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Global Food & Drink Trends Food & Drink Innovation Network Packaging Innovation by Richard Roberts, Principal Consultant Pira International 20 October 2004. Innovation. WHY INNOVATE? “The only sustainable competitive advantage comes from ‘out innovating’ the competition.” James Moore.

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Global Food & Drink Trends Food & Drink Innovation Network Packaging Innovation by Richard Roberts, Principal Co


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    1. Global Food & Drink TrendsFood & Drink Innovation NetworkPackaging InnovationbyRichard Roberts, Principal ConsultantPira International20 October 2004

    2. Innovation WHY INNOVATE? “The only sustainable competitive advantage comes from ‘out innovating’ the competition.” James Moore

    3. Innovation • Need to understand: • Consumer perspectives • Customer perspectives • Supplier perspectives

    4. 1995 Quality Cost/price Service Customer focus Investment Delivery Flexibility Technology Account Management NPD 2001 Quality Cost/price Service Innovation Partnership Supply chain Flexibility Technology Account Management NPD Innovation

    5. Single serve

    6. Single serve

    7. Innovative shapes

    8. Innovative shapes

    9. Convenience - easy dispensing

    10. Rumblers • Twinpots sleeved together

    11. Active & Intelligent Packaging

    12. Oxygen scavengers - mechanisms • Iron powder oxidation • Polymer oxidation (metal catalyst) • Ascorbic acid oxidation • Photo-activated organic compound • Enzymatic oxidation • Complexation

    13. Sachets Ageless® (MGC) Freshilizer (Toppan) Labels ATCO® (EMCO) Freshmax® (Multisorb) Selected commercially available oxygen scavenging systems

    14. Closure liners DarExtend™ (Darex) Pureseal™ (WR Grace) Oxycap (Standa Industrie) Selected commercially available oxygen scavenging systems

    15. Films, bottles, trays, cups Shelf plus ™ O2 (Ciba S.C) Oxyguard ® (Toyo Seikan) BindOX ™ (Amcor) Amosorb® DFC (BP Amoco) OS1000/2000™ (Cryovac) OSP (Chevron Phillips) ZerO2™ (CSIRO) Oxygen scavenging plastics

    16. Benefits of oxygen scavengers • Extend shelf-life • reduce distribution losses • reduce spoilage claims • Meets consumer demand for natural foods • eliminate or reduce food additives • reduce use of sugar and/or salt • maintain nutritional value • Reduce need for extremely low levels of O2 in MAP • accelerated line-speeds

    17. Potassium permanganate Ethysorb™ (StayFresh Ltd) Activated carbon/Pd catalyst Sendo-mate (Mitsubishi Chemical Corp) Activated carbon/bromine-based chemical Hato-fresh (Honshu paper) Disadvantages: Toxicity/migration Non-specific Not suitable for packaging films Ethylene scavengers - mechanisms

    18. Ethylene removing films • Everfresh™, Orega™, Profresh™, Peakfresh™ • PE based films containing activated clay

    19. CSIRO’s ESP technology • The only ethylene scavenging technology developed for packaging films • Specific • Colour change • Transparent colourless to pink transparent • Overcomes drawbacks of ethylene scavenging sachets

    20. Thermochromic Inks • Reversible and irreversible • Various temperature ranges • Limited colours • Combination with conventional ink can reveal messages

    21. Reversible ink for use on milk labels

    22. TTI’s • Provides irreversible evidence of a physical or physicochemical change, typically a colour or shade change • Function • Provide information on exceeding a temperature threshold or exceeding a cumulative time-temp history • To inform the supply chain and consumer that correct storage conditions have or have not been adhered to • Benefit • Provides reassurance to consumers • Real environment information rather than implied fitness (use/sell by date) • Highlights problems in supply chain • Can reduce shrinkage/wastage

    23. Freshness indicators • Provides irreversible evidence of a chemical or enzymatic change, typically a colour or shade change • Function • Provide information on actual degradation spoilage of products • To inform the supply chain and consumer of product freshness • Benefit • Provides reassurance to consumers • Real product information rather than implied fitness (use/sell by date) • Highlights problems in supply chain • Can reduce shrinkage/wastage

    24. Current applicationsFindus • Combined technology TTI and RF data tag • One product line monitored in Sweden from early 2003 using Bioett’s TTI • Device the size of a credit card • Cost 15 to 25 Euro Cents • Device records temperature change through supply chain which can be read by hand held scanner • Enzyme based reaction provides data and power source • Large Swedish dairy Skanemejerier are also using these devices

    25. Current ApplicationsLifelines (US) • US retailer Trader Joe require suppliers to apply LifeLines TTI’s to any fresh produce supplied to the company • Monoprix the low cost French retailer uses the labels on 175 of its private label chilled products • LifeLines sold over 200 million TTI’s in 2002 and project 25% pa growth

    26. Steamers • Steams food • Valve releases excess pressure

    27. Self-Heating/Cooling • Tempra • both heating and chilling technologies

    28. Self heating/Self cooling packaging

    29. Barrier Technologies • Improvements to O2/CO2 barrier • new resins or improved PET resins • coatings • multilayers - overmoulding or co-injection • inclusion of nanocomposites

    30. New Resins • Polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) • use on its own or as blend with PET • higher glass transition temperature • barrier improvements about 5x • cost increase • Polyglycolic acid (PGA) • O2 barrier 10x better than MXD6 • similar melting point to PET • FDA approval 2004?

    31. Transparent barrier coating - films • SiOx or AlOx • barrier similar to metallised films

    32. Transparent barrier coatings - bottles • External • no food contact issues • can be scratch resistant and friction of bottle can be improved • Internal • not easily damaged • protects drink from gases/chemicals in bottle wall • easier to incorporate PCR PET

    33. External coatings • Resin coatings from PPG/SIPA, Du Pont, Dow • SiOx - plasma - Krones / Coca Cola / Leybold

    34. Internal coatings • Diamond like coatings (carbon), plasma and acetylene • Nissei, Mitsubishi/Kirin, Sidel (ACTIS) • brownish colour • Silicon oxide • plasma Tetra Pak (Glaskin), SIG Schott HiCotec

    35. Multilayer • Co-injection of EVOH or MXD6 • Kortec, Owens Illinois, Pechiney • Active • Oxbar - MXD6 + cobalt catalyst • SurShield (Owens Illionois) • Dar Eval - O2 scavenger in EVOH layer

    36. Multilayer - active

    37. Multilayer • Active • Amosorb 3000 - transparent O2 scavenging copolyester • OSP (Chevron Phillips Chemical) - oxidisable polymer resin cyclohexenyl methyl acrylate + photoinitiator and catalyst

    38. Nanocomposites • Improved mechanical properties, eg strength to weight • Improved thermal stability and heat distortion temperature • Improved barrier properties • Better chemical resistance • Better transparency, appearance

    39. Nanocomposites • Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co + Nanocor • nanoclays combined with polymers • silicate clays, 100-1000 x 1nm, large surface area, high aspect ratio • nanocomposites retain flexibility, transparency of unfilled polymer • permeability greatly reduced 2-20x, filler levels 1-5% • improved barrier for film and PET bottles • first application ‘Imperm 105’ in films - still clear • second application ‘Imperm 107’ in bottles - currently hazy • potential cost reduction - fewer layers