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2 nd Quarter Safety Training PowerPoint Presentation
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2 nd Quarter Safety Training

2 nd Quarter Safety Training

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2 nd Quarter Safety Training

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  1. Second Quarter Safety Training 2nd Quarter Safety Training

  2. Agenda • Safety Results • Pre-trip Inspection • Safe Working • Safety Pledge • Hands-on Pre-trip Inspection

  3. SAFETY RESULTS 2013 Safety Facts • End of year 2013: • 3,879 Full Time Drivers: • 4,133 FT and PT Drivers • 2,207 total accidents in 2013 • 1,037 preventable accidents in 2013 • 42 percent of drivers had an accident in 2013 • 20 percent of drivers had a preventable accident in 2013 • + ALL areas of accidents increased from 2012 to 2013 • Including preventable accidents, DOT preventable, and injuries • + Accident trends are proving to be higher in 2014 than they were in 2013. • + We need your help to slow down, follow Megasafe7 Rules, and to not put yourself or the motoring public at risk.

  4. SAFETY RESULTS DOT Preventable Accident Trends: 2011, 2012 and 2013 What happens in these types of accidents? People get hurt.

  5. SAFETY RESULTS Company Safety Results • We’re on an upward trend

  6. SAFETY RESULTS Company Safety Results • The number of preventable accidents is higher than ever before • In February, we had nearly 120 preventable accidents in 28 days • Quick math tells us we had fourpreventable accidents daily

  7. SAFETY RESULTS Company Safety Results • The number of fixed object strikes and backing accidents are on the rise • Each of these are preventable and avoidable accidents Safety starts with YOU, the professional driver. Be the person who stops the trend!

  8. All Ruan trucks +Serious accidents, DOT and preventable. Lives were impacted in each of these. Don’t let this happen to you. + How would you feel if you caused others to get hurt? +How would your family feel if they received that phone call and you were hurt or not coming home?

  9. + Don’t force it. Slow down. + You know your truck, you know your ability. + The decision is yours, you are the Captain of the Ship. The bottom line is, you do not want to put yourself, others, equipment, or other’s property at risk. If it can’t be done legally and safely, STOP, call the terminal and get them involved to help you.

  10. SAFETY RESULTS 2014 Terminal Safety Results ***INSERT YOUR TERMINAL INFORMATION FOR PREVENTABLE AND PREVENTABLE DOT

  11. SAFETY RESULTS 2014 Terminal Safety Results ***INSERT YOUR TERMINAL INFORMATION FOR PREVENTABLE AND PREVENTABLE DOT

  12. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Vehicle Inspections As a professional truck driver, you have a responsibility to yourself and the public. Before you begin your day, it is critical to conduct a thorough pre-trip inspection to ensure your vehicle is safe and ready for work. FMCSA Regulation: 392.7 Equipment, inspection and use. No commercial motor vehicle shall be driven unless the driver is satisfied that the following parts and accessories are in good working order, nor shall any driver fail to use or make use of such parts and accessories when and as needed: Service brakes, including trailer brake connections. Parking (hand) brake. Steering mechanism. Lighting devices and reflectors. Tires. Horn. Windshield wiper or wipers. Rear-vision mirror or mirrors. Coupling devices.

  13. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Why We Do Inspections • Safety – We want you to be safe, and safety is directly affected by your equipment • Economy – Getting the most out of our equipment • Legality – If an accident or inspection occurs, defects fall on not only the company, but also driver • Avoid Breakdowns – No one wants to sit on the side of the road

  14. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Vehicle Inspection Guide The Vehicle Inspection Guide is available to assist you. Contact your office staff for a guide.

  15. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step One Long Distance Check • As you approach your vehicle, look for obvious defects, such as: • Leaks • Damage • Flat tires

  16. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Two • Under Hood Check (before starting unit) • Look for loose, worn, broken or missing parts • Check levels: Engine oil, coolant, power steering fluid and windshield washer fluid • Check condition of: Belts, hoses and electrical wiring • Look for leaking fluid • Check the steering system and components • Check tires, wheels and lugs for proper inflation, damage, seal leaks, loose or missing lugs or cracks on wheel • Check brake hoses and shoes for chaffing or cracks

  17. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Three Lights • Turn on all lights. Including: • 4 ways • Dash lights • High-beam headlights • Marker lights • All lights must be in working order before trip

  18. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Four Driver Side Walk Around Check • Cab door: Mirror condition and clean • Fuel tank: Level, mounting, leaks and damage • Air hoses: No kinks or rubbing • Light cord: No chaffing or rubbing • Glad hands and socket: Proper attachment • 5th wheel handle: Locked position, no gap between plate and trailer • Tires, wheels and lugs: Proper inflation, damage, seal leaks, loose or missing lugs, cracks on wheel

  19. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Five Behind Tractor (under trailer) • 5th wheel jaw: Locked around shank of king pin • Turn signals: Flashing and clean • Mud flaps: Good condition, reflective tape • Leaf spring/air bags: No cracks or missing parts, proper inflation • Brakes: No holes, cracks, secured • Air lines/electrical wiring: Secured, not rubbing • Landing gear: Fully raised, handle secured • Reefer fuel: Level, tank mounting and leaks

  20. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Six Trailer Tandems • Tandem axle slider: Pins engaged • Air lines/electrical wiring: Secured, not rubbing • Leaf spring/air bags: No cracks or missing parts, proper inflation • Brakes: No holes, cracks, secured • Tires, wheels and lugs: Proper inflation, damage, seal leaks, loose or missing lugs, cracks on wheel • Reflector tape and lights: Clean, condition and operational • ABS warning light: Clean, marked ABS, operational

  21. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Seven Behind Trailer • Rear reflector tap and lights: Clean, condition and operational • Air lines/electrical wiring: Secured, not rubbing • Leaf spring/air bags: No cracks or missing parts/proper inflation • Brakes: No holes, cracks, secured • Mud flaps: In good condition and properly secured

  22. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Eight Passenger Side • Repeat steps four through six in reverse

  23. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Nine Cab Check • Interior lights: Properly functioning • Emergency equipment: Fire extinguisher, reflective triangles, extra fuses, accident kit with camera and emergency response guidebook if needed • Paperwork: Permit book, vehicle condition report book, correct bill of ladings • See next slide for complete cab-readiness list • Note: Then turn key switch to the “on” position and check warning systems before starting engine

  24. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS In-cab Readiness Details • Paper logbook: By law, even if a driver is running an electronic log, a paper log is required • Electronic logging book • Vehicle inspection book • Accident kit with camera • Permit book with current and necessary permits • Truck appearance is safe and free of clutter during both pre- and post-trip inspection

  25. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Nine Start Engine: Look • Air pressure between 120 and 130 psi • Charge indicator and oil pressure are normal • Windshield is clean, wipers and washer work, no cracks or chips that can turn into cracks • Mirror adjustment

  26. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Nine Start Engine: Listen • Unusual sounds: Shut down the engine if heard • Horns: Air and city

  27. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Nine Start Engine: Feel • Steering wheel free play: PS 45 degrees max • Heater, A/C and defroster • Seat belt • Door latch and side window condition • Check clutch free play: about 1 – 1 ½ inches

  28. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Nine Brake Check • Find level ground • Shut engine off and turn key to on position • Release parking brakes and listen to air leaks • Pump brakes down to 80-90 psi • Fully apply the service brake, holding the brake pedal. A continuous drop in air pressure is unsatisfactory (4 psi in one minute in combination vehicles) • Continue to pump brakes again • Low pressure warning systems come on by 55 psi • Tractor protection value pops out between 35-45 psi (30 psi is unsatisfactory)

  29. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection: Step Ten Certification of Inspection • If everything is found to be satisfactory and in good working order, sign the pre-trip portion of the Vehicle Condition Report • Telling the terminal manager or maintenance staff does not qualify as a write-up or certification

  30. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection Length • How long does a proper pre-trip inspection take to conduct? • There is no law stating how long a pre-trip inspection should to take: however, like everything else, log it as you do it • Based on the examples on the next slide, who did a proper pre-trip?

  31. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Who Conducted a Proper Pre-trip Inspection? 37 second pre-trip 20 minute pre-trip In the example on the left, the driver will have a hard time explaining how a 10-step pre-trip was completed in four minutes during an audit, to a DOT officer or in court. Log it as you do it.

  32. VEHICLE INSPECTIONS Pre-trip Inspection Video We will now watch a video detailing the 10-step pre-trip inspection.

  33. SAFE WORKING Company Lost-Time Injury Results

  34. SAFE WORKING • Terminal Lost-Time Injury Results ***INSERT LT (LOST TIME) TERMINAL INFORMATION

  35. SAFE WORKING January2014 Injuries January 2014 Injuries: • 43 total • 21 medical • 22 lost time Top LT Claim Causes: • 11 slip/trip/fall • 5 strain/exertion • 3 motor vehicle Accidents • 2 exposure • 1 struck by/struck against

  36. SAFE WORKING Don’t Let This Happen To You EXAMPLE 1: The driver was aware that the bottom rung of the ladder on his trailer was missing. The driver used the ladder anyway, and forgot the rung was missing on the way down. The driver came down hard on his heel. As a result, the driver was out of work for more than two months and now walks with a limp that was not present prior to the accident. This could have easily been prevented had the equipment been written up and the driver maintained the Ruan Safety Pledge.

  37. SAFE WORKING Don’t Let This Happen To You EXAMPLE 2: A driver was traveling too fast going into a curve, lost control, struck another passenger vehicle and rolled the truck. Our driver suffered multiple injuries, including severe head trauma. The driver had a lengthy hospital stay, followed by a transfer to a long-term care facility before finally being allowed to return home with nurse-assisted care.  The driver continues to suffer from major cognitive deficits.It is likely that the driver will require lifetime care, and the driver likely faces permanent issues preventing a return to any form of work, plus the negative impact on regular, daily life.  This was preventable by slowing down for curves and ramps. Do not become complacent, and do not let this happen to you.

  38. SAFE WORKING • Don’t Let This Happen To You What happens when you are injured and can’t work? • Family life: Can you play ball with the kids, go fishing or watch their sporting events? • Loss of income: Work comp benefits are paid at a reduced rate (66 percent is the norm, depending each state law) • Long-term effects: Physical and emotional, plus additional stress on the family • Pain, surgery, medications, injections and multiple doctor visits • Physical therapy and rehabilitation • Vocational rehabilitation (retraining for another career). Can the individual perform the same job again? Will they ever be able to return to work? • You and your family can’t afford for you to be hurt

  39. SAFE WORKING Megasafe5 Rules of Working Safely • We want you to not only drive safely, but work safely as well. So next quarter, we’ll introduce the Megasafe5 Rules of Working Safely: • Rule 1 Prepare To Be Safe • Rule 2 Protect Yourself • Rule 3 Stay Safe While In Motion • Rule 4 Know Your Working Limits • Rule 5 Communicate

  40. SAFETY PLEDGE Remember Your Pledge • The Ruan Safety Pledge was created to ensure all Ruan associates perform their job safely and are personally responsible for safety. • If you signed the Safety Pledge, it is your responsibility to abide by its seven principles—they are designed to keep you, your co-workers and the motoring public safe • You are the Captain of the Ship. The Safety Pledge empowers you to do the right thing • How can this apply to you? • If you can’t safely and legally do it - don’t do it • Speak out without fear if it’s not safe. We stand behind you • Conditions are too tight to maneuver at a customer without causing an accident…don’t do it. Call your terminal

  41. SAFETY PLEDGE

  42. Second Quarter Safety Training