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CS 791m Human-Computer Interaction

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  1. CS 791mHuman-Computer Interaction Fall 2003 Course Syllabus [Preliminary] August 25, 2003

  2. Outline • The Instructor • The Students • The Course • The Texts • Initial WWW Pointers • Grading Scheme • Policies • Tentative Schedule

  3. The Instructor. • Sergiu Dascalu • Room SEM-236 • Telephone 784-4613 • E-mail dascalus@cs.unr.edu • Web-sitewww.cs.unr.edu/~dascalus • Office hours: • Tuesday and Thursday 1:00 – 2:30 pm or by appointment or chance

  4. .The Instructor • Sergiu Dascalu • PhD, Dalhousie U., Halifax, NS, Canada, 2001 • Teaching and research at Dalhousie University, 1993-2001 (software engineering focus) • Teaching and research at the University Politehnica Bucharest, Romania, 1984-1995 (RT embedded systems focus) • Consultant for software development companies in Canada and Romania

  5. The Students Registered as of yesterday: 9students Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval

  6. The Course • Classroom: OSN-202 (building 21 on UNR map); 6:00 pm-7:15 pm • Outline [tentative]:This course examines topics related to designing computer systems that support people to carry on their activities productively and safely. Possible topics covered include input-output devices, input-output channels, interaction styles, usability principles and paradigms, task analysis, dialog notations and semantics, screen design, implementation support, multimedia, interfaces for web-sites, and virtual reality.

  7. The Texts. • Textbook: ONE of, most likely, the following: Alan Dix et al's "Human-Computer Interaction“ or Ellen Isaacs and Alan Walendowski's "Designing from Both Sides of the Screen“ or Jenny Preece et al's "Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction"

  8. .The Texts • Lecture notes: • Presentations by the instructor • Notes you take in the classroom • Additional texts (see pages 16 and 17) • Material that will be indicate dlater by the instructor (papers, articles, tutorials, etc).

  9. Initial WWW Pointer • Gary Perlman’s HCI Bibliography: http://hcibib.org/ • More will be indicated later

  10. Grading Scheme. • Tentative (slight modifications are possible): • Assigned reading/assignments 20% • Presentation 12% • Midterm tests 30% • Project 28% • Class participation 10% • TOTAL 100% • Note that there are no make-up tests or homework in this course

  11. .Grading Scheme • Passing conditions (all must be met): • 50% overall & • 50% in tests & • 50% in project & • 50% in assigned readings, assignments, presentation, and class participation

  12. Grading Scale • Numerical-letter grade correspondence • A 90 -100 [maximum 100] • A- 86 - 89 • B+ 83 - 85 • B 77 - 82 • B- 73 - 76 • C+ 70 - 72 • C 64 - 69 • C- 61 - 63 • D+ 58 - 60 • D 54 - 57 • D- 50 - 53 • F < 50

  13. Policies.. • Late submission policy: • Maximum 2 late days per assignment/project deliverable • Each late day penalized with 10% • No subdivision of late days • No late days for presentation and tests • Example: a 90/100 worth assignment gets 81/100 if one day late (90*0.9 = 81) or 72/100 if two days late (90*0.8 = 72)

  14. .Policies. • Legal notices on the world-wide web: Read and comply with accompanying legal notices of downloadable material • Specify references used • Do not plagiarize (see next slide)

  15. ..Policies • Plagiarism and cheating: Will not be tolerated. Please read the policies of University of Nevada, Reno regarding academic dishonesty: www.unr.edu/stsv/acdispol.html

  16. Additional Texts.. • Each student will deliver a presentation based on one of the following additional texts 1 Don. A Norman, The Design Of Everyday Things 2 Steven Krug, Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability 3 Alan Cooper & Robert Reimann, About Face 2.0: The Essential of Interaction Design 4 Alan Cooper, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity

  17. .Additional Texts. 5 Carolyn Snyder, Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Refine User Interfaces 6 B.J. Fogg, Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think We Do 7 Jef Raskin, The Humane Interface: New Directions for Designing Interactive Systems 8 Ellen Isaacs & Alan Walendowski, Designing from Both Sides of the Screen: How Designers and Engineers Can Collaborate to Build Cooperative Technology 9 Jeff Johnson, GUI Bloopers: Don’ts and Do’s for Software Developers and Web Designers

  18. ..Additional Texts 10 Karen Donahue, Built for Use: Driving Profitability Through the User Experience 11 Joel Spolsky, User-Interface Design for Programmers 12 Chris Crawford, The Art of Interactive Design: A Euphonious and Illuminating Guide to Building Successful Software 13 Eric Begnan (editor), Information Appliances and Beyond

  19. Tentative Schedule.

  20. .Tentative Schedule