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Professional Learning for Mathematics Leaders and Coaches— Not just a 3-part series. Day 2. Four Corners activity. •Go to the corner for the View and Discuss between-session opportunity you took advantage of OR are most interested in. 2. Four Corners activity.

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Day 2


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    1. Professional Learning for Mathematics Leaders and Coaches—Not just a 3-part series Day 2

    2. Four Corners activity •Go to the corner for the View and Discuss between-session opportunity you took advantage of OR are most interested in. 2

    3. Four Corners activity •Share some of your observations and/or thoughts with those from other boards in your corner. 3

    4. More sharing •Did you try out any goal setting/question writing activities related to our last session? • Share what happened with a partner. 4

    5. Responses to Sticky Note Pileup •If you tried this activity, what was it connected to? (e.g. norms for collaborative group work) •What was the value to you, your students or fellow colleagues? •How else could you use it? 5

    6. Sticky Note Pileup Exemplar 6

    7. Responses to professional learning protocols sample •For those of you who have been coached or been a coach, which of these protocols is one requiring more focus for you? Why? 7

    8. Responding to Day 1 Questions We’re listening

    9. Responding to Day 1 Questions We’re listening

    10. Responding to Day 1 Questions • more time to work on consolidation/examples • more big ideas/from where? • order in PPQT • handling consolidation in classrooms 10

    11. Questions from Day 1 •If you have any other outstanding questions from Day 1, please post these on our parking lot.

    12. Revised Agenda 12

    13. What was our focus in Day 1? We looked at the ideas that: •when planning a lesson, you design backwards: focus in on a goal and plan your lesson around that goal.

    14. What was our focus in Day 1? •the goal for a lesson is created based on curriculum expectations, but filtered through the lens of big ideas

    15. What was our focus in Day 1? •question(s) to consolidate the goal are essential and may inform other parts of the lesson

    16. What was our focus in Day 1? • responses to consolidating question(s) are useful assessment for learning information.

    17. What was our focus in Day 1? •The consolidation question(s) need to reflect the goal, whether the lesson is a concept-building lesson or a practice lesson.

    18. What was our focus in Day 1? •The consolidation question(s) is more than just “do another one”.

    19. Now let’s change direction a bit • We have been focusing on the math. • Now let’s focus on the students.

    20. Thinking about differentiating •Let’s look at a problem we might plan to use to see how thinking about difficulties students might have could lead you to alter the problem or differentiate the task.

    21. Suppose this is the scenario..

    22. Suppose.. • You want your students to solve this problem. Brandon and Alexis counted their money. Together, they had $7.50, but Brandon had $2.90 more than Alexis.

    23. Brandon and Alexis counted their money. Together, they had $7.50, but Brandon had $2.90 more than Alexis. a) How much did each have? b) How do you know there are no other answers?

    24. Let’s talk… Let’s make a “top 5” list of anticipated difficulties.

    25. Look at one approach • Have a look at the hand-out showing one approach to dealing with a possible difficulty. • In pairs,suggest an alternate problem based on a possible difficulty.

    26. Let’s talk • How did your alternate problem address the difficulty?

    27. This approach might lead to… differentiating instruction, maybe offering one problem to some students and another to others.

    28. DI requires •a focus on big ideas (to have something big enough to differentiate)

    29. DI requires •prior assessment (to know the need and direction to differentiate)

    30. Anticipation Guide for Grade 8 Algebra Agree or disagree. Explain.

    31. Exit Card, Day 1

    32. DI requires •choice (to actually differentiate)

    33. What many of us do now •The conventional approach to differentiating is to scaffold-- presenting problems in bits. Maybe this is not the only or the best way, to differentiate.

    34. Our focus… • will be on two strategies: • Parallel tasks • Open questions

    35. You’ve met them •Remember Day 1’s open question about creating a linear growing pattern beginning at -10 that grew slowly?

    36. You’ve met them •Remember Day 1’s task where you matched questions to big ideas but different groups used different questions?

    37. Anticipated difficulty •By anticipating the “difficulty” some grade 7-9 teachers might have with grade 11 or 12 content, we differentiated the task.

    38. In parallel tasks.. •We look at the same instructional goal, with the anticipated student difficulty addressed.

    39. We could… •Look at your listing of alternative Brandon/Alexis questions. • You may have already created parallel tasks.

    40. All that’s missing… •is how to handle the class when different students work on different tasks focused on the same goal. • We’ll address that now.

    41. An example….

    42. • You plan to ask: The slope of a line is -2/3. Tell us the coordinates of two points on the line.

    43. You could anticipate… • that some students may need more time with positive slopes before they are ready for problems involving negative slopes.

    44. Looking at the goal…. •negative slopes are not really required. Students could address the goal using either positive or negative slopes.

    45. So…. •we create parallel tasks, offering choices accessible to more students.

    46. Parallel tasks •A line of slope -2/3 goes through (-4,-1). Name two more points on the line. •A line of slope 2/3 goes through (-4,-1). Name two more points on the line.

    47. Common questions • Do you know which way your line slants? How do you know?

    48. Common questions •Could (-4, 3) be on your line? How do you know? • Could (-3, 0) be on your line? How do you know?

    49. Common questions •What are your points and how did you get them? •Why did many of you choose points with x-coordinates of -1 and -7, but not -5? 49

    50. Parallel tasks •are useful particularly for the main instructional activity in a 3-part lesson.