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Imperial Rome. Images of a culture. Roman Empire, 40 BC. Augustus Caesar, Princeps 27 BC–AD 14. Augustan Age 27 BC-AD 14 Political Reforms Economic Reforms Military Reforms Moral Reforms Propaganda Post-Augustan Dynasties to AD 180 Conditions at Home Conditions on the Frontier

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imperial rome

Imperial Rome

Images of a culture

imperial rome1
Augustan Age 27 BC-AD 14

Political Reforms

Economic Reforms

Military Reforms

Moral Reforms

Propaganda

Post-Augustan Dynasties to AD 180

Conditions at Home

Conditions on the Frontier

Life in Rome ca. AD 100

Urban Life

Agriculture

Culture

Imperial Rome
rule of augustus 27 bc ad 14
Rule of Augustus (27 BC-AD 14)
  • Principate (Augustan Settlement) retained military imperium
  • Pax Romana
  • Octavian becomes Augustus (man of honor)
  • Elected Consul (31 BC)
  • Tribune powers granted permanently (27 BC)
  • Marked the beginning of the Roman Empire
dynasties and key emperors
Julio-Claudian Dynasty

Augustus Caesar 27 BC–AD 14

Tiberius Caesar 14–37

Gaius (Caligula) 37–41

Claudius 41–54

Nero 54–69

Year of the Four Emperors AD 69

Galba

Otho

Vitellius

Vespasian—>

Flavian Dynasty

Vespasian 69–79

Titus 79–81

Domitian 81–96

The “Good Emperors”

Nerva 96–98

Trajan 98–117

Hadrian 117–138

Antoninus Pius 138–161

Marcus Aurelius 161–180

Dynasties and Key Emperors
life in rome ca ad 100
Life in Rome, ca. AD 100
  • Culture
    • Coinage
    • Architecture: new town and aquaducts
    • Communications
    • Education: private and expensive
    • Popular interests: gladitorial contests
  • City Life: Rome, Pompeii
  • Agriculture
  • Signs of trouble in 2nd Century
life in rome ad 100 200
Life in Rome, AD 100-200
  • Agriculture
  • Signs of Trouble in the 2nd century (101-200)
    • Population Stagnant/Declining
    • Intellectual
    • Political/Military
    • Spiritual
  • Christianity
  • Political Innovations after 200
the growth of christianity
The Growth of Christianity
  • Atmosphere in which it grew
    • Palestine
    • Philosophies and Cults
  • What aided its expansion?
    • Evangelists, “classlessness,” siege mentality, martyrdoms, sense of moral superiority, organization
  • What hindered its expansion?
    • Persecutions, divisions within its ranks
  • Eventual growth into state religion
political developments within the roman empire 3 rd 5 th centuries
Political Developments within the Roman Empire, 3rd-5th centuries
  • Militarization of the state under Septimus Severus
  • Series of rulers chosen by army (Barracks Emperors)
  • Division of the Empire (Diocletian)
    • Tetrarchy: 2 Augusti & 2 Caesars

Prefectures & dioceses

  • Reassertion of Unity (Constantine)
  • Growing Threat of Barbarian Migrations
  • Fall of Western Empire
split of the roman empire
Split of the Roman Empire
  • 2nd century: power shifted from Rome to the eastern provinces.
  • Diocletian (r. 284-305): tetrarchy: prefectures & dioceses
  • Constantine the Great (r. 306-337)
  • Constantinople became capital (330)
  • Byzantine Empire (Eastern Roman Empire)
    • More urbanized east, Greek influence
    • Lasted until 1453 when conquered by Ottoman Turks