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Module 1: Preparing for the Future. SWITCH Training Kit Module 1: Preparing for the Future Strategic planning and action for integration in urban water management An overview. The importance of good urban water management. Water and urban quality of life: Public health Security Economy

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slide1

Module 1: Preparing for the Future

SWITCH Training Kit

Module 1: Preparing for the Future

Strategic planning and action for integration in urban water management

An overview

slide2

The importance of good urban water management

Water and urban quality of life:

  • Public health
  • Security
  • Economy
  • Environment
slide3

Urban water management – The issues

Increasing complexity and risks of infrastructure systems

Climate change

Energy use

Population growth and urbanisation

Emerging technologies

Deterioration of infrastructure systems

Changes in public priorities

Governance and policies

slide4

Conventional approaches to urban water management

  • Stormwater collection and disposal using concrete channels and pipes
  • Centralised wastewater collection and treatment
  • Increased water demand is met through new supplies
  • Standard engineering solutions are applied
  • Different sectors of the water cycle are managed separately
slide5

Drawbacks of the conventional approach to urban water management

  • Lack of integration
  • Short-term solutions
  • Lack of flexibility
  • Energy intensive
slide6

Links within the water cycle

Stormwater

  • Water quality
  • Potential resource
  • Sewer capacities
  • Water treatment standards

The Urban Water Cycle

Water supply

Wastewater

  • Potential resource
  • Wastewater volume
slide7

Links between water and other sectors of urban planning

Roads and transport

Housing

Energy

Waste management

Parks, gardens and recreation

Farming

Local economic development

Health

Land-use management

slide8

Integrated Urban Water Management (IUWM)

IUWM requires the consideration of:

  • All parts of the water cycle as an integrated system
  • The need to strive for sustainability
  • All water users and other relevant stakeholders
  • All water uses

(Based on Mitchell, 2004)

slide9

Integrated approaches to urban water management

  • Stormwater is attenuated and retained using natural systems
  • Wastewater is separated at source and reused
  • Reducing water demand is given priority over increasing supply
  • Innovative solutions are encouraged
  • Physical and institutional integration in the management of the water cycle

(Based on Mitchell, 2004)

slide10

Benefits of IUWM

  • Increased water availability
  • Reduced cost of water treatment
  • Increased biodiversity
  • Identification of more cost effective and viable solutions
why iuwm is more sustainable
Why IUWM is more sustainable

Meets society’s needs for water in a fair way … and protects it from risks caused by water

Ensures the necessary financing for managing the water resources and for meeting society’s needs

Preserves / restores aquatic ecosystems

slide12

Moving towards integration

  • Communication, coordination & collaboration across institutional boundaries
  • Cross-disciplinary interaction
  • Multi-stakeholder involvement
  • Experimenting – learning – sharing
  • Regular review and adjustment
  • Importance of joint vision
slide13

Adopting IUWM through strategic planning

Assessment of situation & scenario building

Visioning & setting of objectives

Strategy development & political commitment

Action planning & implementation

Monitoring & evaluation

slide14

Acknowledgements

This presentation has been produced as part of the SWITCH Training Kit by:

Ralph Philip and Barbara Anton

ICLEI – Local Government’s for Sustainability

based on the joint efforts of the following SWITCH partners:

P. van der Steen (UNESCO-IHE), J. Butterworth (IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre), C. Batchelor (IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre), C. Da Silva (IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre), D.M. Guio-Torres (UNESCO-IHE), C. Howe (UNESCO-IHE), Z. Vojinovic (UNESCO-IHE)

The UNESCO-IHE led SWITCH project runs from Feb. 2006 to Jan. 2011 and is part-financed by Directorate General Research of the European Commission under the Sixth Framework Programme. For more information see www.switchurbanwater.eu