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City Council Regular Session. August 6, 2013. 2011 STRATEGIC INITIATIVES Huntsville residents enjoy a safe, healthy, affordable and historic community. Huntsville is an economically diverse and developing community.

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slide2

2011 STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

  • Huntsville residents enjoy a safe, healthy, affordable and historic community.
  • Huntsville is an economically diverse and developing community.
  • Huntsville residents enjoy and benefit from an attractive city with beautiful parks and lifelong educational and cultural opportunities.
  • Huntsville is a well-managed, sustainable community that values its natural resources and provides exceptional public services.
  • Huntsville is a friendly place where a warm welcome awaits both visitors and new residents.
city of huntsville

City of Huntsville

Workshop - August 6

Health Insurance Presentation

medical insurance challenges
Medical Insurance Challenges
  • Adopted Fiscal Year 12-13 Budget projected:
    • Expenditures - $4,375,000
    • Revenues - $3,570,671
    • Use of Fund Balance - $804,329
  • Reduced fund balance by 36%.
  • Remaining fund balance is estimated at $1,427,464.
  • Fund balance required by policy $759,000
  • Industry standard for reserves 37.5%
fiscal year 13 14 estimates
Fiscal Year 13-14 Estimates

Based on medical claims through March 2013, trend (the overall expected cost increase based on inflation, utilization, market influence, and other factors) and healthcare reform mandates, the projected deficit for the ’13-’14 FY was approximately $593,000.

  • Options considered to cover/lower deficit:
    • Increase contributions from $9,000 per employee per year to $11,100 per employee per year for medical and dental
    • Implement plan design changes – increased copays, deductible, etc.
what we have done
What we have done
  • Educated employees/retirees (160) during 8 informational meetings to explain insurance.
  • Welcomed employee feedback through 13 feedback meetings with 188 active and retiree participants.
  • Compared a fully-insured quote from current provider to our self-funded plan.
what needs to happen
What needs to happen
  • Understand the differences between self-insured and fully-insured.
  • Decide whether to continue with self-insured or move to fully-insured plan.
  • Determine the best approach to eliminate the deficit.
self funded versus fully insured
Self Funded versus Fully Insured
  • Cost components
    • Claims (variable)
    • Stop loss premium (fixed)
    • Admin cost (fixed)
  • City takes control of assets of plan, invest them, and eliminates insurance company profits.
  • Flexibility of plan design changes
  • Premium components
    • Greater than expected claims (fixed)
    • Profit (fixed)
    • Admin cost (fixed)
    • Overhead cost (fixed)
    • Commissions (fixed)
    • Various risk charges

Self Funded

Fully Insured

self funded versus fully insured for example
Self-Funded versus Fully-InsuredFor example:

Fully Insured

Insurance Company acct

Premium is $1,000

And claims/other cost $500

Remains in acct $500

(Insurance company profit)

Self Funded

In your own checkbook

If you deposit $1,000

And bills equal $500

Remains in acct $500

(Your money)

analogy
Analogy
  • Fully Insured
  • Self-Funded
buy or rent
Buy or Rent??
  • Own Home – Self Funded
    • Financial, tax and control advantages
    • Assume responsibilities (e.g., care of yard)
    • Take some risk (e.g.; fire and depreciation), nearly all of which may be protected by insurance.
  • Rent Home – Fully Insured
    • Belief that responsibility & risk beyond capabilities
    • Insurance is not their expertise
    • Pay more for total freedom from plan/risk worries

Rent?

Buy?

fully insured quote from tml iebp
Fully-Insured quote from TML-IEBP
  • Claims projection updated by our consultants results in a $379,971 deficit due to reduction in claims.
  • The proposed fully insured quote that most closely matches our current plan design results in a deficit of $293,549 over current plan cost.
  • The second plan, with reduced benefits, results in a surplus of $158,235.
advantages for fully insured quote from tml
Advantages for Fully-Insured quote from TML
  • Assumes less risk for claims volatility
  • Easier to budget the cost because of being a flat dollar amount per month
  • No fear of a greater deficit for that year due to claims fluctuations
disadvantages for fully insured quote from tml
Disadvantages for Fully-Insured Quote from TML
  • It’s insurance! Loss of control and flexibility.
  • There is no guarantee that TML will offer a fully-insured quote for January 2014.
  • City could be faced with a huge renewal increase and no flexibility to manage plan design to address future cost increases.
  • Questions about fully-insured in general and/or TML IEBP proposal?
process
Process
  • We educated employees and provided them with an opportunity to deal with this unfortunate situation in a very democratic way.
  • Deficit for 2013-14 is estimated at $600,000 as of February 2013.
  • $600,000 deficit – too much to ask employees to deal with. Reduced by $200,000 through elimination of out-of-network max, eliminate 4th Quarter Deductible Carry-over, LTD paid by employees, and provide one Life benefit.
    • These benefits are gone when the Council says they’re gone. Setting them aside just allowed more focus.
clickers
Clickers!
  • Employees were given four areas of plan design and six choices within each of the four plan design areas to decide how best to save $400,000.
  • Selections were tabulated on the basis of premium type – Employee Only (174), Employee + Spouse (26), Employee + Child(ren)(34), or Family (54).
  • Please note, Employee Only participants make up 60% of the members on the plan. They also represented 53% of the clicker turnout.
results premiums options
Results: Premiums Options
  • 31% selected a 10% increase for a $50,000 saving
  • Three way tie for 2nd place
    • 16% selected a 0% increase for $0 saving
    • 16% selected a 20% increase for $100,000 saving
    • 16% selected a 50% increase for $250,000 saving

*The remaining 21% of employees’ responses did not result in significant indicators

results deductibles
Results: Deductibles
  • 30% selected a $100 increase for a $50,000 saving
  • 24% selected a $200 increase for a $100,000 saving
  • 19% selected a $500 increase for a $250,000 saving

*The remaining 27% of employees’ responses did not result in significant indicators

results front end prescription deductible
Results: Front-end prescription deductible
  • 38% selected a $100 RX deductible for a $50,000 saving
  • 32% selected a $0 RX deductible for a $0 saving
  • 18% selected a $200 RX deductible for a $100,000 saving

*The remaining 12% of employees’ responses did not result in significant indicators

results primary care physician specialist co pay
Results: Primary Care Physician/Specialist Co-Pay
  • 46% selected a $10 increase PCP & $25 increase for Specialist for a $50,000 saving
  • 21% selected a $20 increase PCP & $45 increase for Specialist for a $100,000 saving

*The remaining 33% of employees’ responses did not result in significant indicators

since april
Since April…
  • The first 9 months of this year, claims are $1,695,797.
  • That is 18.3% lower than 2012. ($2,075,121)
recommendations
Recommendations

#1 – Stay with a self-insured approach.

#2 – Eliminate the additional life insurance policy, AD&D policy, the 4th quarter deductible carryover and the out-of-network maximum/cap. This would save the City $200,000.

recommendations cont
Recommendations cont.

#3 - Increase premiums by 10%, increase deductibles to $600/$1,800, add $100 prescription deductible for Rx and increase co-pays to $35/$50 for primary care and specialist physician accordingly. This would save the City $200,000.

  • The recommendation is to extend the current benefit year to December 31 for a January renewal.
  • The recommended reserve amounts for our plan should be $1,375,846. Since fiscal year 2012-2013 brought an $800,000 use of fund balance, the estimated ending fund balance for the year is $1,427,464.
recommendations cont1
Recommendations cont.
  • #4 – Automatic triggers
  • Since staff is recommending a three month extension on the current plan, on a budgeted basis, this exposes the City to another $200,000 in use of fund balance. If, at any time after January 1, 2014, the estimated available fund balance falls below $1,375,846, staff recommends automatically triggering the following changes:
recommendations cont2
Recommendations cont.
  • #4 Automatic triggers continued
    • Increase premiums an additional 20% (over the 10% increase contained in Recommendation #3) for a 30% increase over current-year premiums. This would add $100,000 in additional revenue to the plan.
    • Increase co-pays to $45/$70 for primary care and specialist physicians accordingly. This would add an additional $50,000 in saving to the plan.
points of note
Points of Note:
  • The City may choose to rebate an amount to employees with a self-insured approach. There isn’t as much risk with the perception of “too drastic” changes with self-insured plans (when compared with fully-insured plans).
  • As a show of good-faith, staff would certainly accept direction to come up with triggers for rebates as well (probably not automatic).
city council meeting august 6 2013
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

MAIN SESSION [6:00pm]

1. CALL TO ORDER

2. INVOCATION AND PLEDGES

U.S. Flag

Texas Flag: Honor the Texas flag. I pledge allegiance to

thee, Texas, one state under God, one and indivisible.

3. PUBLIC COMMENT

a. Related to any City business not on the agenda – 2 minutes per speaker

b. Related to any matter on the agenda – 5 minutes per speaker

city council meeting august 6 20131
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

4. CONSENT AGENDA

Approval of Consent Agenda authorizes the City Manager to implement each item in accordance with staff recommendations. An item may be removed from the Consent Agenda and added to the Statutory Agenda for full discussion by request of a member of Council.)

a. Approve the minutes of the City Council Workshop and Regular Session held on July 16, 2013 and the Special Session held on July 23, 2013. [Lee Woodward, City Secretary]

  • Adopt Ordinance 2013-33 amending the City of Huntsville, Texas Code of Ordinances, specifically Chapter 26 “Law Enforcement”, reaffirming the existence of the Police Department; and making other provisions and findings thereto; and declaring an effective date, 2nd reading. [Chief Kevin Lunsford, Director of Public Safety]

c. Approve Ordinance 2013-36 to amend the budget for FY 12-13. [Steve Ritter, Interim Finance Director]

city council meeting august 6 20132
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

5. STATUTORY AGENDA

a. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to approve Ordinance 2013-34 calling the November 5, 2013 municipal general election for the purpose of electing a Mayor and four (4) Ward Councilmembers, and calling a special election to fill a vacancy to elect a Councilmember At-Large Position 1, single reading required. [Lee Woodward, City Secretary]

city council meeting august 6 20133
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

5. STATUTORY AGENDA

b. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to approve Resolution 2013-14 authorizing the placement of speed cushions in the 2200 – 2400 Blocks of Avenue S. [Aron Kulhavy, Director of Community and Economic Development]

city council meeting august 6 20134
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

5. STATUTORY AGENDA

c. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to authorize the Director of Public Works to approve the renewal of Industrial User (IU) Discharge Permit 0100 for Gardner Glass Products, Incorporated, first reading. [Carol Reed, Director of Public Works]

city council meeting august 6 20135
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

5. STATUTORY AGENDA

d. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to approve Ordinance 2013-35 creating a limited parking zone on University Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets, first reading. [Aron Kulhavy, Director of Community and Economic Development]

city council meeting august 6 20136
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

5. STATUTORY AGENDA

e. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to consider a Utility Extension Request from RohamDarvishi for a sanitary sewer line extension located at 3233 Woodward Drive, including City portion of $4,411.76. [Aron Kulhavy, Director of Community and Economic Development]

city council meeting august 6 20137
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

6. MAYOR/CITY COUNCIL AND CITY MANAGER REPORT

  • Presentation, discussion, and possible action to approve Resolution 2013-13 in support of a proposal by Entergy Texas, Inc. and ITC Holdings Corporation regarding the change of ownership and control of transmission business, transfer of certification rights, and related relief in Public Utility Commission Docket No. 41223, upon the guarantee of enumerated conditions. [Leonard Schneider, City Attorney]
city council meeting august 6 20138
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

6. MAYOR/CITY COUNCIL AND CITY MANAGER REPORT

b. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to consider proposals for Charter amendments for the November ballot. [Mayor Woodward]

city council meeting august 6 20139
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

6. MAYOR/CITY COUNCIL AND CITY MANAGER REPORT

c. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to approve nominations for City boards, committees, and commissions. [Mayor Woodward]

city council meeting august 6 201310
City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

6. MAYOR/CITY COUNCIL AND CITY MANAGER REPORT

d. Presentation, discussion, and possible action to update the Council on the Buxton contract. [Councilmember Allen]

e. City Manager’s Report

1. The City Manager, City Attorney and/or other members of the City staff will provide an update on the sale of property located at 2257 Sam Houston Avenue, commonly known as the “Army Reserve Building,” as per the requirements in Resolution #2013-11.

2. Updates on City construction, grants, studies, City projects, City purchases, and economic development.

cities contacted db residential alphabetical

Cities Contacted - dB (residential)(alphabetical)

Austin 85

Baytown 75 (7a- 9p) / 65 (9p-7a)

College Station 63 (7a-10p) / 56 (10p-7a)

Elgin 67 (7a-10p) / 60 (10p-7a)

Galveston 80 (7a-10p) / 85 (10p-7a)

Houston 65 (day) / 58 (night)

Huntsville (development code) 55

League City 75 (construction equip)

North Richland Hills 75 (7a-10p) / 60 (10p-7a)

Pasadena 75

Pflugerville 85

Richland Hills 85

Spring Valley 55 (7a-9p) / 50 (9p-7a)

cities contacted db residential by level low to high

Cities Contacted - dB (residential) (by level – low to high)

Huntsville (development code) 55

Spring Valley 55 (7a-9p) / 50 (9p-7a)

College Station 63 (7a-10p)/ 56 (10p-7a)

Houston 65 (day) / 58 (night)

Elgin 67 (7a-10p)/ 60 (10p-7a)

North Richland Hills 75 (7a-10p)/ 60 (10p-7a)

Baytown75(7a- 9p)/ 65 (9p-7a)

Pasadena 75

League City 75 (construction equip)

Galveston 80 (7a-10p) / 85 (10p-7a)

Austin 85

Pflugerville 85

Richland Hills 85

slide44

Sound travels in weird ways

65 dB of ocean waves are much different than 65 dB of unwanted amplified music when trying to sleep

slide45

Several ordinances specifically addressed:

  • Outdoor amplification during specified times
  • Loud vibrations (car stereos, home stereos, etc.)
  • Strong language against noise even w/o dB measurements
  • dB measured from either offending property line or receiving property line
slide46

Several positive meetings / phone calls / emails with both the complainants and Mr. Maalouf of Draft Bar.

These parties have displayed a willingness to work together.

Absent input / comments from council, we intend to proceed with staff recommendations (next slide)

slide47

Staff Recommendations generally:

  • Establish dB level in noise ordinance (move from development code)
  • dB level approximately in the 65 dB range
  • dB measured from offending property
  • strong language against unreasonable noises (regardless of dB)
  • no outdoor amplification past ~10 -10:30 p.m. w/o permit
  • outdoor amp. permit only available two or three times per year
  • address loud noise / vibrations from car stereos
slide48

City Council MeetingAugust 6, 2013Section 1104.5 Height limitation and measurementChapter 11, Sign Standards, Huntsville Development Code

brief history of sign regulations
Brief History of Sign Regulations
  • June 16, 1981 – Sign Ordinance adopted
  • June 10, 1986 – Integrated into the Development Code
  • No official changes to Section 1104.5 to date regarding the 500 foot distance from IH 45 or the 42-1/2 feet height limit within the 500 foot distance.
rules for signage along ih 45
Rules for signage along IH 45

Section 1104.5(1)(a)1)

A ground sign within 500 feet of Interstate 45 may be constructed to a height not to exceed 42-1/2 feet

related zba variance requests
Related ZBA Variance Requests
  • Granted:
    • 1994 – Taco Bell sign (multi-tenant sign)
    • 1998/1999 – Chili’s sign (multi-tenant sign)
    • Denied:

These requests were to increase sign height outside the 500 foot distance

    • 1994 – West Hill Mall (2 Financial Plaza)
    • 2008 – Current Holiday Inn Express (148 IH 45 S)
    • 2009 – Gateway Inn (201 West Hill Park Circle)
    • 2013 – Best Western (201 West Hill Park Circle)
requests to change section 1104 5
Requests to Change Section 1104.5
  • June 15, 2010 – City Council
    • The request was to increase the distance from IH 45 from 500 feet to 600 feet.
    • This request was in response to a denied variance request to the Zoning Board of Adjustment (ZBA) dated December 18, 2009.
    • June 2, 2010 – P&Z recommended to City Council that the Code remain the same
    • City Council considered this item on June 15th. This item was tabled.
future action
Future Action
  • P&Z meeting August 15 to consider changing Section 1104.5(1)(a)1) as directed
    • Requires Public Hearing
    • P&Z makes a recommendation to City Council
  • City Council meeting, September 6
    • Requires Public Hearing and two readings.
  • Development Code update is currently underway
establishing a historic preservation ordinance

Establishing a Historic Preservation Ordinance

Submitted by: The City of Huntsville Community & Economic Development Department

purpose
Purpose

To protect and enhance the landmarks and districts which represent distinctive elements of Huntsville’s historic, architectural, and cultural heritage;

Foster civic pride in the accomplishments of the past;

Protect and enhance Huntsville’s attractiveness to visitors and the support and stimulus to the economy thereby provided;

purpose1
Purpose

Ensure the manageable, orderly, and efficient growth and development of the city;

Promote economic prosperity and welfare of the community by encouraging the most appropriate use of such property within the city;

Encourage stabilization, restoration, and improvements of such properties and their values.

a historic preservation ordinance
A Historic Preservation Ordinance

Protects the authenticity of local character…which is one of the best selling points of a city in terms of tourism, development, sustainability, and quality of life. The local Wal-Mart, strip malls, or commercial development out on does not make a place unique.

a preservation ordinance does
A Preservation Ordinance DOES

Provide policy and process for the protection of historic properties.

Allow public participation – establishing a district, project proposals, etc.

Allows method of appeal and variances if all reasonable or beneficial use of the property can be demonstrated

Establish process for designating historic properties

Protect the integrity of designated historic properties within a design review requirement

Ensure new development within historic districts to are not destructive to the area's historic character

Protect and enhance property values

a preservation ordinance does not
A Preservation Ordinance DOES NOT

Require that historic properties be open for tours

Restrict the sale of the property or lowers property value

Require improvements, alterations, or restoration of the property beyond regular or routine maintenance

Require approval of interior changes or alterations

Prevent new construction or development within historic areas

Require approval for ordinary maintenance and/or in-kind repair

establishing a preservation commission
Establishing a Preservation Commission

A Historic Preservation Commission shall consist of five (5) members to be appointed by the mayor and shall have a known and demonstrated interest, competence, or knowledge in historic preservation within the City of Huntsville.

Commission recommendations shall be guided by the criteria established in Design Guidelines and National Historic Preservation Criteria

historic preservation officer
Historic Preservation Officer

The City Manager can appoint a qualified city official or staff person, of the municipal entity to serve as historic preservation officer. This officer shall administer this ordinance and advise the Commission on matters submitted to it. The officer is responsible for coordinating the city’s preservation activities with those of state and federal agencies and other preservation organizations.

benefits of a preservation ordinance
Benefits of a Preservation Ordinance

Historic preservation provides an economic revitalization tool in older neighborhoods that have deteriorated due to the growth of suburbs, neglect, or alterations to architectural heritage. Historic preservation makes use of existing housing and commercial building stock and helps sustain the identity of the community.

Preservation in Texas has increased property values, encouraged tourism, and created new jobs and new businesses.

slide65

Adopting a local preservation ordinance is one of the best ways a community can protect the historic character of its buildings, neighborhoods and landmarks from inappropriate alterations, incompatible new construction, even outright demolition.

slide66

City Council Meeting – August 6, 2013

7. PUBLIC COMMENT

a. Related to any City business – 2 minutes per speaker

8. MEDIA INQUIRIES RELATED TO MATTERS ON THE AGENDA

9. ITEMS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST

(Hear announcements concerning items of community interest from the Mayor, Councilmembers, and City staff for which no action will be discussed or taken.)

10.ADJOURNMENT

slide67

2011 STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

  • Huntsville residents enjoy a safe, healthy, affordable and historic community.
  • Huntsville is an economically diverse and developing community.
  • Huntsville residents enjoy and benefit from an attractive city with beautiful parks and lifelong educational and cultural opportunities.
  • Huntsville is a well-managed, sustainable community that values its natural resources and provides exceptional public services.
  • Huntsville is a friendly place where a warm welcome awaits both visitors and new residents.
slide68

The City Council is

currently in

Executive Session and

will reconvene before

adjourning.