Download
ministry of education review presentation february 1 2012 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION REVIEW PRESENTATION February 1, 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION REVIEW PRESENTATION February 1, 2012

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION REVIEW PRESENTATION February 1, 2012

216 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION REVIEW PRESENTATION February 1, 2012

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. MINISTRY OF EDUCATION REVIEW PRESENTATION February 1, 2012 Student Support Services

  2. Welcome GSSD Parents Cindy Costigan Carolyn Debnam Leshia Sanderson GSSD Student Services StaffIris Rowlett – Central Cluster SSCTracy Huckell – South Cluster SSCAdelle Kopp-McKay – North Cluster SSCQuintin Robertson – Sup’t of Student ServicesCarol McCullough – EAL Co-ordinator Andrea Hnatiuk - Literacy Coach Michele Haczkewicz - SLP GSSD School Based Staff Darran Teneycke – Principal Jana Szabo - SST Partner Organizations Jacquie Holzmann – Sunrise Health Region Ministry of EducationCorey Hadden Shelley AdamsHorizon School DivisionDarrell Paproski – Sup’t of Student Services Student Support Services StaffGood Spirit School Division Senior Leadership TeamDwayne Reeve – Director of Education Sherry Todosichuk – Sup’t of BusinessJuanita Brown – Sup’t of Instruction Susan Maserek – Sup’t of SchoolsWithman Jaigobin – Sup’t of Schools

  3. Intensive Review Process Over the next 10 minutes we will review the following: 2011/2012 Student Support Services Review Draft Agenda Purpose of the Intensive Review The GSSD Motto, Mission, Vision, and Values The GSSD Student Population Numbers GSSD Student Services Vision GSSD Continuum of Supports for All Students

  4. Purpose of theIntensive Review Following principles of continuous improvement, the Student Support Services Delivery Model Review Process provides an opportunity for the Ministry of Education and the Good Spirit School Division to engage in strategic discussions. Collaboratively, we hope to explore: What is working? What is tricky? What might we do differently in the future? Our Student Services Team has framed the work we are doing this year under three areas: Collaboration, Capacity Building and Communication.

  5. MOTTO “Students Come First” MISSION “Excelling Through Student Learning” VISION “Together Inspiring Passion For Learning – Excelling Now – Succeeding Tomorrow” VALUES Integrity, Empathy, Growth, Equity Motto, Mission, Vision & Values

  6. We operate 28 schools in 17 communities throughout East Central Saskatchewan. Student Population NumbersSeptember 30, 2011 Total student enrolment: 6197 Students new to GSSD: 282 FTE: 414.27 Students transferring from out of province: 60 Students transferring from another country: 28 Home Based Education Students: 152 Students on Personal Program Plans: 295 (5%)

  7. Student Services Vision The Good Spirit School Division has adopted the vision for supporting student diversity that has been defined by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Education. This vision promotes the inclusion of all students in their neighborhood schools and is based on exemplary practices and evidence-based research. Services and support to all learners are provided through a response to intervention model of service delivery. GSSD Student Services VISION

  8. Continuum Of Support For ALL Students For all students in GSSD we strive to: Provide highly effective, research-based core instruction Identify what we want all students to learn (ELOs) Systematically identify students who are not succeeding in our core program Provide students additional time, resources and support until they achieve success Improve Core program – UBD modules, PLCs, common assessment, etc... Utilize a variety of universal screening tools: AFL, F&P, RAD, CAT 4, Math Benchmarks, CBMs (from Chris Weber’s presentation in Sept. 2011)

  9. Continuum of Student Supports & Interventions

  10. Over the next 60 minutes the GSSD Student Services Team will review the following information: 2010/2011 School Review Process GSSD 2010/2011 School Review Data GSSD Student Service Strategic Plans GSSD Student Services Goals for 2011/2012 SECTION 1:Service Delivery Rubric Priority Areas

  11. In the past, each school discussed their proposed staffing for the upcoming year and their successes and challenges in meeting student needs individually with their cluster Student Services Co-ordinator The Student Services Department altered this format this year. We felt that bringing administrators together to discuss successes and challenges builds capacity and collaboration, as well as facilitated a deeper understanding of Ministry’s strategic direction 2010/2011 School Review Rational for Change

  12. Administrators were given the Service Delivery Model Rubrics & the Preliminary Staffing Document to complete with their staff Administrators brought the completed Service Delivery Model Rubrics & the Preliminary Staffing Document to their assigned reviews days for discussion and submission The intended audience for the Review Days included School Administrators(s), Student Support Teacher(s), and a classroom teacher(s) The following Division Level Personnel also attended the three day event: Sup’t of Schools, Student Services Co-ordinators, and Sup’t of Student Services 2010/2011 School Review Process

  13. 2010 & 2011School Review Data INTERVENTION PLAN Evident – Referral Process Evident – Personal Program Plans (PPP) Evident – Transition Planning Emerging – Service Coordination INCLUSIONARY PHILOSOPHY & BELIEFS Evident – Inclusive Practice Evident – Differentiated Instruction Evident – Parental/Caregiver Engagement Evident – Assessment Emerging – Multi-Disciplinary Team Evident – Fostering Independence Emerging – Assistive Technology

  14. STAFFING PROFILE Evident - Student Support Services Teacher Qualifications Evident - Supportive In-service Training for Teachers Evident - Provision for, & Engagement of, Supporting Professionals Evident - Facilitation of School Team Collaboration Evident - Support of Educational Assistants Evident - Engagement of Supporting Agencies Emerging - Administrative Support of Inclusive Classrooms 2010 & 2011School Review Data

  15. Planning to Improve Designing new procedures & methods: Autism Pro Circle of Care Project Leveled Literacy Intervention Partnership between Curriculum & Student Services Master Teacher Software and PD for all SSTs Inter-disciplinary Team Meetings Team Based Referral Intake Process Team Orientation Training for Support Staff EA Interview Guide and Rubric Piloting new Inclusion and Intervention Plan with the support of the Ministry and TPM Redesign existing procedures/services: PSP Block Therapy: Example 1, Example 2 Staffing Allotment (increase in SST & PSP staffing) Professional Service Provider PLCs PSP Cluster Assignments Increased Focus on Collaboration/Capacity Building/Communication What Are Our Drivers for Change? • School Review Results • Ministry of Education Direction • Parental Feedback • Staff Feedback • Research ‍Planning to Operate • Intensive Supports Committee and Procedures • PPP Timelines • Impact Assessment Utilization • Roles and Responsibilities of SSTs Strategic Plan

  16. Action Plan SSTs will be introduced to the Master Teacher Software, given training on the software, and provided release time to complete 1 or 2 modules Remaining 2 Positive Path Forward Meetings will allow time to complete the remaining modules SSTs will be encouraged to complete more than the 6 required modules on their own time Support of School Personnel • 98% of SSTs will successfully complete 6 self-directed modules from Master Teacher by June 2012. 2011/12 Goals

  17. Action Plan The Inter-disciplinary meeting process will provide support and build capacity in teachers, PSPs, Administration, etc…. (2 to 3 times per year for selected students) The referral intake meeting process and monthly review will be utilized to increase accountability on school staff & PSPs Defined procedures for interdisciplinary team, referral intake, intensive support committee meetings will increase transparency and communication between the division office and schools Building an inter-professional team By June 2012, GSSD Student Services Rubric ratings will increase to at least 3.5 as measured by a survey completed by SSTs, administrators and PSPs. 2011/12 Goals

  18. Over the next 30 minutes we will discuss the following information: GSSD Inter-professional Collaboration with GSSD Darran Teneycke will give an administrator impression of IPC process for teachers & students Michele Haczkewicz will give a PSPs impression of the IPC process for service providers GSSD Staffing Ratios for PSP and Student Services Personnel Continuous Improvement & Professional Learning Communities in the Student Services Department SECTION 2:Staffing Profile/Inter-Professional Collaboration (IPC)

  19. Staffing Ratios for Professional Service Providers and Student Services Personnel

  20. Continuous Improvement: Student Services Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) This year, all of our Professional Service Providers (Educational Psychologists, Occupational Therapists/Speech and Language Pathologists, School Counsellors and Student Services Co-ordinators) have united to form profession-specific PLCs or learning communities. In line with the Ministry Strategic Priorities, these PLCs have delineated the following long and short term goals:

  21. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  22. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  23. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  24. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  25. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  26. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  27. Continuous Improvement in Student Services

  28. SECTION 3:English as an Additional Language/Immigration Over the next 15 minutes Carol will review the following information: GSSD approaches to assessment of language proficiency GSSD EAL numbers and distribution GSSD EAL Handbook

  29. SECTION 3:English as an Additional LanguageApproaches to Assessment Informal Assessment of listening, speaking, reading, writing and vocabulary skills for K-3. (Includes knowledge of alphabet, letter sounds, numbers, colours, shapes, school items, body parts, following simple directions, telling a story using a picture, writing words and sentences) Woodcock-Munoz Language Survey

  30. SECTION 3:English as an Additional LanguageEAL Numbers for 2011 & 12 17 schools out of 28 in the Good Spirit School Division reported EAL students Total reported students as of January 25 = 137 21 assessments completed since the beginning of 2011-12 school year Since September, 2011, one-to-one contact with 39 EAL students and more than 30 teachers and EAs who work with EAL students

  31. SECTION 3:English as an Additional LanguageCountries & Languages Represented Countries: Philippines, South Korea, Ukraine, Serbia, Hong Kong, China, Poland, Germany, Netherlands, Guatemala, Israel, Honduras, Ireland, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, Japan, Libya, Nigeria, Taiwan, Thailand, Slovakia, Canada Languages: Tagalog, Ilocano, Korean, Ukrainian, Russian, Serbian, Cantonese, Mandarin, Polish, German, Dutch, Spanish, Hindi, Tamil, Japanese, Arabic, Gujarati, Yoruba, Thai, Bangla, Urdu, Taiwanese, Slovak, Cree, Sioux

  32. SECTION 3:English as an Additional LanguageProtocols & Procedures EAL Registration Form EAL Referral Form Informal contact: E-mail, phone calls Required from the school prior to assessment: student’s name, sex, birth date and year, grade placement, country of origin, first language and arrival date in Canada

  33. SECTION 3:English as an Additional LanguageImmigration Forecast Sunrise Health Region is actively recruiting nursing staff internationally at the present time. Some of the recruits are presently in Canada taking the necessary equivalency training. In most cases, their families have not yet immigrated, but will follow once employment is secured. 28% of the nurses in Sunrise Health Region are eligible to retire in 2012. Nurses eligible for retirement will increase to 33% by 2015. Potential for more immigration with the proposed expansions in the potash industry south of Melville.

  34. SECTION 4:Parent and/or Interagency Partnerships Over the next 20 minutes Jacquie & Quintin will review the following information: Progress on protocols with other agencies Feedback gathered over the last 18 months from parents/caregivers, PSPs, and administrators as it relates to what is currently working, what is tricky and what needs to be done differently.

  35. Community Connections

  36. Community Connections

  37. Parent Participant Feedback • What is working? • What is tricky? • What might we do differently in the future?

  38. Proactive approach is being implemented more than one-time assessment • Supportive coordinators • Very caring co-workers • All school team members (SST, CT, family, EA, PSPs) are working as a team to strive to meet the programming needs of students. This takes ongoing communication and consultation. • “I, as a service provider, strive to provide a consistent approach to ongoing assessment and intervention”. • “I see an increase in classroom teachers taking more initiative in working directly with intensive needs students”. • “I believe that there is more communication between PSPs than there has been. As well, the format of the PPPs is being understood better and therefore is a more useful method of intervention”. • I feel that when used properly, our continuum of services can work well. When PSPs and teachers work together with the continuum, students’ needs are better met. • The acquisition of equipment and assistive technology through Student Services is an important component of what is working well Prof. Service Provider (PSP) Feedback:What Is Working?

  39. There is lack of time to do follow-up services from assessments and to evaluate the recommendations to see what is working. • It is difficult to get schools to implement recommendations and then collect data to see if there is progress in a student. • Limited availability of PSPs – would like to see additional professional support. • “I feel that there needs to be more SST and perhaps CT time dedicated to the actual program delivery of students with intensive needs. In some cases, it seems that the EAs are doing a considerable amount of program planning. • Prioritizing preventative programming – challenging for PSPs to be proactive as opposed to reactive. PSP Feedback:What Is Tricky?

  40. PSP Feedback:What Might We Do Differently In The Future? • Less meetings • Scheduling more CT, PSP and SST time together could be facilitated by administration • Continue to explore accessing additional PSP time as another option to paraprofessional supports

  41. PSP Participant Feedback • What is working? • What is tricky? • What might we do differently in the future?

  42. Clear sense of purpose from the school division • Educational Assistant training and qualifications are valued • Excellent service providers • Timely and effective support from the SSCs; concerns are easier to address • Process for accessing student support is working • Superintendent is visible in the schools and approachable • Schools feels strongly supported by the GSSD Student Support team at all levels • Transparency of decision-making process around student support time • PPPs are workable for teachers Administrator Feedback:What Is Working?

  43. Finding a balance between Ministry and GSSD requirements and grassroots initiatives • Timeliness of PSP assessments, reports and follow-up • Wait-time for assessments can be long • PSPs are not always aware of school procedures (e.g. check-ins upon arrival) Administrator Feedback:What Is Tricky?

  44. Increase qualified support personnel working directly with classroom teachers (SLPs, Psychologists, Counsellors, OTs, SSTs) • Make better use of PSP support presently in the school • Development of greater efficiency in providing supports when students transfer • Improve timeliness in filling student services vacancies (SSTs, EAs, PSPs) • Decrease “red tape” and streamline paperwork requirements • Decrease reliance on assessment results and increase actual time with students Administrator Feedback:What Might We Do Differently In The Future?

  45. Administrator Participant Feedback • What is working? • What is tricky? • What might we do differently in the future?

  46. SECTION 5:Enhancing Accountability for Students Identified as Receiving Supports • Over the next 20 minutes we will review the following: • For high school students identified as receiving intensive supports, review credit attainment (information provided by the Ministry) • GSSD Transition Guide • Transition Guide for Students in High School with Intensive Needs

  47. MINISTRY OF EDUCATIONOctober 21, 2011SDS Number of Credits Earned by Students with Intensive Supports, by Support Level • Includes all students in the SDS who earned a credit at a school that reports to a school division. • The student’s support date window must be within the school year to be included. • If a school division is not listed, there is no data available (no credits earned at the division by students with intensive supports). • A student could potentially be counted at more than one school division if the student earned credits from more than one school division. A separate row at the bottom for Provincial Total give an accurate representation of the province view.

  48. MINISTRY OF EDUCATIONOctober 21, 2011SDS Number of Credits Earned by Students with Intensive Supports, by Support Level and Course Type • Includes all students in the SDS who earned a credit at a school that reports to a school division. • The student’s support date window must be within the school year to be included. • If a school division is not listed, there is no data available (no credits earned at the division by students with intensive supports). • A student could potentially be counted at more than one school division if the student earned credits from more than one school division. A separate row at the bottom for Provincial Total give an accurate representation of the province view.

  49. SECTION 6:Future Directions & Collaborative Problem-Solving • Over the next 20 minutes Andrea, Darran & Quintin will review the following: • What is occurring at the universal and targeted levels for students, to reduce the number identified with intensive needs • Levelled Literacy Intervention • Do The Math

  50. Continued promotion of Universal Design concepts within the classroom - Universal Design in action at Victoria School • Focus on “Assistive Technology” standards in elementary, middle years, and high school classrooms – potential partnership with the Ministry • Non Violent Crisis Intervention & PBIS training for all schools • Professional Service Provider PLCs • Professional Growth Plans for PSPs – reviewed in the fall, mid year and spring • Performance Appraisals for PSPs • PSP Referral/Intake Process – utilization of technology to enhance collaboration Future Directions