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Quality Teaching and Learning. Nancy Frey, PhD www.fisherandfrey.com Click on “Resources”. Guided. Focus Lessons. Independent. Purposeful Teaching. Collaborative. The helping curriculum. Early Predictors for Passing (or Failing) the CAHSEE. Grade Point Average Absences

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quality teaching and learning

Quality Teaching and Learning

Nancy Frey, PhD www.fisherandfrey.com Click on “Resources”

slide2

Guided

Focus Lessons

Independent

Purposeful Teaching

Collaborative

slide3

The helping

curriculum

early predictors for passing or failing the cahsee
Early Predictors for Passing (or Failing) the CAHSEE
  • Grade Point Average
  • Absences
  • Classroom Behavior

These are present as early as fourth grade

Zau, A. C., & Betts, J. R. (2008). Predicting success, preventing failure: An investigation of the California High School Exit Exam. Sacramento, CA: Public Policy Institute of California.

slide7

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.3

0.7

0.2

Medium

0.8

0.1

High

0.9

Low

0.0

1.0

Teacher effects

1.1

-0.1

Developmental effects

Negative

1.2

-0.2

Zone of desired effects

Reverse effects

Retention: d = - 0.16

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement.

New York: Routledge.

slide8

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.3

0.7

0.2

Medium

0.8

0.1

High

0.9

Low

0.0

1.0

Teacher effects

1.1

-0.1

Developmental effects

Negative

1.2

-0.2

Zone of desired effects

Reverse effects

Ability Grouping: d = .12

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement.

New York: Routledge.

slide9

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.3

0.7

0.2

Medium

0.8

0.1

High

0.9

Low

0.0

1.0

Teacher effects

1.1

-0.1

Developmental effects

Negative

1.2

-0.2

Zone of desired effects

Reverse effects

Homework: d = .29

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement.

New York: Routledge.

slide11

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.3

0.7

0.2

Medium

0.8

0.1

High

0.9

Low

0.0

1.0

Teacher effects

1.1

-0.1

Developmental effects

Negative

1.2

-0.2

Zone of desired effects

Reverse effects

Small group learning: d = 0.49

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement.

New York: Routledge.

slide12

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.3

0.7

0.2

Medium

0.8

0.1

High

0.9

Low

0.0

1.0

Teacher effects

1.1

-0.1

Developmental effects

Negative

1.2

-0.2

Zone of desired effects

Reverse effects

Meta-cognitive Strategies: d = 0.69

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement.

New York: Routledge.

slide13

0.5

0.4

0.6

0.3

0.7

0.2

Medium

0.8

0.1

High

0.9

Low

0.0

1.0

Teacher effects

1.1

-0.1

Developmental effects

Negative

1.2

-0.2

Zone of desired effects

Reverse effects

Reciprocal Teaching: d = 0.74

Hattie, J. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses related to achievement.

New York: Routledge.

slide14

Finding

Using

Producing

Sharing

information

Literacy in the 21st Century

slide15

Skill is the

ability to apply

concepts

when not

prompted

to do so.

slide16

How can we move

from PD

to classroom practice?

slide17

How can we move

from PD

to classroom practice?

How can we utilize

teacher-mentors,

coaches, and administrators

to support implementation?

slide18

How can we agree on

quality across the district?

slide22

Increase

instructional

consistency.

slide23

Teach for

interaction

with you and

the content.

slide26

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

Guided Instruction

“We do it”

“You do it

together”

Collaborative

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

A Model for Success for All Students

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

the sudden release of responsibility
The sudden release of responsibility

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

diy school
DIY School

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

(none)

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual

release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

the good enough classroom
The “Good Enough” Classroom

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

Guided Instruction

“We do it”

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual

release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

slide30

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

“I do it”

Focus Lesson

Guided Instruction

“We do it”

“You do it

together”

Collaborative

“You do it

alone”

Independent

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

A Model for Success for All Students

Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2008). Better learning through structured teaching: A framework for the gradual release of responsibility. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

slide31

How does Arlen:

  • Establish purpose?
  • Model his thinking?
  • Demonstrate?
  • Utilize productive group work?
  • Provide guided instruction?
  • Check for understanding?
  • Foster metacognition?
slide33

How does Arlen:

  • Establish purpose?
  • Model his thinking?
  • Demonstrate?
  • Utilize productive group work?
  • Provide guided instruction?
  • Check for understanding?
  • Foster metacognition?
district demographics
District Demographics
  • 27,000 students in 44 schools
  • 65% of the students are Latino/Hispanic, 16% are Asian/Pacific Islander, 14% are white, and 5% are African-American
  • 72% English learners
  • 1999, 37% of students were proficient in reading
  • One school > 800 Academic Performance Index
instructional model
Instructional Model
  • Professional development on implementing Gradual Release of Responsibility Model since 2005
  • Administrator trainings using learning walks
  • Development of quality indicators
  • Development of language frames
  • Coaching, coaching, coaching…
outcomes
Outcomes
  • District API > 800 (833 in 2009)
  • 32 schools with API > 800 (of 44)
  • Met 41 of 41 AYP indicators (2009)
  • Only three schools remain in PI, two of which made AYP in 2008
  • 73% of the schools made growth targets for English learners (up from 21% in 2004)
  • 60.5% of the students reached proficiency
slide39

Feed Up

Establishing Purpose:

Why are we

doing this anyway?

slide40

TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY

Focus Lesson

Establish purpose

Model and think aloud

Provide direct explanation

slide41

Two Components:

Language Purpose

Content Purpose

what is a content purpose
What is a content purpose?
  • An analysis of the content standard
  • Focuses on what can be accomplished toward the grade-level standard TODAY (in other words, it’s not the standard)
  • Is a learning goal, not an activity (can be written as a goal or objective)
what is a language purpose
What is a language purpose?
  • An analysis of the language demands of the task
  • An understanding of the way students demonstrate their thinking through spoken or written language
slide44

“Here’s what you’re going

to learn today, and this is

what I want you to do with it.”

the power of modeling
The Power of Modeling

Mirror neuron systems