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OVERVIEW OF SEWRPC PLANNING REPORT NO. 48 A REGIONAL LAND USE PLAN FOR SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN: 2035 PRESENTATION FOR THE OZAUKEE COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMITTEE SEPTEMBER 6, 2005. Doc #111649. YEAR 2035 REGIONAL LAND USE PLAN. 5 th Generation Regional Land Use Plan

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OVERVIEW OF SEWRPCPLANNING REPORT NO. 48A REGIONAL LAND USE PLAN FOR SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN: 2035PRESENTATION FORTHE OZAUKEE COUNTYCOMPREHENSIVE PLANNING CITIZEN ADVISORY COMMITTEESEPTEMBER 6, 2005

Doc #111649

year 2035 regional land use plan
YEAR 2035 REGIONAL LAND USE PLAN
  • 5th Generation Regional Land Use Plan
  • Prepared under the guidance of an advisory committee
  • Intended to serve as the basis for areawide plans
  • Intended to be refined and detailed in County and local planning
planning report no 48 a regional land use plan for southeastern wisconsin 2035
PLANNING REPORT NO. 48, AREGIONAL LAND USE PLAN FOR SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN: 2035

Chapter outline

  • Introduction
  • Existing Conditions and Trends
  • Review of the Currently Adopted 2020 Land Use Plan
  • Objective, Principles, and Standards
  • Population, Household, and Employment Projections
  • Recommended Land Use Plan
  • Plan Implementation
  • Summary
nature of the regional plan
NATURE OF THE REGIONAL PLAN

The regional land use plan is a “systems-level” plan. As such,the plan includes:

  • Generalized boundaries for urban service areas.
  • Allocations of population, households, and employment, and associated land use to urban and rural areas.
  • Density ranges for urban service areas.

The identification of precise urban service area boundaries and the actual design of neighborhoods and other development is beyond the scope of the plan and should be accomplished through detailed local planning within the framework of the regional plan.

basic definitions
BASIC DEFINITIONS
  • “Urban land” or “urban development”—an area devoted to urban-density residential, commercial, industrial, governmental and institutional, recreational, and utility and communication uses.
  • “Urban service areas”—areas that are intended to accommodate urban development insofar as they are served by basic urban services and facilities, including public sanitary sewer service and typically also including public water supply service and a local park, school, and shopping area.
  • “Urban-density residential development”—includes the following density ranges: High density (at least 7.0 dwelling units per net residential acre) Medium density (2.3 to 6.9 dwelling units per net acre) Low density (0.7 to 2.2 dwelling units per net acre)
  • “Sub-urban density residential development”—residential development at a density of 0.2 to 0.6 dwelling unit per residential acre. Such development is neither truly urban nor rural in character, generally precluding the provision of centralized sewer and water supply service and other urban amenities.
  • “Rural density residential development”—residential development at a density of no more than one dwelling unit per five acres. When accommodated through conservation subdivision designs, only a fraction of the total site area is intensively developed as homesites, the balance being retained in permanent open space use, achieving the overall rural density.
recommended year 2035 regional land use plan
RECOMMENDED YEAR 2035REGIONAL LAND USE PLAN

Key components:

Urban service areas

Environmentally significant land

Rural areas

plan recommendations for urban land
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR URBAN LAND
  • Urban development should occur in urban service areas—i.e., areas that are served by basic urban services and facilities, including public sanitary sewer and typically also including public water supply and other urban facilities and services.
  • Urban development should be accommodated through the infilling and renewal of existing urban service areas as well as through the orderly expansion of existing urban service areas—resulting in a relatively compact and efficient settlement pattern, one that is readily served by basic urban services and facilities and that maximizes the use of existing urban service and facility systems.
  • Urban development beyond planned urban service areas should be limited to areas already committed to such use through subdivision plats, along with highway-oriented business uses, utility uses, and recreational uses that may, of necessity, have to be located beyond planned urban service areas.
  • Under the plan, the total urban land area in the Region would increase by 92 square miles, or 13 percent, from 732 square miles in 2000 to 824 square miles in 2035.
  • In Ozaukee County the total urban land area under the plan would increase by 6 square miles, or 11 percent, from 53 square miles in 2000 to 59 square miles in 2035.
plan recommendations for urban land continued
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR URBAN LAND—continued

PROPOSED URBAN

CENTERS IN THE PRELIMINARY

RECOMMENDED REGIONAL LAND

USE PLAN: 2035

plan recommendations for urban land continued1
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR URBAN LAND—continued
  • Urban residential development (high, medium, and low density) should occur in predominantly residential neighborhoods as well as in more mixed-use settings:
    • Residential neighborhoods should be designed as cohesive units, properly related to the larger community of which they are a part, and served by an interconnected internal street, bicycle-way, and pedestrian system and by a neighborhood school, park, and shopping area.
    • Mixed-use settings include dwellings above the ground floor of commercial uses and residential structures intermixed with, or located adjacent to, compatible commercial, institutional, or civic uses.
  • Residential development should emphasize medium or higher densities—facilitating the efficient provision of public utilities and services and moderating the amount of open space required to be converted to urban use.
  • Under the plan, urban residential land in the Region would increase by 66 square miles, or 20 percent, from 333 square miles in 2000 to 399 square miles in 2035. About 88 percent of the projected increase in housing units would be accommodated at high and medium densities.
  • In Ozaukee County, urban residential land under the plan would increase by 4 square miles, or 16 percent, from 26 square miles in 2000 to 30 square miles in 2035.
plan recommendations for urban land continued2
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR URBAN LAND—continued
  • Under the plan, commercial and industrial land in the Region would increase by 18 square miles, or 28 percent, from 63 square miles in 2000 to 81 square miles in 2035.
  • In Ozaukee County, commercial and industrial land under the plan would increase by 1.4 square miles, or 44 percent, from 3.2 square miles in 2000 to 4.6 square miles in 2035.
  • Commercial and industrial development and redevelopment would be accommodated in a range of economic activity areas—including neighborhood, community, and regional commercial centers and community-level and regional industrial centers.
  • The largest of these areas, in terms of employment, are identified as major economic activity centers. A total of 60 major economic activity centers is envisioned, accommodating about 50 percent of all jobs in the Region. Three such centers are located in Ozaukee County—Mequon East, Mequon West, and Grafton.
plan recommendations for urban land continued3
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR URBAN LAND—continued

PROPOSED MAJOR ECONOMIC

ACTIVITY CENTERS IN THE

PRELIMINARY RECOMMENDED

REGIONAL LAND USE PLAN: YEAR 2035

plan recommendations for sub urban density residential land
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SUB-URBAN DENSITY RESIDENTIAL LAND
  • Sub-urban density residential: 0.2 to 0.6 dwelling units per acre—or single-family lots of 1.5 acres up to 5 acres.
  • Neither truly urban or rural in nature; difficult to serve with public utilities
  • Regional plan:
    • Seeks to limit such development to that which is already committed.
    • No additional sub-urban density residential development, beyond that which is already committed, is recommended.
plan recommendations for environmentally significant lands
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS FORENVIRONMENTALLY SIGNIFICANT LANDS
  • Primary environmental corridors—large, elongated areas in the landscape encompassing the best remaining woodlands, wetlands, prairies, wildlife habitat in the Region—should be preserved in essentially natural open use. Total area: 478 square miles, or 18 percent of the Region.
  • Other smaller concentrations of natural resources—“secondary environmental corridors” and “isolated natural resource areas”—warrant strong consideration for preservation. These areas should be retained in natural, open use as determined in county and local plans. Total area: 140 square miles, or 5 percent of the Region.
plan recommendations for environmentally significant lands continued
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS FORENVIRONMENTALLY SIGNIFICANTLANDS—continued
  • The plan recognizes that certain limited development may be accommodated in the environmental corridors and isolated natural resource areas without jeopardizing their overall integrity.
    • Certain transportation and utility uses may of necessity have to be located within such areas.
    • Limited residential and recreational uses may be accommodated in such areas. Residential development in environmental corridors should be limited to upland areas at an overall density of no more than one dwelling unit per five acres, with conservation subdivision designs strongly encouraged where residential development is accommodated.
  • The plan supports carefully planned efforts such as the North Branch Milwaukee River Wildlife and Farming Heritage Area project which may result in the re-establishment of wetlands, woodlands, prairies, grasslands, and forest interiors, potentially expanding the environmental corridor network in the Region.
plan recommendations for environmentally significant lands continued1
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS FORENVIRONMENTALLY SIGNIFICANT LANDS—continued

PLANNED ENVIRONMENTAL CORRIDORS

AND ISOLATED NATURAL RESOURCE

AREAS IN THE REGION

plan recommendations for rural areas
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR RURAL AREAS
  • Lands beyond the planned urban service areas (white areas on the plan map) should be retained in essentially rural use—primarily agriculture use and rural density residential use.
  • Prime Agricultural Lands:
    • Prime agricultural land in this area—the land best suited for agricultural use—should be preserved for farming, with residential development generally limited to no more than one dwelling unit per 35 acres.
    • Counties in the Region, in cooperation with the concerned local units of government, should carry out planning programs to identify prime agricultural land.
    • The regional plan holds out the preservation of the most productive soils—soils in U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service Agricultural Capability Class I and Class II—as a key consideration in efforts to identify prime farmland, recognizing, however, that other factors, such as farm size and the overall of farming area, should also be considered.
plan recommendations for rural areas continued
PLAN RECOMMENDATIONSFOR RURAL AREAS—continued
  • Non-Prime Farmland:
    • The plan also encourages the preservation of non-prime farmland for agricultural use. This could be in the form of traditional agricultural use or alternative agricultural uses such as smaller hobby farms or specialty farms including community supported agricultural operations.
    • Development of non-prime farmland beyond planned urban service areas should be limited to rural residential development at a density of no more than one dwelling unit per five acres. Where rural residential development is accommodated, the regional plan encourages the use of conservation subdivision designs.
population households and employment
POPULATION, HOUSEHOLDS,AND EMPLOYMENT
  • Plan accommodates “intermediate” projections of population, households, and employment for Region:
    • Population: Increase of 345,000, or 18 percent to 2,276,000 persons in 2035
    • Households: Increase of 177,000, or 24 percent, to 926,000 households in 2035
    • Employment: Increase of 146,000 or 12 percent, to 1,368,000 jobs in 2035
population households and employment continued
POPULATION, HOUSEHOLDS,AND EMPLOYMENT—continued
  • Ozaukee County:
    • Population: Increase of 19,000, or 23 percent, to 101,000 persons in 2035.
    • Households: Increase of 9,000, or 29 percent, to 40,000 households in 2035.
    • Employment: Increase of 11,500, or 23 percent, to 62,000 jobs in 2035
conclusion the plan s vision for the region
CONCLUSION: THE PLAN’S VISION FOR THE REGION
  • The increase in urban land to accommodate growth in the regional population and economy would be moderated, compared to historic trends. Urban development would occur in urban service areas—areas served by basic urban service and facilities, including public sanitary sewer and typically also including public water supply and other urban facilities. New urban development would be accommodated through the infilling and renewal of existing urban service areas as well as through the orderly expansion of existing urban service areas, resulting in a relatively compact and efficient overall settlement pattern, one that is readily served by basic urban services and facilities and maximizes the use of existing urban service and facility systems.
conclusion the plan s vision for the region continued
CONCLUSION: THE PLAN’S VISIONFOR THE REGION—continued
  • Urban residential development would occur in predominantly residential neighborhoods as well as in more mixed-use settings. Residential neighborhoods would be designed as cohesive units, properly related to the larger community of which they are a part, and served by an interconnected internal street, bicycle-way, and pedestrian system and by a neighborhood school, park, and shopping area. In addition to neighborhood development, other residential development would occur in settings having an even grater mixture of land uses. Examples of such mixed-use settings include dwellings above the ground floor of commercial uses and residential structures intermixed with, or located adjacent to, compatible commercial, institutional, or civic uses. The bulk of residential development would occur at medium or higher densities, facilitating the efficient provision of public utilities and services and moderating the amount of open space required to be converted to urban use.
conclusion the plan s vision for the region continued1
CONCLUSION: THE PLAN’S VISIONFOR THE REGION—continued
  • Lands beyond planned urban service areas would be retained in essentially rural use, with highly productive farmlands preserved and with development limited to overall densities, and accommodated through designs, that are consistent with the maintenance of rural character and consistent as well with the capacities of existing street and other public facility and service systems in those areas.
  • The land development needs of the Region would be met while preserving the best remaining elements of the natural resource base—most of which are located within environmental corridors and isolated natural resource areas—and preserving productive farmland, resulting in an interconnected, integrated system of open space lands within the Region.