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MariBeth Plankers, M.S., CCC-SLP Regional Area Technology Center

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  1. Current, Best Strategies for Speech-Language Pathologists to Help Students with Augmentative Alternative Communication Needs MariBeth Plankers, M.S., CCC-SLP Regional Area Technology Center Minnesota State University Moorhead Moorhead, Minnesota

  2. Agenda AM PM 11:45 Lunch 1:00 Literacy and AAC 1:30 Accommodations/Modifications/VI, OT, PT 2:10 Alternate Access 2:30 Autism Spectrum/Visual Strategies 3:05 Wrap up/Questions • 8:30 Introduction • 8:45 AAC General Info • 8:55 Levels of Technology • 9:30 Assessment • 10:00 Break • 10:15 Goals and Objectives • 10:30 Vocabulary Selection • 11:15 Collaboration • 11:15 Planning Process

  3. Handbook Tour Addressing Questions and Introduction of Program Manager TABLE OF CONTENTS

  4. A Gift!

  5. Qualities of the Gift • Immediate • Accessible • Dynamic • In Control • Emotions • Reflective

  6. It defines who we are as a person. The gift is…

  7. The Ability to Communicate

  8. “I wonder…..” The rest of the story to be told…..

  9. Page 1 AAC General Information What does AAC mean to you as an SLP? AAC RESOURCES Sticker reminder! Page 2

  10. Communications Unaided Aided Low-Tech Mid-Tech High-Tech Electronic Communication Systems • Gestures • Body Language • Facial Expressions • Sign Language

  11. Page 5 Levels of Technology Page 5

  12. Initial Considerations The Model

  13. Model to AAC Guidelines • Student related AAC Options • Environmental Barriers • AAC Task Requirements • Goals • Multiple Modes • Team Decision Page 6

  14. AAC Options Student related • Accessibility • Cognition • Purpose • Function • Compatibility for setting/situation

  15. Eliminate the Inappropriate Options • Tech Level • Size • Vocabulary • Mounting • Dated • Student changes

  16. AAC Task Requirements • Communication Functions • Academic • Social/Emotional • Gaining Attention • On-going Communication • Multi-media

  17. Goal Driven • What is the overall goal? • Benchmarks to determine • Setting/Situation • People: Friends, family, school, community, vocational • Personal

  18. Multiple Mode Considerations • Gestures • Signing • Eye Gaze • Facial • Pictures/Graphics/Text • Speech Generating Devices

  19. Team Decision Process • Student • Parent/Guardian • Agency • School Staff: General/Special Ed. • Community • Vocational

  20. Levels of AAC Technology Page 6

  21. Page 6 No-Tech Considerations

  22. Gestures, Facial, Signing

  23. Scavenger Hunt

  24. Page 7 Low/Mid-Tech Considerations Page 7-8

  25. Page 8 High-Tech Considerations Page 8

  26. Page 11 Aided Language Stimulation Page 11

  27. Handbook Aided Communication Strategies: 101

  28. The AAC Expert Learner, we must show: • How to use their system • How to communicate • How to use other modes of communication in conjunction

  29. Key Aided Language Strategies • Allow for a model of communication to occur • Find strong areas of interest • Give feedback through various models: verbal, visual, tactile • Create numerous opportunities • Utilize stucture and routine throughout day • Consider wait time

  30. Create multiple means of engagement.

  31. Create multiple means for representation.

  32. Create multiple means for action and expression.

  33. Page 13 Assessment Process Page 13

  34. AAC Assessment • On-going process • Team supported • Leads to intervention planning

  35. Include in the AAC Assessment • Student information • Environmental barriers and strengths • Modes/methods of communication • Current and considered interactions • Tasks to achieve • Tools for consideration Page 14

  36. Interview the IEP team

  37. Informal AAC Assessment Tools AAC ASSESSMENT Page 15

  38. Participation ModelSETT (Student, EnvironmentTask and Tools)Every Move Counts Clicks and Chats

  39. Benefits of Participation Model There is a need for continuation of intervention planning and implementation due to change in on going communication. Page 15

  40. Assessment Segments • Note the current communication abilities and needs, in addition to the expectations in the environment. • Identify a communication systems that will support the student in new communication settings/situations. • Continue to support the system with changes as needed based on abilities and changes with the student.

  41. Participation Model Process • Participation Patterns • Communication Opportunities • Participation Comparison • Barriers: Opportunity and Access

  42. Participation Model Benchmarks • 1. Identify a target activity (Twirl painting) • 2. List the steps of the activity • 3. Observe typical peers’ ability and performance and then rate the potential AAC individual’s level of independence. • 4. Indicate if a difference is noted between the typical peer and the observed AAC individual’s performance. • 5. Document which barriers inhibit participation.

  43. Participation DocumentationLevels of Participation Note the range from independent to no participation.

  44. Types of Barriers Opportunity Access Message Selection Vocabulary Symbols Other notations • Policy • Practice • Attitude • Skill

  45. Intervention Planning • 1. Opportunities are given to the student (time) • 2. Demonstrate clarification of student’s ability • 3. Accessibility is ready and always available

  46. Intervention continued • 4. AAC systems are readily accessible for quick and easy communication • 5. Intervention may also include changes in the environment

  47. SETT • Student • Environment • Task • Tools Pgae 16

  48. Benefits of Using the SETT • It is sequential • Driven by student needs • Supported by the environment and tasks • Tools are considered last

  49. Example of Student questions • What does the student need to do, but is currently unable to do? • What are the student’s strengths, abilities, accomplishments, motivators and unique needs? • What strategies and accommodations have been successful?

  50. Examples of Environmental questions • What environments are typical for the student to complete IEP tasks along with materials available? • What is the physical and instructional arrangements? • What current supports and resources are available to the student and Team?