ethical issues of elder care n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Ethical Issues of Elder Care PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Ethical Issues of Elder Care

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 20

Ethical Issues of Elder Care - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 517 Views
  • Uploaded on

Ethical Issues of Elder Care. Objectives. Apply the concept of decision-specific capacity to older adults. Apply legal and ethical principles in the analysis of complex issues related to care of older adults: informed consent, refusal of treatment, and advance directives

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Ethical Issues of Elder Care' - papina


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
objectives
Objectives
  • Apply the concept of decision-specific capacity to older adults.
  • Apply legal and ethical principles in the analysis of complex issues related to care of older adults: informed consent, refusal of treatment, and advance directives
  • Define ethics, bioethics, ethical dilemma, and nursing ethics.
objectives1
Objectives
  • Describe the major ethical principles that have an impact on older adults’ health care.
  • Discuss the difference between personal values and professional codes of ethics.
  • Apply a decision-making model to an ethical dilemma in nursing practice.
decision making capacity
Decision-making Capacity
  • Implies the ability to understand the nature and consequences of different options, make a choice among those options, and communicate that choice.
  • Clinicians assess decision-making capacity.
  • Required to give informed consent
  • May fluctuate over time from transient changes in ability to comprehend and communicate
decision making capacity1
Decision-making Capacity
  • Competency.Legal determination by a judge as to mental disability or incapacity; whether a person is legally fit and qualified to give testimony or execute legal documents.
  • The law presumes that all adults are competent and have decision-making capacity to make health care decisions.
decision making capacity2
Decision-making Capacity
  • Decision-specific capacity vs. global decisional capacity
  • May fluctuate over time
  • Cognitive impairment automatic incapacity
  • No “gold standard” for capacity determination
verification of decision making capacity
Verification of Decision-making Capacity
  • Required when a person is refusing or giving consent for treatment and/or executing an advance directive
    • Ability to voice a choice or preference
    • Adequate disclosure
    • Understanding of information: recall information; manipulate information; appreciate situation
  • Voluntary consent
  • Consistency
informed consent
Informed Consent
  • Can make a choice
  • Understand and appreciate the issues
  • Rationally manipulate information
  • Make a stable and coherent decision
  • Age-related factors:
    • Hearing and visual impairments
    • Impaired communication: written and verbal
    • Values and beliefs
    • Fluctuating or diminished decision-making capacity
refusal of treatment
Refusal of Treatment
  • The right to refuse treatment even if refusal hastens or results in their death.
  • Requisite capacity must be determined:
    • Can make a choice
    • Understand and appreciate the issues
    • Rationally manipulate information
    • Make a stable and coherent decision
advance directive ad
Advance Directive (AD)

Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA) mandates:

  • Provide all adult patients with written information concerning care decisions
  • Ask patients whether they have an AD
  • Maintain policies re: discussions of AD
  • Honor AD
  • Educate patients about AD
  • Conduct community education
  • Do not discriminate
advance directives
Advance Directives
  • Living Will
  • Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care (DPOAHC) or Health Care Proxy (HCP)
    • Guardian; conservator; proxy; health care agent
  • Advance Health Care Directive
ethics terminology
Ethics Terminology
  • Ethics: declarations of right or wrong and what out to be
  • Bioethics: application of ethics to matters of life and death
  • Ethical dilemma: a difficult problem seemingly incapable of a satisfactory solution; situation involving two equally unsatisfactory alternatives
  • Nursing ethics: application of ethical principles in nursing practice
major ethical principles
Major Ethical Principles
  • Autonomy
  • Justice
  • Beneficence
  • Nonmaleficence
  • Veracity
  • Substituted Judgment Standard
  • Best Interest Standard
ethical principles
Ethical Principles
  • Autonomy – right to self-determination, independence, and freedom.
  • Justice – obligation to fair to all people
  • Beneficence – duty to act for the benefit of others; “doing good” theory
ethical principles1
Ethical Principles
  • Nonmaleficence – do no harm; protect patient from harm if they cannot protect themselves
    • Patient abandonment
    • Personal relationships with patient
    • Impaired practice
  • Veracity – honest and trustworthy in dealing with people.
ethical principles2
Ethical Principles
  • Substituted Judgment Standard – surrogate decision-maker
  • Best Interest Standard – decision based on what health care providers and/or families decide is best for that person.
values and codes of ethics
Values and Codes of Ethics
  • Personal Values
  • Professional Values
  • Code of Ethics
ethical dilemmas decision making model
Ethical DilemmasDecision-making Model
  • Collect, analyze, and interpret the data
  • State the dilemma
  • Consider the choices of action
  • Analyze advantages and disadvantages of each course of action
  • Make the decision
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the decision
summary
Summary
  • Concept of decision-specific capacity
  • Verification of decision-making capacity
  • Informed consent
  • Refusal of treatment
  • Advance directives
  • Ethics, bioethics, ethical dilemmas, nursing ethics
  • Seven major ethical principles; decision-making model for ethical dilemmas