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Roman Clothing By Julie Petrusa. citizen, matron, curule magistrate, emperor, general, workman, slave. The Toga. Most ancient statues do not show these stripes, but this wall painting from a lararium in Pompeii depicts both the tunica laticlavia and toga praetexta .

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Roman Clothing By Julie Petrusa


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Roman Clothing

By Julie Petrusa

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Most ancient statues do not show these stripes, but this wall painting from a lararium in Pompeii depicts both the tunica laticlavia and toga praetexta.

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Sometimes their tunics also left one shoulder uncovered, as depicted in this mosaic of a man named Frucius (whose narrow stripes indicate equestrian rank) being attended by two slaves, Myro and Victor.

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Slaves were not inevitably dressed in poor clothing, however; Junius, the young kitchen slave depicted in this mosaic, wears a more elegant tunic and a gold neckchain.

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Statues of the first empress Livia prominently display her stola, even in this one whose head has been lost, a close-up clearly shows the strap of her stola.

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We do not know a great deal about Roman underclothes, but there is evidence that women wore a simple, wrapped loincloth (subligar or subligaculum, meaning “little binding underneath”) at least some of the time. Women also sometimes wore a band of cloth or leather to support the breasts (strophium or mamillare). Both these undergarments can be seen on the women from this fourth-century CE mosaic.

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Gold coins (aurei) were often made into jewelry: a pendant with a coin of the empress Julia Domna, a pendant with garnets and a coin of the emperor Caracalla (son of Julia Domna and Septimius Severus).

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Silver was used less frequently, as in this medallion with chain or this bracelet with a portrait of a child.

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Bibliography

  • Akiko G. Kayoko S. and Seung Yeob L. Ancient Rome. March 25, 2001.
  • http://www.internet-at-work.com/hos_mcgrane/rome/eg_rome_menu1.html
  • Lin and Don Donn. Daily Life in Ancient Rome. March 25, 2001.
  • http://members.aol.com/Donnclass/Romelife.html#HAIR
  • McManus, Barbara. Roman Clothing. April 4, 2001. http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/clothing.html
  • Roma, History and Civilization of the Eternal City. March 26, 2001.
  • http://cyberfair.gsn.org/citrag/roma/eng_home.htm
  • Roman Life. March 25, 2001.
  • http://www.dl.ket.org/latin1/things/romanlife/index.htm
  • The daily life in Rome. March 26, 2001. http://library.thinkquest.org/22866/English/Romday/RomDag.html
  • The Romans Page. March 25, 2001. http://ireland.iol.ie/~coolmine/typ/romans/intro.html