an introduction to library programs for young people n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
An Introduction to Library Programs for Young People PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
An Introduction to Library Programs for Young People

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 35

An Introduction to Library Programs for Young People - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 119 Views
  • Uploaded on

An Introduction to Library Programs for Young People. Based on “Teens @ Your Library,” developed by Multnomah County Library www.multcolib.org All photos from “Teens @ Your Library” [Click your mouse or press the right arrow key on your keyboard to proceed]. How to Use This Tutorial.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'An Introduction to Library Programs for Young People' - penney


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
an introduction to library programs for young people

An Introduction to Library Programs for Young People

Based on “Teens @ Your Library,”

developed by Multnomah County Library

www.multcolib.org

All photos from “Teens @ Your Library”

[Click your mouse or press the right arrow key on your keyboard to proceed]

how to use this tutorial
How to Use This Tutorial

This is an at-your-own-pace online tutorial.

To navigate through the material on each page, as well as between individual pages, please use the following actions:

  • To go forward, click the right arrow key on your computer keyboard or click your mouse.
  • To back up, click the left arrow key on your keyboard.
  • You can pause at any time – no need to press any keys!
  • You can exit the tutorial by right-clicking the screen (Windows) or pressing “control” & clicking (Mac).

Ready to get started? Click your mouse or the right arrow key…

why library programs for young people
Why Library Programs for Young People?

Programs for young people are a cornerstone of library services. In fact, 25% of patrons in public libraries nationwide are teenagers!

It’s important for us to keep young people engaged so that they value libraries throughout their lifetimes.

stereotypes
Stereotypes

What are some of the stereotypes about young people?

∙Noisy ∙Disrespectful ∙Loud

∙Disorganized ∙Unpredictable

∙ Not Interested in Libraries

And yet…

Most teen behaviors that adults find obnoxious can be attributed to young adults’ developmental tasks: those emotional, social, sexual, intellectual and psychological changes that make up adolescence.

(Gorman, Jones, Suellentrop, Connecting Young Adults and Libraries, Neal-Schuman, 2005.)

slide6

After all, if all young people

ever had were “problem” behaviors…

…how did we make it to adulthood?!

activity 1
ACTIVITY #1

Take a few minutes to remember what it was like for you to be a young person:

  • What were your hopes?
  • Your frustrations?
  • What good experiences did you have with your school or public library? What challenging experiences?
  • What good experiences did you have with adults? Challenging?
activity 2
ACTIVITY #2

Now think about young people at your library…

  • How do you perceive them?
  • How do you think they perceive you/adults at your library?
  • What is unfair about these perceptions?
  • How can these perceptions be challenged?

HOMEWORK:

Repeat this activity with staff and volunteers, both youth and adults, at your library.

How do their perceptions match/challenge your own?

slide9

What do we know about young people?Sources: “Adolescent Development,” National Institute of Health (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002003.htm) and “Young Adult Development Project,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology (http://hrweb.mit.edu/worklife/youngadult/index.html)

today s youth
Today’s Youth

Young people today have grown up with the Internet, smartphones, instant messaging, texting, video games…

As library staff, we need to help them see our libraries as useful, relevant, and enjoyable parts of their lives.

here s what we know about young people
Here’s What We Know About Young People…

Early Adolescence (e.g. 11-13 years old)

  • Puberty starts earlier
  • Friends are crucial (Parents? Not so much…)
  • They want more independence
  • They are concerned about self and appearance
  • They are testing limits
what does that mean for us
What Does That Mean for Us?

Early Adolescence (e.g. 11-13 years old)

  • Allow them to “save face” around their peers, adults
  • Help them build self-esteem
  • Practice putting on a “poker face”
  • Be patient
  • Don’t assume you know their age, ethnicity or gender
  • Don’t assume their question is (or isn’t) for a school assignment
  • Don’t take it personally 
here s what we know about young people1
Here’s What We Know About Young People…

Middle Adolescence (e.g. 14-16 years old)

  • They are taking risks
  • They are developing a sense of values & morality
  • They are experimenting with self image
  • They are becoming less self-absorbed
  • They are making their own decisions
  • They are becoming sexually aware
  • They are becoming intellectually aware
  • Their interests & skills are maturing
what does that mean for us1
What Does That Mean for Us?

Middle Adolescence (e.g. 14-16 years old)

  • Greet them & check in to see how they are doing
  • Follow up on their questions
  • Don’t be fazed by appearances
  • Be consistent: as they develop their critical thinking skills, they are very aware of what’s “fair”
  • They’re looking for adult role models (Hint: This could be you)
here s what we know about young people2
Here’s What We Know About Young People…

Late Adolescence (e.g. 16-18 years old)

  • They view the world idealistically
  • They are becoming involved with the world outside their school & home
  • They see themselves as equal to adults
  • They are setting goals
  • They are seeking to firmly establish independence
what does that mean for us2
What Does That Mean for Us?

Late Adolescence (e.g. 16-18 years old)

  • They expect to be treated as adults
  • Work with them to develop opportunities for service: volunteering, helping with programs for younger kids, etc.
  • They’ll be interested in career and/or college information
  • They are interested in information for planning their future
here s what we know about young people3
Here’s What We Know About Young People…

Young Adulthood (e.g. 18-20 years old)

  • They have more complex thinking
  • They have an appreciation for diverse views
  • They exhibit more emotional regulation
  • They have an increased understanding of constructive criticism
  • They are able to weigh the impact of their choices on others
what does that mean for us3
What Does That Mean for Us?

Young Adulthood (e.g. 18-20 years old)

  • They are still in the process of becoming adults
  • Teen services shouldn’t end at high school graduation
  • Library staff continue to have an important and evolving influence on young adults
slide19

How can we best serve young people at our libraries?Source: Adapted in part from content by JT Fest Consulting (www.in4y.com)

we can encourage positive youth development
We can encourage positive youth development
  • Focus on youth assets and strengths
  • Maintain high expectations
  • Acknowledge and believe in youth skills and potential
  • Don’t let one bad interaction define your relationship
  • Offer opportunities to learn and grow in a safe environment
we can encourage positive youth development continued
We can encourage positive youth development continued…

Develop caring and supportive relationships:

  • Caring: being concerned or interested
  • Supportive: willing to act as a resource
  • Relationships: a defined association
  • Provide: clear and appropriate boundaries
we can facilitate youth adult partnerships
We can facilitate youth-adult partnerships

Create opportunities for youth participation

  • Volunteer opportunities (community events, mentoring and tutoring, summer reading programs, etc.), internships, employment opportunities, + advisory roles
  • Offer opportunities to actively partner with adults. Facilitate personal and professional skill development – for adults and youth alike!
we can facilitate youth adult partnerships1
We can facilitate youth-adult partnerships

Be sure to include youth in the planning process:

  • Develop projects and leadership roles with, not just for, young people
  • Jointly develop clear guidelines, timelines, and expectations
  • Seek the feedback and participation of young people in more than just youth services-related policies and programs
activity 3
ACTIVITY #3

Take a few minutes to think about what young people can do at your library…

What are they capable of? What do they enjoy?

What can they learn? How can the library benefit?

How can the community benefit?

HOMEWORK:

Talk to library staff to learn more about how young people are involved in library activities (volunteer manager, human resources, youth services staff, etc).

Talk to youth volunteers and/or employees: ask about their experiences and gather ideas for how the library can even better engage young people.

two volunteer projects to consider
Two volunteer projects to consider…

Project #1: Mapping the Community:

Recruit a youth volunteer to help you “map” the local community from their perspective:

  • Where are the schools?
  • Where are the places for recreation?
  • Where do young people hang out?
  • What landmarks would be on “their” map of the community?

Project #2: Discovering Demographics:

Recruit a young person to help you research the demographics of the community served by your library: cultural, religious, educational, socioeconomic, etc.

  • How have these demographics changed in the past 10 years? 20?
  • What might this mean for young people?
handling difficult situations
Handling difficult situations

Everyone has bad days and we all have examples of when we didn’t behave the most appropriately or respectfully – whether as a toddler, a teenager, or an adult!

So how can we best handle these challenging situations in a way that is respectful, professional, and acknowledges that young people are still learning and growing – often by watching what we do and how we behave?

we can deal appropriately with challenging behaviors and conflict
We can deal appropriately with challenging behaviors and conflict

Whenever possible, talk to the person in private: take them aside and ask “Can I talk to you for a minute?”

Explain the situation…then ask for their perspective. Be sure to listen!

Summarize what you heard: “This is my understanding”

Offer a reasonable solution: “This is what we’re going to do”

Give them a choice to change their behavior or leave the library

the four r s of handling disruptive behavior
The Four R’s of handling disruptive behavior

RELATIONSHIPS

Make contact: Say hello. Introduce yourself and ask their name. Smile and be genuinely friendly.

Get to know groups of teens: Be courteous. Engage the group leader.

Develop a rapport to smash through the stereotypes of “obnoxious teens” and “lame adults.”

Source: Adapted from “Connecting Young Adults and Libraries,” YALSA Publication

the four r s of handling disruptive behavior1
The Four R’s of handling disruptive behavior

RULES

Make sure rules apply fairly to everyone, not just young people. This includes loud adults, people on cell phones, etc.

Focus on the behavior, not the person.

Enforce the rules fairly, firmly, and consistently:

Don’t debate and don’t escalate.

Source: Adapted from “Connecting Young Adults and Libraries,” YALSA Publication

the four r s of handling disruptive behavior2
The Four R’s of handling disruptive behavior

REACTIONS

Manage your own reactions to the situation:

  • Listen first
  • Take a deep breath
  • Keep your cool
  • Remember that it isn’t personal
  • Maintain your sense of humor
  • Get help/back-up if you need it

Empathize: remember what it was like to be young?

Source: Adapted from “Connecting Young Adults and Libraries,” YALSA Publication

the four r s of handling disruptive behavior3
The Four R’s of handling disruptive behavior

RESPECT

Give it and you’re likely get it back.

Source: Adapted from “Connecting Young Adults and Libraries,” YALSA Publication

additional resources
Additional Resources

Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)

  • YALSA Academy: http://www.youtube.com/user/YALSA1957
    • Here are two to try:
      • Creating a Great Space for Teens: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u48E_lJriP8&list=PLC046A24B35F7950D&index=9
      • Teen Customer Service Tips: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oimsRUlMdlY
  • YALSA Blog: http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/
  • The YALSA Hub: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/thehub/

Oregon Young Adult Network (OYAN)

  • OYAN Blog: http://oyanpeeps.wordpress.com/

Search Institute

  • “40 Developmental Assets for Adolescents”: http://www.search-institute.org/content/40-developmental-assets-adolescents-ages-12-18

Multnomah County Library

  • Hosting Library Interns: http://libraryinterns.blogspot.com/
slide35

This tutorial was designed by Multnomah County Libraryin Multnomah County, Oregonas part of their D.I.Y. Intern Program – Toolkit for Success Project.This project was generously funded by a 2011-2012 grant from the State of Oregon’s Library Services & Technology Act (LSTA) Program.