um i forget n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Forgetting PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Forgetting

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Forgetting - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 265 Views
  • Uploaded on

Um I forget…. Forgetting. How do we forget?. Herman Ebbinghaus , 1885 subjects memorise a list of meaningless, three letter words called nonsense syllables tracked how quickly his subjects forgot the words became known as the Ebbinghaus or Forgetting Curve. The forgetting curve.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Forgetting' - pillan


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
how do we forget
How do we forget?
  • Herman Ebbinghaus, 1885
  • subjects memorise a list of meaningless, three letter words called nonsense syllables
  • tracked how quickly his subjects forgot the words
  • became known as the Ebbinghaus or Forgetting Curve
the forgetting curve
The forgetting curve

Measures the amount of information retained and the rate at which information is forgotten.

measures of retention measuring memory recall
Measures of Retention – Measuring MemoryRecall
  • Being asked to reproduce information with the fewest possible cues.
  • Free Recall – asked to remember as much information as possible in no particular order
  • Serial Recall – asked to recall information in a particular order
  • Cued Recall- given a cue then asked to recall
measures of retention measuring memory recognition
Measures of Retention – Measuring MemoryRecognition
  • Identifying correct information from among alternatives.
  • Learning information again that has been previously learned and stored in long-term memory.
  • Savings score calculated: The amount of information saved from previous learning

Measures of Retention – Measuring Memory Relearning

measures of retention sensitivity
Measures of retention - sensitivity
  • Recall worst
  • Recognition better
  • Relearning best
theories of forgetting
Theories of forgetting

Psychologists have developed a number of theories to explain why we forget.

Theories of

forgetting

Retrieval failure

Interference

theory

Motivated

forgetting

Decay theory

Memory fades

(decays)

over time

due to disuse.

We lack, or fail to

use, the right cues

to retrieve

information stored

in memory.

Other competing

memories interfere

with retrieval of

what we are trying

to recall.

There is a

strong desire

(motive) to

forget.

forgetting
Forgetting
  • The inability to retrieve previously stored information. If you forget that doesn’t mean that the information is gone forever, it simply means that for whatever reason you have failed to retrieve that information.
  • Retrieval Failure Theory: Forget because fail to use the right retrieval cue
  • Tip of the tongue phenomenon: Know that you know the answer but can’t retrieve if from memory at that point in time.
  • Possibly due to partial retrieval. Lack of correct cue.
motivated forgetting
Motivated forgetting
  • Forget because we want to forget, defense mechanism that protects us from distressing memories.
  • Information not lost but hard to retrieve during normal waking consciousness
  • Motivation can also lead us to recode distressing memories as more pleasant
  • Repression - unconscious defense mechanism
  • Suppression – consciously choosing not to think
interference theory
Interference theory
  • Forget because other memories interfere with the one we are trying to retrieve, particularly those that are similar to the one we are trying to recall
  • Retroactive interference– New information interferes with the remembering ofold information
  • Proactive interference- Old information interferes with ability to remember new information
retroactive interference
Retroactive Interference

New Learning Interferes with Old

Learning

Italian

Learning

Spanish

Test on

Italian

TIME

proactive interference
Proactive Interference

Old Material Interferes with New

Learning

Spanish

Learning

Italian

Test on

Italian

TIME

exam question 2005
EXAM QUESTION 2005
  • Question 13
  • Kathleen has had an answering machine in her office for the last two years. Recently Kathleen also bought a machine for her home. The two machines use different keys to save, delete or play messages. After a busy week at work, Kathleen has a lot of trouble remembering the correct keys for her machine at home. This problem is due to
  • A. proactive interference.
  • B. retroactive interference.
  • C. anterograde amnesia.
  • D. retrograde amnesia.
  • Question 14
  • Kathleen finally works out how to correctly use her machine at home; however, when she returns to work the next day, she confuses the numbers for the functions on the machine at work with the numbers of her home
  • machine. This problem is due to
  • A. proactive interference.
  • B. retroactive interference.
  • C. anterograde amnesia.
  • D. retrograde amnesia.
exam question 20051
EXAM QUESTION 2005
  • Question 13
  • Kathleen has had an answering machine in her office for the last two years. Recently Kathleen also bought a machine for her home. The two machines use different keys to save, delete or play messages. After a busy week at work, Kathleen has a lot of trouble remembering the correct keys for her machine at home. This problem is due to
  • A. proactive interference.
  • B. retroactive interference.
  • C. anterograde amnesia.
  • D. retrograde amnesia.
  • Question 14
  • Kathleen finally works out how to correctly use her machine at home; however, when she returns to work the next day, she confuses the numbers for the functions on the machine at work with the numbers of her home
  • machine. This problem is due to
  • A. proactive interference.
  • B. retroactive interference.
  • C. anterograde amnesia.
  • D. retrograde amnesia.
decay theory
Decay theory
  • Forget because the physical trace of memory fades over time due to disuse
  • This physical or chemical trace is known as an engram

Based on assumption that memory is stored as a physical or chemical trace in the brain.