slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Bristlecones (Pinus longaeva & Pinus aristata) Grow atop the arid mountains of the Great Basin, from Colorado to Ca PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Bristlecones (Pinus longaeva & Pinus aristata) Grow atop the arid mountains of the Great Basin, from Colorado to Ca

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 129

Bristlecones (Pinus longaeva & Pinus aristata) Grow atop the arid mountains of the Great Basin, from Colorado to Ca - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 378 Views
  • Uploaded on

Bristlecones (Pinus longaeva & Pinus aristata) Grow atop the arid mountains of the Great Basin, from Colorado to California http://www.photo.net/ca/sierra EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE : Data Source TUESDAY - January 28, 2003 … 15.00 – 15.30 Internet surfing  15.30 – 17.15 We b xercises

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Bristlecones (Pinus longaeva & Pinus aristata) Grow atop the arid mountains of the Great Basin, from Colorado to Ca' - ostinmannual


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Bristlecones (Pinus longaeva & Pinus aristata)

Grow atop the arid mountains of the Great Basin, from Colorado to California

http://www.photo.net/ca/sierra

evidence based medicine data source
EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE : Data Source

TUESDAY - January 28, 2003

15.00 – 15.30 Internet surfing 

15.30 – 17.15 Webxercises

17.15 – 17.45 General discussion with prize

17.45 – 18.30 Teacher's state of the art lecture: What do you find on the net ?

slide3

European Academy for Medicine of AgeingIKB Foundation, Sion, SwitzerlandWhat do you find on the net ?F. R. Herrmann, MD, MPH

slide4
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History (hardware & internet) 2
  • What info for who?3
  • Web site design 4
  • Quality of content 5
  • Usage 6
  • THM & Perspectives 7
definition
Definition

The Net is an example of a non-teleological(no specific purpose), self-organizing system that combines human and machine communication, reasoning, and associative capabilities.

The History of the Net. Master's Thesis. School of Communications. Grand Valley State University. Allendale, MI; 1994

http://www.ocean.ic.net/ftp/doc/nethist.html

www world wide web the web
WWW = World Wide Web = The Web

A « boundless » information space

populated by a collection of data objectslinked via a communication protocol

LOWE HL et al. The World Wide Web : A review of an emerging Internet-based Technology for the Distribution of biomedical information. JAMIA 3(1) 1996;1-14.

last part of a domain name in the united states
Last Part of a Domain nameIn the United States

GOV Government affiliated organizationMIL Military

EDU Schools, Universities, HospitalsCOM Commercial organizationsNET Gateway computersORG Ill defined organizations

slide9
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History (hardware & internet)
  • What info for who? 3
  • Web site design 4
  • Quality of content 5
  • Usage 6
  • THM & Perspectives 7
slide10

Sebastian M. Cosmographiae Universalis.

Basel; 1550:338-339.

http://historic-cities.huji.ac.il/central_europe/central_europe.html

history
History

-3000Chinese abacus 100Roman abacus

http://www.soroban.com/museum/index_eng.html

history12
History

Leonardo da Vinci 1452-1519

~1500 First drawing of a mechanical calculator

http://www.maxmon.com/1500ad.htm

history13
History

Wilhelm Schickard 1592 - 1635 D

  • First calculator to speed Kepler’s

astronomicalcomputation

Blaise Pascal1623 - 1662 F

1642Pascaline

To simplytaxes processing

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/PictDisplay/Schickard.html

http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/

http://www.maxmon.com/1640ad.htm

history14
History

Joseph-Marie Jacquard1752-1834 F

1800 invent the loom programmed trough punched cardboard

Regularityof silk weaving

Design with more than 8 colors

Job made easier

history15
History

Charles Babbage 1791-1871 UK

1823 Difference Engine through funding from the British Government for calculating and printing mathematical tables by machine

1827 published a table of logarithms from 1 to 108000

1833began work on the Analytical Engine

Precision of numeric tables

http://ei.cs.vt.edu/~history/Zuse.html

history17
History

Herman Hollerith1860-1929USA

1880 Punch cards

1890 U.S. census

1896 Tabulating Machine Co…

1924 ...International Business Machine

Efficiency

Cense faster and less expensive

http://www.history.rochester.edu/steam/hollerith/

http://www.oz.net/~markhow/writing/holl.htm

history19
History

1907 Lee de Forest 1873-1961 USA

audion = "triode" = "bulb"

history20
History

Alan Turing1912 -1954 UK

1936Concepts of Universal Turing Machine, to solve all algorimical questions

1939Bombe, firstelectromecanical device to decypherencoded messages through the German Enigma

1950« Computing Machinery andIntelligence » in the journal Mind

history21
History

Konrad Zuse 1910 -1995 D

1935 First idea to construct a "mechanical brain »

1937 Elementary operation is: "Check of two binary digits for equality. Result is a variable with two values, which is once more a binary digit."

1938Z1 : fully mechanical programmable digital computer (test model).

1940 Z2 : first fully functioning electro-mechanical computer of the world.

http://ei.cs.vt.edu/~history/Zuse.html

slide22

The Z1 computer in the living room of Konrad Zuse's parents in 1936 http://www.epemag.com/zuse/Images/fig7b.jpg

history23
History

Konrad Zuse 1910-1995 Germany

1941 Z3. First realization of a program control using the binary digits.

1943 Henschel Aircraft Factory : first process control systemfor measuring the wings of airplanes

1945 Z4 Plankalkül(plan calculus), first programming language, a predecessor of the modern algorithmic programming languages

1950 Z4 used at ETH

history24
History

1945: John von Neumann wrote "First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC" in which he outlined the architecture of a stored-program computer.

Vernon Bush envision Hypertext "As we may think”

1946: ENIAC completed

1947:Transistor : W. Schokley, W Brattain, J. Bardeen. Bell Tel. Lab.

http://www.computerhistory.org/timeline/

history27
History

1958: Integratedcircuit by Jack Kilby(TI)

1961: UNIMATE, first industrial robot

1962: P. Baranconceive Internet (Rand Corp)

1963: D.C. Engelbartdescribe Hypertext

1964: P. Baranwrites a proposal in response to the U.S Government’s need for a decentralized communications networkin the event of a nuclear holocaust.

http://www.ti.com/corp/docs/kilbyctr

http://www.isoc.org/internet-history/brief.html

http://www.isoc.org/guest/zakon/Internet/History/HIT.html

how it works 1964 paul baran s specifications
How it works : 1964 Paul Baran’s specifications
  • The communication network will have:
    • No central authority
    • Ability to work under the worst possible conditions
    • Ability to assume that it is unreliable at all times
    • Ability to transcend it's own unreliability
    • All nodes in network equal in status, having the ability to originate, pass and receive messages
    • Messages divided into discrete packets of data
    • No priority on routing of packets
history31
History

1965T.H. Nelson define Hypertext

1967 First Electronic Handheld Calculator

First internal pacemaker (Medtronics)

http://www.isoc.org/internet-history/brief.html

http://www.ti.com/corp/docs/kilbyctr

history32
History

1968Realization of Arpanet (Advanced Research Project Agency Network)

1970TCP/IP (Transmission ControlProtocol / Internet Protocol)

1971 First Microprocessor (Intel)

1977 Apple II

1981 IBM PC

1989 Tim Berners-LeeWorld Wide Web

history34
History

1990ARPANET is deactivated

ARCHIE - First Internet search engine to catalogue software programs located at FTP sites on the Internet.

1991GOPHER-Created to catalogue the vast quantities of rawinformation on the Internet into a menu type format.

history35
History

1992WWW- created for high energy physics researchers to share information.Over 1M computers connected to theinternet.

1993First browser "MOSAIC" becomes all purpose internet tool for web and Usenet group browsing, and E-mail.

US Whitehouse, United Nations and World Bank join the Internet community.

Bill Clinton first president to receive E-mail at president@whitehouse.gov.

Commercial exclusion lifted on Internet

slide36

History

1994 First business starts taking orders online.

Law Firm spans the internet with E-mail advertising

1995 Netscape Navigator become most popular WWW browser.

The Internet becomes a commercial success.

Technologies of the Year: WWW, Search engines

Emerging Technologies: Mobile code (JAVA, JAVAscript),

1996 INTERNIC creates new IP addressing format to accomodate shortage of IP addresses. HTML 3.0

Hacks of the Year: US Dept of Justice, CIA, Air Force, UK Labour Party, NASA - US Air Force

Technologies of the Year: Search engines, JAVA, Internet Phone

Emerging Technologies: Virtual environments (VRML), Collaborative tools, Internet appliance (NC)

1997 First Swiss banks propose telebanking

Technologies of the Year: Push, MulticastingEmerging Technologies: Push, Streaming Media

history 1998
History 1998

Top 10 Domains by Host #: com, net, edu, mil, jp, us, uk ,de, ca, au

Hacks of the Year:

US Dept of Commerce (20 Feb),

New York Times (13 Sep)

China Society for Human Rights Studies (26 Oct),

UNICEF (7 Jan)

Technologies of the Year: E-Commerce, E-Auctions, PortalsEmerging Technologies: E-Trade, XML, Intrusion Detection

http://www.isoc.org/guest/zakon/Internet/History/HIT.html#Sources

history 1999
History 1999

The first full-service bank available only on the Net, opens for business.

Hacks of the Year: Star Wars, US Senate, Paraguay Gov't, Microsoft (26 Oct), UK Railtrack (31 Dec)

Technologies of the Year: E-Trade, Online Banking, MP3

Emerging Technologies: Net-Cell Phones, Thin Computing, Embedded Computing

Viruses of the Year: Mellisa (March), Explore (June)

http://www.isoc.org/guest/zakon/Internet/History/HIT.html#Sources

history 2000
History 2000
    • Massive denial of service attack launched against major web sites, including Yahoo, Amazon, and eBay (February)
    • Web size estimates by NEC-RI and Inktomi surpass 1 billion indexable pages
    • The European Commission contracts with a consortium of 30 national research networks for the development of Géant, Europe's new gigabit research network meant to enhance the current capability provided by TEN-155 (6 Nov)
  • Technologies of the Year: ASP, Napster
  • Emerging Technologies: Wireless devices, IPv6
  • Virus of the Year:Love letter (May)
  • Lawsuits of the Year : Napster, DeCSS
  • http://www.isoc.org/guest/zakon/Internet/History/HIT.html#Sources
history 2001
History 2001
    • First live distributed musical The Technophobe & The Madman -- over Internet2 networks debuts on 20 Feb European Council finalizes an international cybercrime treaty on 22 June and adopts it on 9 November. This is the first treaty addressing criminal offenses committed over the Internet.
    • Afghanistan's Taliban bans Internet access country-wide, including from Government offices, in an attempt to control content (13 Jul)
    • Viruses of the Year:Code Red (Jul), Nimda (Sep), SirCam (Jul), BadTrans (Apr, Nov) E
    • Emerging Technologies: Grid Computing, P2P
  • http://www.isoc.org/guest/zakon/Internet/History/HIT.html#Sources
growth of internet hosts
Growth of Internet hosts

http://www.zakon.org/robert/internet/timeline/ - Growth

Data from M. Lottor / Network Wizards on http://www.nw.com

evidence based medicine data source42
EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE : Data Source

TUESDAY - January 28, 2003

15.00 – 15.30 Internet surfing 

15.30 – 17.15 Webxercises

17.15 – 17.45 General discussion with prize

17.45 – 18.30 Teacher's state of the art lecture: What do you find on the net ?

hands on exercises of web searches
Hands on exercises of Web searches

« Webvidence » based medicine:

Try to find answers to queries thanks to the Web

Password for questions: webeama

evidence based medicine data source44
EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE : Data Source

TUESDAY - January 28, 2003

15.00 – 15.30 Internet surfing 

15.30 – 17.15 Webxercises

17.15 – 17.45 General discussion with prize

17.45 – 18.30 Teacher's state of the art lecture: What do you find on the net ?

hands on exercises of web searches45
Hands on exercises of Web searches

« Webvidence » based medicine:

Try to find answers to queries thanks to the Web

Password for questions: webeama

slide46
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History (hardware & internet) 2
  • What info for who?
  • Web site design 4
  • Quality of content 5
  • Usage 6
  • THM & Perspectives 7
scientist researcher
Scientist / Researcher
  • Databases access
    • genetics (ex)
    • biochemical
    • scientific pictures
    • literature searches & impact factors
    • classifications
  • Grants information
  • On-line Publication
  • Meeting organization (ex)
medline nlm the u s national library of medicine
Medline & NLMThe U.S. National library of medicine

« The wealth of new medical information issuing from research centers around the world cannot be used to improve our health and cure disease unless it is made available rapidly to the entire health science community. »

Donald A. B. Lindberg, M.D.

Director of the NLM

browsing the literature and searching for the right article
Browsing the literature and searching for the right article

Most of medical current literature searches programs are based on the Medline

database.

papers about internet and a ged in medline
Papers about Internet and agedin Medline

Zelingher J. Medicine on the Internet, summer 96. Editorial. MD Computing 1996 13(4) 295-7

clinicians
Clinicians
  • Databases access
    • literature searches
    • drug information
    • Cochran
  • Online journals
  • Professional information
  • Public Health information
  • Congress registration
clinicians64
Clinicians
  • Faster communications between hospitals labs and GP
  • Continuous Medical Education
  • Telemedicine
is nasalflu an intranasal influenza vaccine safe
Is Nasalflu (an intranasal influenza vaccine) safe?

Medline

Key words Hits

Nasalflu 2

Intranasal influenza vaccine 442

Intranasal influenza vaccine & YEAR =2002 25

Intranasal influenza vaccine & YEAR =2001 46

Intranasal influenza vaccine & Safety 50

is nasalflu an intranasal influenza vaccine safe66
Is Nasalflu (an intranasal influenza vaccine) safe?

Glueck R. Intranasal immunization against influenza. J Aerosol Med 2002; 15:221-8.

Glueck R. Review of intranasal influenza vaccine. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 2001; 51:203-11.

.

“Out of four serious adverse events seen during the clinical development, only one was thought to be remotely related to the test vaccine.Nasalflu, developed by the Swiss Serum and Vaccine Institute, is a novel, highly immunogenic and safe influenza subunit vaccine which is easily administered as a nasal spray.”

is nasalflu an intranasal influenza vaccine safe67
Is Nasalflu (an intranasal influenza vaccine) safe?

http://www.bernabiotech.com/news/archive/article/20010914_01.html

Berna Biotech AG decides not to market Nasalflu during the current flu season. Scientific investigations to clarify the situation. Bern, 14 September 2001

The market leader in the Swiss flu vaccine business, Berna Biotech AG, has decided not to sell its nasal flu vaccine Nasalflu until the situation has been completely clarified regarding a possible connection between Nasalflu and temporary facial paralysis (facialis parese). This clarification includes a case control study of the Swiss market last winter. In addition, a large-scale clinical study of the tolerability of Nasalflu is to be conducted in several European countries.

is nasalflu an intranasal influenza vaccine safe68
Is Nasalflu (an intranasal influenza vaccine) safe?

http://www.bernabiotech.com/news/archive/article/20020606_01.html

Berne, June 6, 2002

Clinical investigation of the association between Nasalflu and Bell's palsy discontinued after preliminary data fail to exclude a possible association. Berna Biotech to accelerate development of a 2nd generation nasal flu vaccine product

g eriatric student
(Geriatric) student
  • Universities
  • Teaching hospitals
  • Learning programs
  • Multimedia case management
classical vectors of medical teaching
Classical vectors of medical teaching
  • Reading

(textbooks, medical journal, case reports)

  • Lectures (conferences, tutorials, seminars)
  • Hands-on experiments

(physiology, microbiology, biochemistry...)

  • Clinical rounds
  • Bed-side teaching
  • Case based learning
computers provide
Computers provide
  • Databases
  • Search engines
  • Expert system
  • Case base learning
  • Simulators
slide72
WWW

Bring all of the above plus :

  • Hypertexted multimedia
    • Text, Picture, Sound, Animation, Movie
  • Real time Updates
  • Interactivity
web specific teaching tools
Web-specific teaching tools
  • On-line electronics journals
  • Pictures' library
  • Virtual hospitals
  • Self-learning modules
  • Teleteaching (CME)
e lderly citizen
(Elderly) citizen
  • Patients groups and societies
  • Health care providers
  • Telemedicine
  • Nursing homes
  • Hospitals
  • News
  • Banking
  • Advertising / shopping
  • State administration
c itizen
Citizen
  • Patients groups and societies
  • Health care providers
  • Nursing homes / Hospitals
  • News
  • Banking
  • Advertising / shopping / gaming
  • State administration
  • Communications (phone, webcam teleconference)
slide76

An Elderly Couple1510-28Oil on vellum(?) mounted on wood, 46 x 67 cmNational Gallery, London

By Jan GOSSAERT (called Mabuse)

http://www.kfki.hu/~arthp/html/g/gossaert/2/

qualitician
Qualitician
  • Databases access
    • Drugs
    • Sentinel events
  • Quality related institutions / services
i nstitution
Institution
  • Provide information to
    • patients
    • visitors
    • research volunteers
    • future employee
  • Communicate data on quality management
    • Statistics
    • Actions taken
slide79
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History (hardware & internet) 2
  • What info for who? 3
  • Web site design
  • Quality of content 5
  • Usage 6
  • THM & Perspectives 7
slide80

Nielsen J. "Top ten mistakes" in web design revisited three years later (1999).

  • Using frames
  • Gratuitous use of bleeding edge technology
  • Scrolling text, marquees, and constantly running animations
  • Complex URLs
  • Orphan pages
  • Long scrolling pages
  • Lack of navigation support
  • Non­standard link colours
  • Outdated information
  • Long download times

Purcell GP et al. BMJ 2002; 324: 557-8.

www.useit.com/alertbox/990502.html

slide81
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History 2
  • What info for who? 3
  • Web site design 4
  • Quality of content
  • Usage 6
  • THM & Perspectives 7

http://bmj.com/content/vol324/issue7337/cover.shtml

quality of healthcare information on the net who is hon

Quality of Healthcare Information On the Net: Who is HON?

François Herrmann, Celia Boyer, Melanie Provost

European Forum on Population Ageing Research

Workshop on Technology Advances - E-Health And E-Care.

WHO regional Copenhagen, Denmark - 24th October 2002

October 24th, 2002

hon s mission

Search guide

HON code of Conduct

HON’s services

World-Wide online Reliable Advice to Patients and INdividuals

HON’s mission
  • to guide healthcare consumers and providers on the World Wide Web to sound, reliable medical information and expertise
  • to contribute to better, more accessible and cost-effective health care

HON’s research studies

honcode to improve the quality of medical and health web sites
HONcode: to improve the quality of medical and health Web sites

Pioneer since 1996

Concise code of conduct:

8 principles

In 21 languages

  • 3300+ sites accredited
  • From the most important to smallest organisation
    • MEDLINEplus
    • Cancer Information Service (CIS) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)
    • Healthfinder.gov
    • InteliHealth

Accreditation system

Valid methodology

- In service since 1997

- Formal application process

- Manual verification process

- Active verification process

- 5 to 10 requests per day

- Monitoring

slide86

Health On the NetCode of Conduct principles

.

Principle 1:Authority

To be given by medically/health trained and qualified professionals.

Principle 2:Complementarity

The information provided is designed to support, not to replace.

Principle 3:Confidentiality

Confidentiality of data relating to individual patients and visitors.

health on the net code of conduct principles
Health On the NetCode of Conduct principles

.

Principle 4:Attribution

To be supported by clear references to source data

Principle 5:Justifiability

Any claims relating to the benefits/performance of a specific treatment will be supported by appropriate evidence in the manner outlined in Principle 4.

health on the net code of conduct principles88
Health On the NetCode of Conduct principles

.

Principle 6:Transparency of authorship

To provide information in the clearest possible manner and provide contact addresses for visitors.

Principle 7:Transparency of sponsorship

Support for this website will be clearly identified, including commercial and non-commercial organisations.

Principle 8:Honesty in advertising & editorial policy

The advertising policy adopted by the website owners will be displayed on the site.

honcode compliant site geriatrics

Web site Personalised Identification number

After revision by the HON

team the site status demonstrates

compliance with the HONcode.

We subscribe to the HONcode principles

HONcode Compliant site - Geriatrics
improve literacy access to quality information wrapin
Improve literacy & access to quality information:WRAPIN

With a more efficient sharing of reliable and trustworthy knowledge, WRAPIN will help the citizen/individual to make appropriate judgments on medical information

  • Two mains directions:
    • the efficient and intelligent search of information
    • the assertion of content trustworthiness

World-Wide online Reliable Advice to Patients and Individuals

EU project: IST-2001-33260 – Two years

european commission to publish a code of practice for websites
European Commission to publish a code of practice for websites

European Commission to publish a code of practice for websites Rory Watson, Brussels AMIA email news 01. 2003

  • Transparency and honesty - by providing full details of the provider of the site, its objective (including any commercial considerations),target audience, and sources of funding
  • Authority - by sourcing and dating all information displayed and providing full credentials of individuals and institutions
european commission to publish a code of practice for websites93
European Commission to publish a code of practice for websites
  • Privacy and confidentiality - with the requirement for an opt-in of any personal data
  • Currency - by regularly updating the site's contents
  • Accountability - through user feedback and a clear statement of editorial policy
  • Accessibility -with attention to general searchability and usability.
slide94
Rating Health Information on the lnternet. Navigating to Knowledge or to Babel?A.R. Jadad; A. Gagliardi. JAMA 1998;279:611-614

Objectives:

  • Identify instruments used to rate Web sites providing health information on the lnternet
  • Rate criteria used bythem
  • Establish the degree of validation of the instruments,
slide95

Rating Health Information on the lnternet. Navigating to Knowledge or to Babel?A.R. Jadad; A. Gagliardi. JAMA 1998;279:611-614

Data Synthesis

  • 47 rating instruments identified
  • 14 provided a description of the criteria used to produce the ratings
  • 5 provided instructions for their use.
  • None of the instruments identified provided information on the interobserver reliability and construct validity of the measurements.
slide96
Rating Health Information on the lnternet. Navigating to Knowledge or to Babel?A.R. Jadad; A. Gagliardi. JAMA 1998;279:611-614

Conclusions

Manyincompletely developed instruments to evaluate health information exist on the lnternet.

It is unclear, whether they :

  • should exist in the first place,
  • measure what they claim to measure or
  • lead to more good than harm.
slide97
How do consumers search for and appraise health information on the world wide web? Eysenbach G et al. BMJ 2002;324:573-7.

Users explore only the first fewlinks on general search engines

Consumers assess the credibilityof a site by looking for source, professional design, and other criteria

In practice, users do not check the “about us” sections of websites, try to find out who authors or owners of the site are, or read disclaimers or disclosure statements

Very few internet users later remember from which websites they retrieved information or who stood behind the sites

slide98
Users explore only the first fewlinks on general search enginesEysenbach G et al. BMJ 2002;324:573-7.

17 Subjects

271 Queries

763 Web pages

slide99
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History (hardware & internet) 2
  • What info for who? 3
  • Web site design 4
  • Quality of content 5
  • Usage
  • Perspectives 7
slide101

Source of information on flu vaccinationN = 2300 and 1500 residents of the State of Geneva aged 65+

interest in and usage of e health applications and services by older people

Interest in and usage of e-health applications and services by older people

Karl A. Stroetmann PhD, Lutz Kubitschke MA, Tobias Huesing MA,Veli N. Stroetmann MD PhD

Institute for Communications- and Technology Research

Bonn / Germany

www.seniorwatch.de

EF on Population Ageing Research, Copenhagen, Oct. 24, 2002

slide103

Methodology

  • 9,661 respondents aged 50+
  • EU-wide random sample(geographically & socio-demographically stratified)
  • CATI-based telephone interviews during summer 2001
  • Data weighting according to country size and representative for the EU
slide104

Demography of OPS Respondents

Household size:

one person......................22%

two persons....................48%

three persons+...............30%

Age:

50-59.............36%

60-69.............31%

70-79.............25%

80+..................8%

Type of area:

rural/ small town............65%

urban/ suburban............35%

slide105

Access to and usage of general purpose ICT applications

Access:

Standard TV..................98%

Cable TV........................30%

Digital TV.......................13%

Mobile Phone................48%

PC...................................36%

Notebook/Laptop............5%

Internet...........................22%

Usage:

Teletext (on TV)............45%

Mobile Phone................42%

Computer......................27%

Internet..........................17%

slide106

North South Gradient re internet usage

  • shares of internet users among the European older population vary considerably across Europe
  • there is a clear north-south gradient regarding regular internet usage
slide107

ICT involvement - Olderpopulationcovers broad spectrum

  • The old age beginners
  • Computerusers
  • less skills / using computers less often
  • The experienced frontrunners
  • Computerusers
  • Advanced skills or frequently using computers ( > once a week)
  • ICT involvement is a compound indicator which takes account of attitudes, skills and usage data
  • Users are different as to their usage intensity, non-users differ re their openness to become involved.
  • The older population covers the whole variety of ICT involvement
  • About one third are heavily at risk of being left behind.
  • The technologically open-minded
  • Non-users, but
  • Keen on learning or wishing to improve computer skills
  • The digitally challenged
  • Non-users
  • Neither keen on learning nor wishing to improve computer skills
slide108

ICT involvement as a matter of age and education

  • 72% of those aged 50-59 and 21+ years old when finishing their education (i.e. university degree and equivalent) are experienced frontrunners
  • But none of those aged 80+ and leaving school <14 years old are experienced frontrunners.
functional restrictions a challenge for user friendly and assistive technologies
Functional restrictions - a challenge for user-friendly and assistive technologies

Prevalence of functional restrictions

as % of older population

  • Functional restrictions often hinder full scale IST uptake
  • Vision restrictions are most prevalent
  • 21 % suffer from either severe vision, hearing or tactile restrictions
  • 64 % suffer from either severe or light vision, hearing or tactile restrictions

12%

5%

Some

difficulty

26%

27%

Vision

Serious

Hearing

restrictions

11%

10%

19%

Dexterity

Either

restrictions

slide110

Conclusions

  • Vast market for e-Health applications and services(e.g.40% of the European population of 50+ age (49 m people!) are computer users, 27% have advanced skills and use a PC at least once a week)
  • Market will grow substantially as those presently still in work retire ( e.g. when those currently 50 to 65 retire)
  • Diverse access media need to be explored(e.g. TV sets, mobile phones, teletext)
  • User interfaces to allow access for disabled people(e.g. hearing, visual, dexterity)
  • Policy measures required to avoid a "Medical Divide“(e.g. awareness, skills, accessibility)
are elderly interested in e health

Are Elderly interested in e-Health?

François Herrmann*, Celia Boyer, Melanie Provost

European Forum on Population Ageing Research

Workshop on Technology Advances - E-Health And E-Care.

WHO regional Copenhagen, Denmark - 24th October 2002

October 24th, 2002

exploratory analysis of older respondents to the 8 th hon online survey

Exploratory Analysis of Older Respondents to the 8th HON Online Survey

Are Elderly interested in e-Health?

method
Method
  • Voluntary Online Self-administered Questionnaire
    • English and French
    • 3 Sections, 31 questions
    • Posted between March and June 2002
  • Target respondents: Patients and Health Professionals
    • Section II specific to each group
  • Announced on HON’s and collaborator’s web sites (100)
  • Email invitation sent to 16,000 HON newsletter members
results 8 th hon s survey
Total Sample

N=2586

Age Groups:

<=19: 0.9%

20-29: 11.8%

30-39: 19.0%

40-49: 29.3%

50-59: 24.0%

60-69: 9.3%

70-79: 3.1%

>=80: 0.6%

Results – 8th HON’s Survey

13%

focus on older population
Focus on Older Population
  • Sub-sample: 336 respondents, 60 yrs of age and older
  • Demographics:
    • 61% male, 39% female
    • 57% USA, 16% Europe, 6% Canada
    • 72% EN, 7% SP, 6%IT, 3% FR
  • Type of respondents:
    • Patients: 65%
    • Medical professionals: 35%
internet experience of elder
Internet Experience of Elder

All types

  • 35% have been using the Internet for 1-3 years
  • 47% for more than 4 yrs
  • Daily use:
    • 78% from home
    • 56% from work
  • 80% searched medical literature
  • 62% searched disease description
elderly patients and e health
N=217 (65%)

21% buy via on-line pharmacy

Rx 70%

OTC 30%

48% have used online medical consultation services

70% occasionally

30% frequently

23% engaged email correspondance with their own health care providers

Elderly Patients and e-Health

e-health… « e » as in elderly?!

elderly their most important concerns

Concern about the medical Internet?

55% advantage the certified sites

Elderly: their Most Important Concerns

#1 Accuracy of information 23%

#2 Trustworthiness 15%

How to reduce these issue?

Certification and/or accreditation:

62.5% of elderly respondents agree

do patients understand the information
Do patients understand the information?
  • Up to 71% seek info from medical professional sites or sections dedicated to medical professionals (n=217)
  • If the elderly do not understand the information they read (n=150):
    • 28% ask their physician
    • 87% do alternative searches
how do elderly search the internet
Search EnginesNo

General Medical Opinion

N % % %

Health Professionals11624 6111

Patients 217 36 3325

Total 336 32 4321

How do Elderly search the Internet?
slide122
Plan
  • Definitions 1
  • History (hardware & internet) 2
  • What info for who? 3
  • Web site design 4
  • Quality of content 5
  • Usage 6
  • Perspectives
thm 1 internet s a dvantages
THM 1 : Internet’sadvantages

Fast distribution at low cost of

  • Teaching materials
  • News
  • Information
  • Software
  • Database access

For the impaired and the elderly :

  • Zoom and reading functions
thm 2 internet s inconvenients
THM 2 : Internet’s Inconvenients
  • Can still be slow : “World Wide Wait”
  • Quality of information not always guarantied
  • Still needs a minimum of computer literacy
  • Has a cost
  • Lost in a maze
  • Incomplete
  • Advertising
  • Dead URL, site
  • Confidentiality
thm 3 3 d s of evaluating health information
THM 3 : 3 D's of evaluating health information
  • Dates — Health information is dynamic. Look for the most recent information you can find. Reputable Web sites include a date for each article they post.
  • Documentation — Check for the source. Notice whether articles refer to published medical research. Look peer reviews. Turn to sites created by major medical centers, national organizations, universities or government agencies. Be wary of commercial sites.
  • Double-checking — Visit several health sites and compare the information.

Mayo Clinic HealthQuest, November 1999

http://www.mayohealth.org/mayo/9801/htm/judging.htm

thm 4 search strategies
THM 4 : Search strategies
  • Focus: write your search question
  • Search engines: use not only general one but also Medical search engine & portals
  • Hits: looknot only for the first hits
  • Boolean operators—AND OR NOT narrow your searches
  • Bookmarks: keep track of good (and bad) sites
  • Save (or print) results: WEB sites can be down temporarilly or for ever, their URL changed…
perspectives
Perspectives

Wireless

Wearable

Safer

Faster

Easier

Power lines

Grid computing

slide128
Grid
  • Collection of distributed computing resources available over an area network that appear as one large virtual computing system.
  • The vision is to create virtual dynamic organizations through secure, coordinated resource-sharing among individuals, institutions and resources.
  • Grid computing spans locations, organizations, machine architectures and software boundaries to provide unlimited power and collaboration.

http://www-1.ibm.com/grid/grid_what_is.shtml

slide129

Braun and Hogenberg. Civitates Orbis Terrarum

1572: map I-37.

http://historic-cities.huji.ac.il/switzerland/sion/maps/braun_hogenberg_I_37.html