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Itinerant ECSE Part B (619) Services: Research Support for Consultation and Legal Authority Under IDEA. Laurie Dinnebeil & Bill McInerney • University of Toledo Kim Carlson Part B 619 Coordinator • Ohio Department of Education. Supporting Inclusion in Community-Based Settings.

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Itinerant ECSE Part B (619) Services: Research Support for Consultation and Legal Authority Under IDEA


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itinerant ecse part b 619 services research support for consultation and legal authority under idea

Itinerant ECSE Part B (619) Services: Research Support forConsultation and Legal Authority Under IDEA

Laurie Dinnebeil & Bill McInerney

• University of Toledo

Kim Carlson

Part B 619 Coordinator

• Ohio Department of Education

supporting inclusion in community based settings
Supporting Inclusion in Community-Based Settings
  • LRE is a basic concept of IDEA and one that must guide service delivery options.
    • LRE for preschoolers is different than for school-aged population.
      • Voluntary nature of preschool
      • Early care and education settings regulated by a variety of entities
early childhood inclusion outcomes
Early Childhood Inclusion-Outcomes
  • Children in inclusive programs do at least as well as children in specialized programs.
  • Benefits children with and without disabilities, especially in social development.
  • Specialized instruction is an important component of inclusion and a moderator of child outcomes.
  • Generally, families view inclusion favorably but quality of programs and services may be a concern.
idea p l 108 446 section 614 a 5 a
IDEA P.L. 108-446 Section 614(a)(5)(A)

To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are not disabled, and special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability of a child is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aides and service cannot be achieved satisfactorily

continuum of service delivery options
Continuum of Service Delivery Options

Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities for special education and related services….

34 CFR 300.38; 300.115

20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(5)

preschoolers served in inclusive settings
Preschoolers Served in Inclusive Settings
  • In 2005, 701,625 preschoolers received Part B 619 services
  • Nationwide, 239,254 (34.1%) of these children receive ECSE service in EC programs (via Itinerant Services)

(www.ideadata.org)

definition itinerant ecse service
Definition: Itinerant ECSE Service
  • Itinerant ECSE service delivery is a primary option used by LEAs to support children’s inclusion in community-based settings.
  • Itinerant services are Part B 619 services delivered by ECSE teachers who visit children with IEPs whose primary placement is their home or a community-based setting.
itinerant ecse service delivery
Itinerant ECSE Service Delivery
  • Historically, itinerant ECSE services have been characterized by the location of service delivery, not the characteristics of the services provided.
  • There are two primary models of itinerant service delivery (Odom et al., 2000):
    • Direct services
    • Collaborative consultation
how many children receive itinerant ecse services

How many children receive Itinerant ECSE Services?

Current USDOE reporting formats and category of service definitions do not provide accurate determination of the # of children served by ITINERANT teachers as primary agent of service delivery in Part B services

based on usdoe definitions iecse s are found in multiple categories

Based on USDOE definitions, IECSE #s are found in multiple categories

2006  >80% and 40-79% time spent in regular ed settings

2005  Part time EC/Part time ECSE, Itinerant service outside the home but not in ECSE setting

slide11

of

617,836

of

637,670

of

670,211

of

700,269

of

701,625

From: ideadata.org

slide12

5% increase from 2001

From: ideadata.org

other ec setting definitions

Other EC Setting Definitions

Part-time EC/Part-time ECSE Setting:

Unduplicated total of preschoolers who received

special education and related services in multiple

settings, including special education and related

services provided in:

the home,

educational programs designed primarily for children without disabilities,

programs designed primarily for children with disabilities,

residential facilities, and separate schools.

part time ec part time ecse continued

Part-Time EC/Part-Time ECSE Continued

Possible itinerant combinations:

home + educational programs designed

primarily for children without disabilities

home + programs designed primarily for children with disabilities

home + separate schools

educational programs designed primarily for children without disabilities + programs designed primarily for children with disabilities

educational programs designed primarily for children without disabilities + separate schools

other setting definitions cont

Other Setting Definitions (cont.)

Itinerant service outside home:

Unduplicated total of preschoolers who received ALL of their special education and related services at a school, hospital facility on an outpatient basis, or other location for a short period of time (i.e., no more than 3 hours per week). These services may be provided individually or to a small group of children.

Possibly Itinerant ECSE included

slide17

5% increase

20% increase

34% increase

20% increase

From: ideadata.org

foundations of consultative approach
Foundations of Consultative Approach
  • Principles of Naturalistic Instruction, including Embedded Learning Opportunities (Horn, Lieber, Li, Sandall, & Schwartz, 2000; Pretti-Frontczak & Bricker, 2004)
foundations of consultative approach21
Foundations of Consultative Approach
  • Principles of Behavioral Consultation and Coaching (Gersten, Morvant, & Brengelman, 1995; Hanft, Rush, & Shelden, 2004; Kohler, 1993; Kohler, Crilley, Shearer, & Good, 1997; Kohler, McCullough, & Buchan, 1995; Peck, Killen, & Baumgart, 1989; Showers & Joyce, 1996; Vail, Tschantz, & Bevill, 1997)
foundation of consultative approach distributed v massed practice effects
Foundation of Consultative Approach:Distributed v. Massed Practice Effects
  • The spacing effect is considered one of the best known and most robust phenomena in experimental psychology (e.g., Bahrick & Hall, 2005; Dempster & Farris, 1990; Rea & Modigliani, 1985) and refers to improved performance if practice sessions are distributed rather than massed.
foundations of consultative approach23
Foundations of Consultative Approach
  • Principles of Distributed Practice (Daugherty, Grisham-Brown, & Hemmeter, 2001; Grisham-Brown, Schuster, Hemmeter, & Collins, 2000; Horn, Lieber, Li, Sandall, & Schwartz, 2000; Pretti-Frontczak, Barr, Macy, & Carter, 2003)
foundation of consultative approach distributed v massed practice effects24
Foundation of Consultative Approach:Distributed v. Massed Practice Effects

Seabrook, Brown, & Solity (2005) concluded that teaching certain literacy skills could be more effective simply by breaking up 1-hour blocks into shorter sessions distributed throughout the day.

foundation of consultative approach distributed v massed practice effects25
Foundation of Consultative Approach:Distributed v. Massed Practice Effects
  • Rea and Modigliani (1985) studied the effects of DISTRIBUTED practice on spelling and multiplication facts with third graders.
    • The children’s performance rates for multiplication doubled when practice was distributed (47% to 24%).
    • Performance was also significantly better in spelling (93% in distributed practice v. 82% in massed practice).
foundation of consultative approach distributed v massed practice effects26
Foundation of Consultative Approach:Distributed v. Massed Practice Effects
  • Childers and Tomasello (2002) taught two-year olds novel nouns and verbs over the course of one month in sessions that lasted 5 to 10 minutes. The results indicated that children learned nouns and verbs best when practice was distributed over four days regardless of the number of intervening days.
foundation of consultative approach distributed v massed practice effects27
Foundation of Consultative Approach:Distributed v. Massed Practice Effects
  • Childers and Tomasello (2002) (cont.)

The least efficient learning occurred when all presentations were done on a single day…..In other words, children learned the word better if they heard it once per day for four days rather than if they heard it eight times in a single day

foundation of consultative approach distributed v massed practice effects28
Foundation of Consultative Approach:Distributed v. Massed Practice Effects
  • Donovan and Radosevich (1999) conducted a meta-analysis of 63 studies of massed and distributed practice and determined an effect of .42. That effect means that a teacher using distributed practice would achieve better results than about 67% of her peers who were using massed practice.
consulting adults
Consulting Adults
  • Nondisabled peers enrolled in preschool special education classroom
  • Teachers teach in same space as blended program
  • Team teaching in the same space with one group of children
  • Itinerant teacher working in an ECE setting
  • Collaborative consultation among staff and with parents
slide30

…children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are not disabled…

  • Children with disabilities are children first
  • Think about
    • Where are same-aged peers during the week ?
    • With whom do same-aged peers interact?
    • What is the curriculum?
    • What is the environment?
    • What are the supports?
key responsibilities
Key Responsibilities
  • Appropriate services to meet needs
  • Continuum of Service Delivery Options Available
    • Centerbased or Itinerant Teacher Services
  • Access to, Participation in, and Progress in the General Curriculum
    • Developmentally appropriate
    • Comprehensive
    • Aligned to Content Standards
  • Opportunities for interaction with nondisabled peers
variations on a theme

School District

Preschool Special

Education

Centerbased

Teacher

  • Enrollment of Nondisabled Peers with
  • Head Start
  • Community Early Learning Provider
  • Public School Preschool

APE &/or

Related

Services

Variations on a Theme
  • Nondisabled peers enrolled in preschool special education classroom
variations on a theme33
Variations on a Theme
  • Teachers teach in same space as blended program
  • Early Childhood Classroom=
  • Head Start
  • Community Early Learning Provider
  • Public School Preschool

School District

Preschool Special

Education

Centerbased

Teacher

APE &/or

Related

Services

variations on a theme34

Early Childhood Classroom=

  • Head Start
  • Community Early Learning Provider
  • Public School Preschool

School District

Preschool Special

Education

Centerbased

Teacher

APE &/or

Related

Services

Variations on a Theme
  • Team teaching in the same space with one group of children
variations on a theme35

Early Childhood Classroom=

  • Head Start
  • Community Early Learning Provider
  • Public School Preschool

School District

Preschool Special

Education

Itinerant Teacher

APE &/or

Related

Services

Variations on a Theme

Itinerant teacher working in an ECE setting

success of a consultative approach depends on
Success of a Consultative Approach Depends On…
  • Strong partnership between an itinerant ECSE teacher and a general ECE teacher
  • Understanding of the roles and responsibilities for each of these ‘partners’
  • High quality early childhood environment
  • LEA administrative support
  • Community support
  • Appropriately prepared itinerant ECSE teachers (e.g. licensure / certification) (Dinnebeil, Pretti-Frontczak, & McInerney, in review)
requisite knowledge of iecse teachers
Requisite Knowledge of IECSE Teachers
  • Child development (typical and atypical)
  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment methods
  • Principles of ECSE and specialized instruction
  • Consultation and coaching strategies
  • Operating principles and models of community-based early childhood programs (Dinnebeil, Buysse, Rush, & Eggbeer, in press).
requisite skills of iecse teachers
Requisite Skills of IECSE Teachers
  • Skilled and experienced as ECSE classroom teachers
  • Ability to act intentionally in use of differentiated strategies to address children’s IEP goals and objectives.
  • Ability to serve as an effective consultant or coach (Dinnebeil et al., in press)
implications for leas
Implications for LEAs

LEAs should develop formal policies that outline the roles and responsibilities of both the itinerant and early childhood teachers in order to ensure a joint understanding of job expectations.

Policies should be promulgated to parents, community-based child care / pre-K supervisors and ‘partner’ ECE teachers

implications for leas and communities
Implications for LEAs and Communities
  • Ohio’s vision for high quality, inclusive early childhood services presumes that systems will work together to promote effective practices.
  • Implementing a consultative itinerant approach will expand the range of high quality LRE options and enhance the overall quality of inclusive ECE environments.
in general where are ohio s preschool children with disabilities being served
In general, where are Ohio’s preschool children with disabilities being served?

ECE Setting with 50% or more same aged peers

OR NOT

ohio initiatives a sample
Ohio Initiatives- a sample
  • Professional Development
    • CORE Literacy Curriculum for Teachers
      • Itinerant Model
    • Content Standards/Accommodations
    • Curriculum/Assessment/Instruction
  • Research
    • Assessment
    • University
    • Parent Focus Groups
questions
Questions
  • What is required to ensure children have the opportunity to be educated with nondisabled peers?
  • What are the financial impacts of the recommendation?
  • What are the best strategies for promoting a district’s relationship with ELI, ECE and community settings?
questions44
Questions
  • How to communicate best with community preschool/child care regarding the district’s responsibilities to locate, identify, evaluate preschool children with disabilities?
  • How to establish a working relationship with district to develop and implement an IEP for preschool children with disabilities?
lre is not
LRE is NOT…
  • Predetermining placement
  • Predetermining services
  • Using a cookie-cutter approach to service delivery
  • Limiting service delivery to district programs
  • Limiting service delivery to funding sources
lre is
LRE is….
  • Looking at the whole child
  • Thinking of the child’s day and week
  • Considering the number of transitions a child must deal with
  • Building relationships between the district and community early learning providers
  • Providing special education services in an environment in which the child spends majority of time
early learning content standards
Early Learning Content Standards

Describe essential early concepts, and skills for ALL Ohio’s children

  • Addresses content areas:
    • English Language Arts
    • Mathematics
    • Science
    • Social Studies
eli guidelines format
ELI Guidelines Format

SECTION II: Environments Matter

Outcome 2: Educators have the knowledge and skills necessary to support children’s learning.

Goal 2: Educators demonstrate nurturing and supportive relationships with children to promote self-assurance and competence.

Indicators

A.

B.

References

Probes to Facilitate Strategic Design & Action

section ii environments matter
Section II: Environments Matter

Child and Family Outcome Measures

Aligned with P-12

Content Standards

ProgramCapacity Measures

Curriculum-EmbeddedPerformance Measures

child outcomes
Child Outcomes
  • Get It, Got It, Go!
  • Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Social-Emotional
  • Curriculum-based Assessments
  • Early Childhood Outcomes Summary Form
ecosf
ECOSF
  • Core Group Communicates
    • General Preschool Teacher
    • Special Preschool Teacher
    • Parent
    • Related Services Personnel
ecosf53
ECOSF

Early childhood outcomes summary form

  • Ongoing assessment system
  • Summary
    • Sources of information
    • Over time
    • Varying interactions
    • Different perspectives
    • Generalizations
  • Analysis
  • Evaluation of fidelity
transdisciplinary model
Transdisciplinary Model
  • Interactions
    • Child
    • Staff
    • Parents
  • Settings
  • Conditions
  • Transitions
transdisciplinary model56
Transdisciplinary Model
  • Role release
  • Successful strategies and supports
  • Discrepancies
transdisciplinary model57
Analysis

Communication

IEP

Ongoing assessment system

Staff

Parents

Sending/Receiving Environments

Systems/Infrastructure

Transdisciplinary Model
challenges to adoption of expansion of iecse services
Challenges to Adoption of Expansion of IECSE Services
  • Lack of High Quality EC Settings
  • CONFUSION around roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders (EC teacher, itinerant, supervisor)
  • Lack of time to collaborate
implications for profession
Implications for Profession
  • If DISTRIBUTED is the research-based model for intervention in IECSE model, what are implications for SEA and LEA re: public promulgation of consultation as recommended practice vs. direct service?
implications for profession60
Implications for Profession
  • A shift towards a consultative approach may meet with resistance from the field as a result of dramatic shift in roles and responsibilities of IECSE teachers (and supervisors)
support for consultation services policy briefs
Support for Consultation Services: Policy Briefs
  • Activity supported in part by the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE), Early Childhood Network
    • help states increase their ability to create integrated, high-quality ECE policies, programs, and services
highlights of the policy brief
Highlights of the Policy Brief
  • Description of consultative model in itinerant ECSE service delivery.
  • Description of differences between a consultative and direct service approach in itinerant ECSE service delivery