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Reducing Childhood ETS Exposure. Reaching Parents Who Smoke Kathryn Kahler Vose, M.A. Executive Vice President, Porter Novelli Carrie Schum, M.A. Vice President, Porter Novelli. Reaching Parents Who Smoke.

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reducing childhood ets exposure

Reducing Childhood ETS Exposure

Reaching Parents Who Smoke

Kathryn Kahler Vose, M.A.

Executive Vice President, Porter Novelli

Carrie Schum, M.A.

Vice President, Porter Novelli

reaching parents who smoke
Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • At the end of this presentation, you will understand differences in attitudes and behaviors between parents who smoke and those who don’t, and how these can influence communication designed to reach them.
reaching parents who smoke1
Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Presentation Outline:
    • Scope of the problem.
    • Analysis of Porter Novelli’s Styles data on parents who smoke.
    • Recommendations for developing an ETS reduction program directed at parents who smoke.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • How severe is the problem of childhood ETS exposure? According to the CDC:
    • 15 million children and adolescents were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in their homes in 1996.
    • Between one-third and one-half of adults who currently smoke have children living in the home,
    • The majority (70 percent) allow smoking in some or all areas of the home.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • How severe is the problem of childhood ETS exposure?
    • Children whose parents smoke are more likely to smoke than those whose parents do not smoke.
    • Children whose parents smoke are more likely to suffer from pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma, and other lung diseases.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • About Styles
    • HealthStyles is an annual survey of Americans’ attitudes about health behaviors.
    • ConsumerStyles is an annual survey of what Americans’ are buying and what media they use.
  • The databases are linked so that in-depth portraits of the desired audiences can be created.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • About Styles
    • HealthStyles survey began in 1995.
    • ConsumerStyles began in 1992
    • Survey 6,000 people on 2,000 variables each year.
    • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Cancer Institute, and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have all used Styles data in their communication planning.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • We analyzed data about parents of children under age six, looking at differences between parents who smoke and those who do not smoke.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • What did we learn about parents who smoke?
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Parents who smoke are just as likely to value their health: there were no significant differences between smokers and non-smokers when asked:
    • Living a long life is important to me (75% agreed).
    • Living life in the best possible health us very important to me (about 65% agreed).
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • However, smokers are less likely to agree that:
    • They actively try to prevent disease (26% compared to 36% of non-smokers),
    • They do everything they can to stay healthy (24% compared to 33% of non-smokers), or
    • They search for information when they are sick (49% compared to 55% of non-smokers).
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Parents who smoke don’t want to be lectured at about their health:
    • They are more likely to say that when it comes to health information, they are tired of people telling them what to do (30% compared to 21% of non-smokers).
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Smokers have a harder time comprehending health information.
    • They are almost twice as likely to say that most health issues are too complex for them to understand (19% vs. 10% ), and that they often don’t understand the language doctors use (25% vs. 16%).
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • They rely less on their doctors:
    • Smokers are less likely to say that they have good relationships with their health care providers (42% vs. 52%).
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • But they do rely on their child’s doctor.
    • Over 80% of both smokers and non-smokers say their top source for decisions relating to their child’s health is his or her health care provider.
    • Family and the child’s other parent are the other top sources.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • They know their health could be better.
    • They are less likely than non-smokers to say that they are in excellent or very good health (27% vs. 43%).
    • Correspondingly, they are more likely to say they are in fair or poor health (24% vs. 15%).
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Social influences are very important.
    • Half of all smokers say that most of their friends also smoke.
    • Only 12% of non-smokers agree.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Awareness of the health risks of smoking is low:
    • Only half of smokers with a young child at home recognize that their use of cigarettes is a threat to their health.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Confidence in their ability to quit is low.
    • 39% of parents who smoke say they intend to quit smoking in the next month.
    • Only 23% are confident that they will succeed in quitting for at least one month.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Smokers use some forms of media more than non-smokers.
    • They watch more TV and listen to more radio.
    • But they read fewer magazines and are less likely to look to the Internet for health information.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Smokers watch an average of four more hours of television per week than non-smokers.
    • They are more likely to watch reality TV, soap operas, and music channels.
    • Less likely to watch either local or national news.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Smokers listen to the radio more than non-smokers (about two more hours a week).
    • More likely to listen to classic rock, alternative/progressive rock and hard rock stations.
    • Three times more likely to listen to religious/gospel stations.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Smokers are much less likely to look for health information on the Internet.
    • 49% say they never use the Internet for health information, compared to 33% of non-smokers.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Smokers are significantly more likely to say they do not read any magazines regularly (31% vs. 25%).
    • About 20% read Parenting, 15% say they read Parents.
    • Smokers are more likely than non-smokers to read TV Guide, Cosmopolitan, Glamour, Soap Opera Digest, Consumer Reports, and Playboy.
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What does this mean?Recommendations for Developing a Communications Program to Reach Parents with ETS Messages
keep it simple
Keep it Simple
  • Complex messages are not easily understood by this audience.
stress the positive
Stress the Positive
  • Parents care about their children’s health
    • Focus on the benefits to their children if they quit.
  • Parents doubt their own ability to quit successfully.
    • Offer support.
    • Use personal stories of other parents who have succeeded in quitting.
use personal contacts
Use Personal Contacts
  • Friends and family are powerful influences on smoking parents’ behavior.
  • Pediatricians and their staffs are also trusted sources.
use targeted media
Use Targeted Media
  • Local radio can be effective.
    • try enlisting local DJs with kids to undertake quit attempts and follow their efforts on the air.
  • For national efforts, try working with soap opera writers to get the issue into plot lines.
  • Continue to push the issue with parenting magazines.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke

Conclusion

  • Parents who smoke differ from non-smokers in important ways.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • There are significant barriers to reaching them, including
    • Resistance to being lectured.
    • Strong social support for smoking.
    • Poor relationships with health care providers.
  • Communication must identify benefits that overcome these barriers.
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Reaching Parents Who Smoke
  • Styles data identifies some important benefits:
    • Nearly half of parents who smoke want to quit, and they care about their health.
    • Indicates that they are open to ETS messages if presented in the right way.
  • They use more of some forms of media, so there are more opportunities to reach them.
reducing childhood ets exposure1

Reducing Childhood ETS Exposure

Reaching Parents Who Smoke