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27 th Voorburg Group Meeting Warsaw, Poland Operational Efficiency Strategies Session (Survey Design Considerations for Supporting Industry-by-Product Estimates for the Service Annual Survey). presented by Mark E. Wallace Chief, Service Sector Statistics Division U.S. Census Bureau

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

27th Voorburg Group Meeting

Warsaw, Poland

Operational Efficiency Strategies Session

(Survey Design Considerations for Supporting Industry-by-Product Estimates for the Service Annual Survey)

presented by

Mark E. Wallace

Chief, Service Sector Statistics Division

U.S. Census Bureau

mark.e.wallace@census.gov

October 1–5, 2012

agenda
Agenda
  • Introduction, Background, and Challenge
  • Meeting the Challenge - 3 Different Phases
  • Outcome
  • Conclusion and Next Steps
  • Questions
introduction background and challenge
Introduction, Background, and Challenge
  • Requests for industry-by-product detail for service industries since the 1980s, primarily from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA)
  • The 2007 Economic Census included the first-time collection of a rich variety of service industry-by-product detail
  • Expansion of industry coverage in the SAS (began for 2009 and expanded industry-by-product coverage began for 2011)
  • Pre-expansion and Post-expansion service industries in the Service Annual Survey
slide5

Pre-Expansion and Post-Expansion Service Industries in the Service Annual Survey (continued)

Total of Pre-expansion NAICS (30% of GDP) and Post-expansion NAICS (25% of GDP) = 55% of GDP

introduction background and challenge continued
Introduction, Background, and Challenge (continued)
  • It was necessary for the Census Bureau and BEA to determine priorities for specific industry-by-product combinations due to the availability of limited resources
  • Sample selection for prior SAS samples (e.g., 2000, 2006) did not account for industry-by-product combinations, resulting in:
    • High CVs
    • High imputation rates
  • 2007 Economic Census included 2,000 new products across more than 350 service industries and would serve as important input into developing potentially collectable and publishable industry-by-product combinations for the 2011 SAS onward
  • Funding for current service expansion received in 2009 made it possible to carry out the expansion
  • New sample for SAS selected for 2011 data year, with work beginning in 2009
introduction background challenge continued
Introduction, Background, & Challenge (continued)
  • Design a sample that will meet target CVs
  • For the first time use product CVs in the sample design
  • Design a sample for products & industries never collected in the SAS
  • Limit sample size to approximately 70,000 units to accommodate resource and funding constraints
meeting the challenge 3 distinct phases
Meeting the Challenge3 Distinct Phases

Phase 1: Working with BEA to get initial list of industry-by-product priorities prior to feasibility research

Phase 2: Researching the feasibility of BEA’s industry-by-product priorities

Phase 3: Working with BEA to get a final list of industry-by-product priorities

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Meeting the Challenge (continued)Phase 1-Working with BEA to Get Initial List of Industry-by-Product Priorities Prior to Feasibility Research

  • Obtaining a list of industry-by-product combinations BEA was requesting for the pre-expansion industries and for the post-expansion industries
  • Initially, obtained additional industry-by-product combinations without identifying any existing industry-by-product combinations that could be eliminated from the SAS forms (due to non-reportability, high coefficients of variation, high imputation rates, or lack of economic significance-not enough companies could report a specific product)
  • Begin focus on pre-expansion industry-by-product combinations, and determine whether they would require additional sampling units (for those that had CVs higher than 20%)
  • See Attachment B of paper for the industry-by-product combinations identified during Phase 1 for the pre-expansion industries, along with an indication of whether they would require additional sampling units
slide10

Excerpt of Attachment B from Paper: Industry-by-Product Combinations Identified During Phase 1 for NAICS 51721, Wireless Telecommunications Carriers (except Satellite)

meeting the challenge phase 2 researching the feasibility of bea s industry by product priorities
Meeting the ChallengePhase 2 – Researching the Feasibility of BEA’s Industry-by-Product Priorities
  • Researching reportabilityof products for pre-expansion industries (e.g., contacting companies for record keeping and reporting practices
  • Using industry-by-product data from the Economic Census
  • Using prior (2005-2008) SAS estimates for pre-expansion industries
  • See Attachment C of paper for the industry-by-product combinations previously identified by BEA in Phase 1 (see Attachment B) that were subsequently designated to be dropped
  • Examining products for post-expansion industries
  • See Attachment D of paper for industry-by-product combinations that could be added for post-expansion industries without requiring additional sampling units
slide12
Meeting the ChallengePhase 3 – Working with BEA to Get a Final List of Industry-by-Product Priorities
  • Discuss results of Phase 1 and Phase 2 with BEA
  • Present “Cost” of pre-expansion industry-by-product combinations where sample size would need to increase
  • Provide a mechanism for BEA to prioritize industry-by-product combinations to be included in the Service Annual Survey
  • See Attachment E of paper for the spreadsheet tool provided to BEA by the Census Bureau for prioritizing industry-by-product combinations to be included in the Service Annual Survey
outcome
Outcome
  • BEA’s choices resulted in being 1150 sampling units under budget
  • Extra available sampling units allowed us to expand the sample size for a few health industries, resulting in the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Studies receiving estimates of source of funding for additional industries
conclusion and next steps
Conclusion and Next Steps
  • The 2012 Business Sample Revision achieved its goal of considering industry-by-product combinations in the design of the SAS sample
  • A carefully planned and implemented three-phase approach produced an outcome that maximized the usefulness of SAS industry-by-product data for BEA, while maintaining sustainable workload and resource levels
  • Next steps will be to:
    • Evaluate the results of the 2011 SAS
    • For expansion industries, determine what possible additional industry level estimates to provide to BEA
    • Make necessary adjustments to future SAS forms based on:
      • Ongoing BEA needs
      • Reporting issues
      • Consistency with the Economic Census products
      • Sample size & burden considerations
    • Research how to incorporate the 2012 Economic Census results into future sample designs