13, 2008, from http://www.wmich.edu/wmu/news/2007/03/030.html Klopfer, E. Augmented learning: research of design and mobile educational games. The MIT Press. Retrieved May 13, 2008, from http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=11466 Mitchell, A. The use of computer and video games for learning. Retrieved May 15, 2008, from http://www.lsda.org.uk/files/PDF/1529.pdf   Shreve, J. Let the games begin:entertainment meets education. edutopia. Retrieved May 13, 2008, from http://www.edutopia.org/let-games-begin Graph #3 The graph below represents the number of people that either believed or disbelieved whether or not video games in the classroom will become more popular in the future. The majority of the responses believed that video games will more prevalent in the classrooms. Our research also indicated the outcome!