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Art and Literature. Millie Chang Camille Vistica Katie Egolf AP Euro 4* Semester 1. Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the Renaissance More Review? Check out Page 354-355. Literature

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art and literature

Art and Literature

Millie Chang

Camille Vistica

Katie Egolf

AP Euro 4*

Semester 1

recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance more review check out page 354 355
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the RenaissanceMore Review? Check out Page 354-355

Literature

  • Humanism: intellectual movement of the study of classical literary works. (ex: poetry, poetry, philosophy, etc...)
  • Liberal studies: influenced by the liberal arts; key to freeing a man by allowing him to reach his full potential (ex: letters, poetry, eloquence, moral philosophy, history, etc…)
  • Gucciardini in his History of Italystated that purpose of writing history is to teach lessons and analyze political situations by secularizing history.
  • Leonardo Bruni wrote History of the Florentine People which emphasized secularization in history by stripping away divine intervention.
  • Printing Press: Gutenberg's invention of printing with moveable type which promoted reading (literature) and the thirst for knowledge.
recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance more review check out page 355 357
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the RenaissanceMore Review? Check out Page 355-357

Early Renaissance Art

  • Emphasis on the mathematical side of painting proportion, organization using geometry,
  • Realistic portrayals of the human body (including nudes)
  • Realistic relationship between figures/background (three dimensional visual representation)
  • Architecture was inspired by Roman antiquity. Domes, arches, columns replaced the traditional Gothic style.
recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the Renaissance

SandroBotecelli’sPrimavera

Donato Donatello’s David

slide5

Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the Renaissance

Massacio’sTribute Money (above) and Holy Trinity with the Virgin (below)

Brunelleschi’s Duomo (right) and the interior of the Church of San Lorenzo (bottom right)

recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance more review check out page 358 360
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the RenaissanceMore Review? Check out Page 358-360

High Renaissance Art

  • New techniques involving scientific observations
  • Center of Renaissance shifted to Rome
  • Dominated by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo.

Primary Source #1 *** “Occasionally…, a single person is marvelously endowed by heaven with beauty, grace, and talent in such abundance that he leaves other men far behind… An artist who displayed infinite grace and cultivated his genius so brilliantly.”

–Giorgio Vasari on da Vinci (Lives of the Artists) ***

  • Stressed the tradition of details (dissecting human bodies!) Perfectly proportioned and 3D.
recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance1
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the Renaissance

Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man (left,) Mona Lisa (right,) and The Last Supper (below.)

recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance2
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the Renaissance

Left: Raphael’s School of Athens

Right: Michelangelo’s David

Below: Michelangelo’s Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel

recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance more review check out page 361 362
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the RenaissanceMore Review? Check out Page 361-362

Northern Renaissance Art

  • Gothic cathedrals/stained glass windows
  • DETAIL (due to limited space and great care)
  • Imitated nature by details not perspective
  • Oil painting (variety of colors)
recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance3
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the Renaissance

Left Side: Albrecht Durer’s The Adoration of the Magi

Right Side: Jan Van Eyck’s Giovanni Arnolfini and His Bride

recovery and rebirth the age of the renaissance more review check out page 362
Recovery and Rebirth: The Age of the RenaissanceMore Review? Check out Page 362
  • Music
  • Guillame Dufay  change in contribution to mass; secular tunes replacing Gregorian chants
  • Music used to be used chiefly in the service of God. However, it had moved become more secular
  • Madrigal: 12 line poems written in the vernacular and set to music; 5-6 voices; “text painting” (portray literal meaning of the text)
reformation and religious warfare in the sixteenth century more review see page 374 375
Reformation and Religious Warfare in the Sixteenth Century More Review? See page 374-375
  • The Northern Renaissance affected the ideas of humanism.
  • Northern humanists had a knowledge of the classics that made them want to return to the writings on antiquity.
  • Their focus was on early religion – which was important to their reform program.
  • A very important northern humanist was Erasmus. He was preoccupied with religion. He re-wrote the new Testament in a Latin translation. He wrote the famous Praise of Folly.
  • Another humanist was Thomas More. His most famous work was Utopia, a masterpiece on the account of an idealistic life. It reflected his ideas on politics, economics, and social problems.
europe and the new world new encounters 1500 1800 more review check out pages 414 and 431
Europe and the New World: New Encounters, 1500-1800More Review? Check out pages 414 and 431

-Obviously, the artwork and literature during this time period revolved around the expansion and exploration of the adventurers.

-The Port of Lisbon by Theodore de Bry depicts the harbor and the ships with the lateen sails.

-The Portuguese Arriving at Nagasaki is a piece of artwork that shows how the Portuguese accidentally landed in Japan. The eventually were arriving regularly and participated in a regional trading network with Japan, China, and Southeast Asia. (see left)

slide14
Europe and the New World: New Encounters, 1500-1800More Review? Check out the yellow primary sources excerpts
  • Oftentimes, explorers kept journals to keep track of their discoveries. Afonso de Albuquerque wrote what was later turned into The Commentaries of the Great Afonso de Albuquerque. Bartolome de Las Casa wrote The Tears of the Indians.
mannerism
Mannerism
  • Replaced Renaissance art in Italy starting in 1520s-1530s
  • Very dramatic, emotional, intense, unproportional, and religiously based-the opposite of previous styles

Laocoön by El Greco(1541-1614)

-Elongated and distorted figures

-Yellow and green against eerie background intend to draw deep emotions

baroque
Baroque

Combination of the Renaissance and revival of religious devotion from the Reformation

-Dramatic-Magnificent-Detailed-Search for Power-Sensuous-

  • Supplanted Mannerism in the late 1500s in Italy and eventually spread throughout Europe and to Latin America
  • Fully accepted by the Catholic courts, especially those of the Habsburgs in Madrid, Prague, Viennaand Brussels
  • Resisted in France, England and the Netherlands
  • Peter Paul Rubens 1577-1640The Landing of Medici at Marseilles
  • Artemisia Gentileschi 1593-1653 Judith Beheading Holofernes
  • Gian Lorenzo Bernini 1593-1680 Ecstasy of St. Theresa & Throne of St. Peter
slide17

-Throne of Saint Peter (left)

-Ecstasy of Saint Teresa (bottom)

-Both by Bernini

Judith Beheading Holofernes

By Gentileschi

The Landing of Marie de’ Medici and Marseilles by Rubens

french classicism dutch realism
French Classicism Dutch Realism
  • Overtook Italy as leader of culture roughly in the second half of the 17thcentury
  • Emphasized simplicity, clarity, harmony, balance, much like the High Renaissance, much the opposite of Baroque
  • The change in artistic style reflected the change in politics, from chaos to order
  • Grandeur still existed in portrayal of nobles
  • Paintings of everyday, secular activities & self-portraits
  • Judith Leyster-(c. 1609-1660) had her own career and was the first female member of Guild of St. Luke. Self-portrait-left
  • Rembrandt Van Rijn-(1609-1669) very popular because of his early paintings, as he aged, he began depicting bible scenes and lost support. Syndics of the Cloth Guild

-right

literature and theatre of the 1600s
Literature and Theatre of the 1600s

Lit.

-Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes demonstrated his beliefs about the selfish, nasty nature of human beings

-Two Treatise of Government by John Locke explained his

ideas that people possess natural rights-life, liberty and property

Theatre

-Performing arts flourished all through Europe

  • In England, through the works of William Shakespeare, in Spain through Lope de Vega and in France through Jean-Baptiste Racine and Jean-Baptiste Molière
  • English and Spanish theatres were affordable enough for common citizens to attend
  • French playwrights were normally for the elite
primary source 2 william shakespeare
Primary Source #2-William Shakespeare
  • William Shakespeare was a famous playwright who used his versatile skills to reflect the English people during the Elizabethan era. This is shown in Richard II-

“This blessed plot, this earth, this real, this England/This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings/Feared by their breed and famous by their birth/ Renowned for their deeds as far from home,”

slide21

Literature during the Scientific RevolutionDuring the scientific revolution, literature revolved around science and philosophy due to current events of the time period.

Title of Book

1-On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres

2-The Starry Messenger

3-Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems: Ptolemaic and Copernican

4-Principia

5-On the Fabric of the Human Body

6-On the Motion of the Heart and Blood

7-Observations upon Experimental Philosophy

8-Grounds of Natural Philosophy

9-Metamorphosis of the Insects of Surinam

10-Discourse on Method

11-Pensées

Author

1-Nicolaus Copernicus

2-Galileo

3-Galileo

4-Newton

5-Vesalius

6-William Harvey

7-Margaret Cavendish

8-Maragret Cavendish

9-Maria Merian

10-Descartes

11-Pascal

rococo in the enlightenment
Rococo in the Enlightenment
  • Arose in the 1730s
  • Gentle and graceful
  • Often pictured nature
  • Wispy and light brush strokes give a soft feel to paintings
  • The topics of love and happiness dominated this form of art
  • Antoine Watteau painted with the Rococo style
slide23

Return From Cythera- Antoine Watteau

The Swing-Antoine Watteau

neoclassicism
Neoclassicism

-Dominated the seventeenth and still largely popular

-Emerged in France in the late eighteenth century

-Influenced by the simplicity of ancient Greece and Rome

Jaques-Louis David-Death of Marat(left)

Journalist Jean-Paul Marat, shortly after being

murdered by Marie-Anne Charlotte Corday who

was later executed

Three Horatius brothers swore an oath before their

father to pledge their lives to their country

literature romanticism
Literature & Romanticism
  • The Novel- developed in further in the eighteenth century.
  • The English established the modern novel
  • Novelists

-Samuel Richardson Pamela/ Virtue Rewarded

-Henry Fielding The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

  • There was an expansion in the reading public and publishing
  • Magazines and newspapers were popular at this time as well
  • Romanticism stressed that knowledge should come from emotions, intuition and imagination instead of from reason
primary source 3
Primary Source #3

The Frenchman, Rousseau was known as the father of romanticism yet he also had political ideas which were very controversial.

“How to find a form of association which will defend the person and goods of each member with the collective force of all, and under which each individual, while uniting himself with others, obeys no one but himself and remains as free as before.” This is the fundamental problem to which the social contract holds the solution…-The Social Contract

trivia
Trivia!

Pay attention and raise your hand to try and get a prize! 

-Name two works of art by SandroBottecelli

slide28

Two works of art by Botticelli are:

  • Primavera and Birth of Venus
  • Emphasis on the mathematical side of painting proportion, organization using geometry,
  • Realistic portrayals of the human body (including nudes)
  • Realistic relationship between figures/background (three dimensional visual representation)
slide30

Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa

  • New techniques involving scientific observations
  • Center of Renaissance shifted to Rome
  • Dominated by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo.
slide31

___________Art

  • Gothic cathedrals/stained glass windows
  • DETAIL (due to limited space and great care)
  • Imitated nature by details not perspective
  • Oil painting (variety of colors)
  • Fill in the blank!
slide32

Northern Renaissance Art

  • Gothic cathedrals/stained glass windows
  • DETAIL (due to limited space and great care)
  • Imitated nature by details not perspective
  • Oil painting (variety of colors)
slide34

Replaced Renaissance art in Italy starting in 1520s-1530s

  • Very dramatic, emotional, intense, unproportional, and religiously based-the opposite of previous styles
  • Laocoön by El Greco
slide35

Type of art?

  • Definition: Combination of the Renaissance and revival of religious devotion from the Reformation
slide36

Baroque art

  • Examples: Peter Paul Rubens 1577-1640The Landing of Medici at Marseilles
  • Artemisia Gentileschi 1593-1653 Judith Beheading Holofernes
  • Gian Lorenzo Bernini 1593-1680 Ecstasy of St. Theresa & Throne of St. Peter
slide37

Dutch Realism French Classicism

TRUE OR FALSE?

  • Overtook Italy as leader of culture roughly in the second half of the 17th century
  • Emphasized simplicity, clarity, harmony, balance, much like the High Renaissance, much the opposite of Baroque
  • The change in artistic style reflected the change in politics, from chaos to order
  • Grandeur still existed in portrayal of nobles
  • Paintings of everyday, secular activities & self-portraits
  • Judith Leyster-(c. 1609-1660) had her own career and was the first female member of Guild of St. Luke. Self-portrait-left
  • Rembrandt Van Rijn-(1609-1669) very popular because of his early paintings, as he aged, he began depicting bible scenes and lost support. Syndics of the Cloth Guild
slide38

French Classicism Dutch Realism

  • Overtook Italy as leader of culture roughly in the second half of the 17th century
  • Emphasized simplicity, clarity, harmony, balance, much like the High Renaissance, much the opposite of Baroque
  • The change in artistic style reflected the change in politics, from chaos to order
  • Grandeur still existed in portrayal of nobles
  • Paintings of everyday, secular activities & self-portraits
  • Judith Leyster-(c. 1609-1660) had her own career and was the first female member of Guild of St. Luke. Self-portrait-left
  • Rembrandt Van Rijn-(1609-1669) very popular because of his early paintings, as he aged, he began depicting bible scenes and lost support. Syndics of the Cloth Guild
  • FALSE
  • (column names should have been switched in previous slide!)
slide42

Rococo

  • Arose in the 1730s
  • Gentle and graceful
  • Often pictured nature
  • Wispy and light brush strokes give a soft feel to paintings
  • The topics of love and happiness dominated this form of art
  • Antoine Watteau painted with the Rococo style
slide44

The Novel- developed in further in the eighteenth century.

  • The English established the modern novel
  • Novelists

-Samuel Richardson Pamela/ Virtue Rewarded

-Henry Fielding The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling

  • There was an expansion in the reading public and publishing
  • Magazines and newspapers were popular at this time as well
  • Romanticism stressed that knowledge should come from emotions, intuition and imagination instead of from reason