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Lead Teacher Workshop 2. Purpose of this session is…. To consider how your school’s current approach to assessment supports teachers to make overall teacher judgements (OTJs). Continue to explore the mathematics behind the National Standards

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Presentation Transcript
purpose of this session is
Purpose of this session is…

To consider how your school’s current approach to assessment supports teachers to make overall teacher judgements (OTJs).

Continue to explore the mathematics behind the National Standards

Share and discuss examples of reporting to refect on current reporting systems.

slide3

Overview

  • What are the current issues?
  • Strand – Geometry and the Standards
  • Revising the Number Framwork
  • Making OTJ’s using evidence from a child in your school.
  • Morning Tea
  • Reporting principles
  • Share and discuss report templates
warm up
Warm Up

Space Zapper

(FIO Link Number Book 1, Page 8)

reflection on the implementation of national standards
Reflection on the Implementation of National Standards

How have you used the learning from the first lead teachers workshop? (if attended).

What are your current successes and challenges?

Put each of these onto separate postits.

slide6

Clarification of questions from our last session.

  • Why is there no ‘well above’ when there is ‘well below’?
  • The Ministry require the numbers of children at well below for funding reasons. Schools are welcome to use ‘well above’ if they wish.
  • Is there a separate progression for ELLs in Maths?
  • No. Maths is an academic language for all -however be reasonable!!!
  • Has the Expectation grid been finalised?
  • Yes - it is on the wiki now.
  • Are examples of plain language comments coming?
  • Term 3
engaging with the standards through a rich task
Engaging with the Standards through a rich task

Map Making (from the NZ Orienteering Manual)

Make a map using the objects in your bag.

Hide the ‘treasure’

Describe how to get your teddy bear to the treasure.

Write down the language you used.

Place yourself on the progressions.

slide9

NNE, NNW 175 degrees

SSE, SSW north

ENE WNW

ESE WSW

What’s the difference between a grid reference and a co-ordinate?

N, E, S, W

NE, SE, NW SW,

slide10

Engaging with other tasks, focusing on Level 1

  • Bears (Group Solutions)
  • Exemplar (from 2nd tier support)

How do these differ from the map making task?

slide11

What makes a rich mathematical task?

  • It must be accessible to everyone at the start.
  • It needs to allow further challenges and be extendible.
  • It should invite learners to make decisions.
  • It should involve learners in speculating, hypothesis making &
  • testing, proving & explaining, reflecting, interpreting.
  • It should not restrict learners from searching in other
  • directions.
  • It should promote discussion and communication.
  • It should encourage originality/invention.
  • It should encourage ‘what if’ and ‘what if not’ questions.
  • It should have an element of surprise.
  • It should be enjoyable.
  • Ahmed (1987)
an overall teacher judgement otj involves ref tki org nz overall teacher judgement
An Overall Teacher Judgement (OTJ) involves… Ref: tki.org.nz/Overall-teacher-judgement

drawing on and applying the evidencegathered up to a particular point in time in order to make an overall judgement about a student’s progress and achievement

Is this different to teachers continually adjusting their teaching to match learning needs based on what they notice? – If so, how?

assessment key messages page 12
Assessment Key Messages (page 12)
  • When assessing a student’s achievement and progress, the teacher needs tomake an overall teacher judgement (OTJ) about the student in relation to the whole standard (paragraph 1).
  • A strong understanding of Number is vital …..the expectations for Number are the most critical requirement for meeting a standard” (paragraph 5).
  • ..independently and most of the time (paragraph 4).
revisiting the number framework
Revisiting The Number Framework

Stage

Stage Description, e.g. Advanced Counting

the number framework
The Number Framework

Stages

1 2 3 4

Stage

5

Stage

6

Stage

7

Stage

8

One-to-One Counting

Counting From One on materials

Counting From One by imaging

Advanced Counting

Early Additive Part-Whole

Advanced Additive Part-Whole

Advanced Multiplicative

Part-Whole

Advanced Proportional

Part-Whole

slide18

Curriculum levels

Mathematics Standards

Numeracy Strategy Stages

Adult Numeracy Level

slide21

Stage 5, EA, Level 2

part whole using subtraction facts, e.g. 37-9 and simple connection between add/sub e.g.14-6=? solved using 7+7.

Place value with simple renaming,

e.g. 49 + 24 = , and 73 – 9

Multiplication using halving,e.g.14÷2=7 as 7+7 =14, doubling, and simple known facts e.g .2 x 6 = 12 so 3 x 6 = 18 (adding on),

What is the difference between ‘After 3 years at school’ and ‘By the end of Y4’?

part-whole using addition facts, e.g. 18 + 8

Place value units without renaming, e.g. 40 + 50 = 90,

and 87 – 30 = 57

Multiplication using addition facts, e.g. 8 + 8 as 2 x 8, 6 tens as 6 x 10 ,

slide22

Making a Best Fit

Overall Teacher Judgement (OTJ)

sources of evidence to support otj
Sources of evidence to support OTJ:

Observation of Process

Evidence gained from informal assessment opportunities:

Learning Conversations

Evidence arising from Learning Conversations:

  • Conferencing
  • Interviewing
  • Questioning
  • Explaining
  • Discussing

Overall Teacher Judgement

What is your initial assessment about where a child is at? Then use other evidence to defend/adjust your judgement.

Test Outcomes

Evidence gained from assessment tools, including standardised tools:

sources of evidence to support otj1
Sources of evidence to support OTJ:

Observation of Process

Evidence gained from informal assessment opportunities:

Learning Conversations

Evidence arising from Learning Conversations:

  • Classroom Observation
  • Student books and tasks
  • Running Records
  • Student peer assessment
  • Gloss and IKAN
  • Conferencing
  • Interviewing
  • Questioning
  • Explaining
  • Discussing

Overall Teacher Judgement

What is your initial assessment about where a child is at? Then use other evidence to defend/adjust your judgement.

Test Outcomes

Evidence gained from assessment tools, including standardised tools:

  • 6 year Observation Survey
  • PAT
  • Star
  • E-asTTle/AsTTle V4
  • GLoSS and IKAN
slide26
First

Make a “best fit” overall teacher judgment.

What is your ‘gut feel’ about that child then support it with evidence.

Second

Consider judgment in relation to student’s age or year level

Third

Identify next teaching and learning steps

slide28

Student A

So ifheis a Y6 student he is.. above, at, below, well below?

Strengths, weaknesses?

Next learning steps?

your turn
Your Turn!
  • Share samples of work/other evidence (informal and formal) about a child in your class.
  • All make independent judgements of that child (using the progressions to help).
  • Discuss and compare your judgements.
moderation of otjs
Moderation of OTJs

Why is this useful?

To get a shared understanding of:

  • what students should be able to do at each standard
  • what student work should look like at each standard
  • how formal assessment tools relate to the standards
  • consitency of OTJ’s
critical questions for schools
Critical Questions for schools.
  • What should these children’s next learning steps be, and what does that mean for my teaching?
  • Which children do we need to consider as a whole staff or syndicate?
slide35

I Spy

Deal out the cards in 4 rows of 8. The caller looks then says “I spy …..

the number before / after /in between…

a pair that make 10

two numbers that make…. 15)

two numbers with a difference of…

two numbers whose product is….etc.

The cards must be touching

vertically, horizontally or diagonally

reporting
Reporting

NAG 2A (a) report to students and their parents on the students’ progress and achievement in relation to National Standards. Reporting to parents in plain language in writing must be at least twice a year;

Reporting to the Board of Trustees:

Including in the school’s annual report the number of students at, above, below and well below the standard including Maori, Pasifika and gender

slide37
Questions from the Self Review Tool for Reporting

How do we ensure our reporting clearly describes students’ progress and achievement?

How do we ensure our students are able to contribute to reporting?

How do we develop effective partnerships with parents, families/whanau?

reporting to parents
Reporting to parents
  • Standards are written for ‘end of year’
  • Could report in relation to:
    • The standard the student meets (i.e. best fit)
    • The year level standard (above, at below well below) or
    • a scale the school is currently using.
  • Need to report to parents in writing twice a year.
  • The first report should be in relation to expected progress and achievement towards the end of year target. - If they have already met it - tell them so and what’s next?
principles for reporting
Principles for reporting
  • Involves the students
  • Supports learning and next steps
  • Language clear and easily understood
  • Honest and transparent
  • No surprises
  • Strengthens educational partnerships with students and whānau
what do parents want to know
What do parents want to know?
  • What their child can do and how they have progressed
  • Their child’s progress and achievement in relation to the standard for their year level
  • Their child’s goals
  • How they can help
tips for writing in plain language from reporting to parents on tki
Tips for writing in plain language (from Reporting to Parents on TKI)
  • Keep words, sentences and paragraphs short and simple. Bullet points work well for clarity.
  • Inform then show, e.g. a piece of maths work.
  • Encourage student comments.
  • Leave out anything that is not relevant.
  • Use a summary sentence to get to the point first, then explain in more detail.
  • Use language that is familiar and easy to understand.
  • When explaining a learning process, use actual examples where practical.
  • Avoid jargon where possible. If absolutely necessary explain what it means every time.
  • Be personal: use ‘I’, ‘my’, ‘their’, ‘her/he’, ‘you’.
  • For assessment results – give clear final results
planning time
Planning Time
  • What questions have been clarified?
  • What will you take away to use with your staff.
thought for the day
Thought for the day

If you always do what you’ve always done -

you’ll always get what you’ve always got.

thought for the day1
Thought for the day

Remember that frequently…..

The student knows more than the teacher about what he has learned even though he knows less about what he was taught.

Just because you’ve taught it doesn’t mean they’ve learned it