slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
BEIR VII: “The very error of the moon .” Othello, Act II PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
BEIR VII: “The very error of the moon .” Othello, Act II

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 45

BEIR VII: “The very error of the moon .” Othello, Act II - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 256 Views
  • Uploaded on

BEIR VII: “The very error of the moon .” Othello, Act II. Herbert L. Abrams. Blast Thermal & Shock Radiation     Initial Nuclear Residual Nuclear Radiation Radiation. Nuclear Weapons Effects. Thermal Heat Wave.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'BEIR VII: “The very error of the moon .” Othello, Act II' - oshin


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

BEIR VII: “The very error of the moon.”

Othello, Act II

Herbert L.Abrams

slide3

Blast Thermal & Shock Radiation





Initial Nuclear Residual Nuclear

Radiation Radiation

Nuclear

Weapons Effects

slide4

Thermal Heat Wave

A one-second “heat flash” travels at the speed of light: vaporizing, melting, starting fires at a distance.

slide5

Blast

The Wave Travels at Supersonic Speed, Killing People & Destroying Buildings in its Path.

slide6

RADIATION:

The Mystery

Nausea, Vomiting, Loss

of Appetite, Diarrhea,

WBC Drops.

slide7

Radiation Effects

High radiation doses tend to kill cells, while low doses tend to damage the genetic code (DNA).

The higher the dose, the sooner the effects of radiation will appear & the higher the probability of death.

slide8

Radiation Effects

  • “Radiation Sickness”
  • 5 Sieverts or Above Marrow Death
  • 10 Sieverts or Above GI Death
  • 20 Sieverts or Above Neurologic Death
slide13

ABCC (47), RERF (75)

  • Life Span Study: 120,000
  • Adult Health Study: 20,000
slide14

The Cancer Risk From

Low Level Radiation

slide15

Our Committee Report: the 700 page BEIRVII advisory recently issued by the National Research Council.

The last previous report on this subject: 1990.

slide16

The BEIR series of seven reports is widely accepted in many nations as a primary source of radiation risk estimates and protective regulations.

slide17

The 16 member BEIR VII international Study Committee consisted of scientists & educators with expertise in:

  • Epidemiology
  • Radiation Biology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Genetics
  • Radiology
  • Physics
slide18

Submissions & Presentations:

  • University & governmental entities such as the EPA, NRC, DOE
  • NGO, public interest, activist & industry groups
slide19

THE ISSUE

Higher risk estimates:

smaller permissible doses

Lower risk: relaxation of protection standards

Stakes: $millions vs. health

slide22
We defined “low level” radiation as a range from near zero up to 100 milliSieverts (mSv).
  • 30-40 times annual natural background exposure
  • 10 times that of a CT Scan
  • 1000 times that of a chest film.
slide23
Background: radiation from the natural environment represents 82% of human exposure.
  • Outer space
  • The Ground
  • Basic Activities such as eating, drinking & breathing
slide26

Medical & Dental X-Ray Diagnostic Procedures Examinations &

Dose Averages

1985-1990 Average Annual Total Medical Exams: 1200 per 1000

1985-1990 Average Annual Total Dental Exams: 400 per 1000

1980 Average Annual Effective

Dose Per patient examined:

50 millirem

Data Source: Los Alamos, 1995

Photo Credit: Procare4U

slide28

Nuclear Medicine Procedures

Per Annum

  • 1985-1990 Average Number of Procedures

26 per 1000 persons

  • 1982 Average Effective Dose Per Patient

500 millirem

Data Source: Los Alamos, 1995

slide29

Effective Doses Per Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Procedures

CSPmedical.com

Data Source: Los Alamos, 1995

mechanism of cancer induction
Mechanism of Cancer Induction
  • Damage to DNA
  • Single strand breaks
  • Double strand breaks
  • Oxidative changes in nucleotide bases
  • DNA deletions; gene and chromosome damage
slide31

BEIR VII Committee

Conclusions

  • Linear Non-Threshold model of cancer risk prediction validated
  • No evidence of a threshold below which no cellular damage occurs
slide32

Radiation Related Cancer Risk

______ Linear No Threshold Model

slide33

BEIR VII Committee

Conclusions

  • Significant lifetime excess risks were determined for 12 cancers, including lung, liver, breast, prostate, stomach, colon, thyroid and leukemia
slide34

Women

Radiation related cancer mortality risks for woman averaged 37.5%

higher than for menin the solid tumors

slide35

Excess Cases of Cancer per 100,000 Exposed Persons(Exposed at 30, Attained Age 60)

ALL SOLID CANCER

slide36

Small Children

Exposure in infants, as compared to adults, produces 3-4 times the cancer risk.

Photo: Stepin.org

Female infants have almost double the risk of males.

slide38

At low doses, the risk, though increased, is small, one excess cancer in 100 exposed persons during their lifetime. Mortality, as opposed to incidence, would be about one-half.

slide39



















Likelihood of Excess Cancer Vs. Cancer Incidence in 100 Unexposed Persons over Lifetime

slide40

No impact of low levels on heart

disease, in contrast to high doses.

No definite genetic effects in the

offspring of A-bomb survivors.

slide42

Areas Identified for Further Research:

  • Adverse genetic impacts of radiation, emphasizing hereditary effects
  • Health impacts of radiation usage in medical practice
  • Epidemiology of high risk occupations, persons in key areas of former Soviet Union & atomic bomb survivors
slide43

Areas Identified for Further Research:

  • Molecular markers of radiation caused DNA damage
  • Specific role of radiation in development of cancer (tumors)
  • Correlation between radiation & conditions such as heart disease & stroke
slide44

“A star, however willing,

  • cannot help the moon.”
          • Chinese proverb