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Teaching Higher Order Literacy Skills through the LNF: Primary Course. Agenda. Higher Order Literacy Skills: an introduction Literacy in Action Children as Researchers: a non-fiction unit Higher Order Literacy Skills and the LNF The Power of Story: a fiction-based unit

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agenda
Agenda
  • Higher Order Literacy Skills: an introduction
  • Literacy in Action
  • Children as Researchers: a non-fiction unit
  • Higher Order Literacy Skills and the LNF
  • The Power of Story: a fiction-based unit
  • Building a Literacy Rich School
higher order reading skills what are they
Higher Order Reading Skills – What Are They?
  • Location
  • Re-organisation
  • Inference
  • Evaluation
  • Appreciation
reading and writing for real
Reading and Writing for Real

Providing children with:

  • An engaging and motivating ‘hook’
  • A clear purpose for reading and writing
  • A strong context for applying literacy skills
  • Authentic audiences for reading and writing
  • An unfolding narrative to retain their interest
real realistic or pure fantasy
Real, Realistic or Pure Fantasy?
  • Real
  • Realistic – could be real – but it isn’t! (or maybe there are elements of truth?)
  • Fantasy – developing the imagination – having fun!
creating reading and writing for real experiences
Creating Reading and Writing for Real experiences

Classroom based e.g. artefacts, letters, visitors, teacher/TA in role

School based e.g. playground or field event

Out of school e.g. visit or trip

key questions
Key questions
  • What did they look like?
  • Where did they live?
  • How did they move?
  • What did they eat?
research process
Research process
  • Activate prior knowledge
  • Identify research questions
  • Set a purpose for reading
  • Navigate non-fiction texts
  • Interrogate the text
  • Record and evaluate information
skimming and scanning
Skimming and scanning
  • Skimming – to quickly identify the main ideas in a text
  • Scanning – to find specific information
skimming
Skimming
  • Read the title, headings and sub-headings
  • Look at visuals
  • Read first and last sentences of paragraphs and sections
  • Keep thinking about the meaning of the text
scanning
Scanning
  • Know what questions you are trying to answer
  • Don’t try to read every word
  • Read vertically rather than horizontally
  • Visualise key words
  • Look for clues e.g. capital letters, spelling patterns, word shapes, numbers
  • Use signposts e.g. sub titles, headings, headers
  • Use textual organisational devices e.g. alphabetical order
interrogate the text
Interrogate the text
  • Unknown words – to work out word meanings
  • Stop and think – to monitor understanding
  • Check the text – to interpret visuals
  • Text marking – to identify key information
  • Read, write, read – to read for meaning
  • Ask the teacher – to formulate questions and monitor understanding
  • Analyse the question – to answer different types of question
  • Find the main idea – to identify key information
record and evaluate information
Record and evaluate information
  • Key words
  • Notemaking
  • Change the form
  • Children’s quiz
  • Next steps
slide16

Phase 1

Reading

Immersion

Analysis

Reading as a writer

Read texts

-enjoy,

-discuss vocabulary

-language features

-effect on audience

Create an experience

- to hook pupils in

- give reason to write

Phase 2

Speaking & Listening

Capturing ideas

Drama

Oral rehearsal

  • Explore language
  • use it
  • explore content
  • empathise

Try out ideas

Explore further

texts, videos etc

Phase 3

Writing

Writing as a reader

Presenting

Allow adequate

time to complete

writing task and

present work

Plan

Model the writing

process

children as researchers benefits in relation to lnf
Children as Researchers:Benefits in relation to LNF
  • Provides a meaningful context for learning to take place
  • Opportunity to practise and apply skills for a clear purpose and audience
  • Mixes literacy skills with subject content
  • Focuses on active learning
  • Flexible and transferable – can tweak existing programmes of work
understanding the lnf

Understanding the LNF

Key Issues for Primary Schools

the lnf some key messages
The LNF: Some Key Messages
  • Focuses mainly on planning and assessment
  • Establishes national expectations year on year
  • Guide to progression in key aspects of literacy
  • Cross-curricular (all subjects, incl. English)
  • Cross-phase (5-14)
the lnf some key issues
The LNF: Some Key Issues
  • What definition of literacy are we using?
  • What is the relationship between English (or Welsh) and Literacy?
  • At primary level, should literacy be taught in English lessons, then practised across the curriculum, or taught in the context of subjects/themes?
  • How/where do we bring together the ‘whole picture’ of a school’s reading programme, or a child’s competence as a writer?
definitions of literacy
Definitions of Literacy

Literacy is not narrowly about the mechanics of being able to decode the words on a page or write a grammatically correct sentence, although these are essential skills in their own right.

It is about the skills needed to understand written and spoken language, to interpret what has been written or said, and draw inferences from the evidence that surrounds us. It is also about being able to communicate in our turn – fluently, cogently and persuasively.

extracts from lnf handbook
Extracts from LNF Handbook
  • The LNF focuses on the learner’s acquisition of and ability to apply the skills and concepts they have learned in order to complete realistic tasks appropriate to their stage of development.
  • Teachers will be able to use the LNF to integrate literacy … into their teaching whatever the subject matter
extracts from lnf handbook1
Extracts from LNF Handbook
  • Literacy is not the same as English/Welsh; as a consequence the LNF expectations do not address all aspects of the English/Welsh subject orders and need to be used in combination with other forms of assessment to develop a comprehensive picture of learner achievement.
  • The literacy component of the LNF will help teachers to address the literacy skills requirements of the English/Welsh programmes of study but not the more literary/creative aspects of the subject orders.
the power of story1
The Power of Story
  • Central importance of stories, rhymes and oral storytelling in developing language
  • Role of reading in developing writing:

‘it’s good readers that make good writers’

  • Need to balance experience of fiction and non-fiction in children’s experience
book talk first thoughts
Book Talk – First thoughts

Likes ?

Dislikes ?

Puzzles ?

Patterns ?

From: Tell Me: Children, Reading and Talk by

Aidan Chambers, published by Thimble Press 2011

the journey
The Journey
  • Reading as a Reader

An experience - The ‘hook’

Book Talk

Storytelling

Loitering with the text

  • Reading as a Writer

Boxing up

Drama into Writing

Shared writing

  • Writing as a Reader

Springing off the Page

Writing for Real

read as a writer
Read as a Writer.
  • The BIG pattern - box up the story - into 5 key scenes.
  • Story type and focus?
  • The smaller patterns - read as a writer.
the writing process
The Writing Process

Draw on original model and ‘toolkit’

Refer to story map and boxed up plan

Draw on other books and previous teaching

Model the writing task

Shared writing

Guided/independent writing.

slide36

Phase 1

Reading

Immersion

Analysis

Reading as a writer

Read texts

-enjoy,

-discuss vocabulary

-language features

-effect on audience

Create an experience

- to hook pupils in

- give reason to write

Phase 2

Speaking & Listening

Capturing ideas

Drama

Oral rehearsal

  • Explore language
  • use it
  • explore content
  • empathise

Try out ideas

Explore further

texts, videos etc

Phase 3

Writing

Writing as a reader

Presenting

Allow adequate

time to complete

writing task and

present work

Plan

Model the writing

process

reflection
Reflection

How can this approach help to take children from reading into writing?

How can this approach be applied to other texts you have used in the classroom?

what would estyn hope to see
What would Estyn hope to see?
  • A rich and dynamic literacy environment, where speaking, listening, reading, writing have high status
  • Plenty of good opportunities for pupils to show higher-order reading skills and good quality writing in all areas of the curriculum
  • Good quality displays of a wide range of texts illustrating the forms and purposes of writing, and pupil-generated examples celebrating best work
  • Practitioners who are good language role models for oracy, reading and writing
  • Practitioners who support the development of good literacy skills in all areas of the curriculum
pupil perception survey
Pupil perception survey
  • Do you enjoy writing? Yes, no, sometimes.
  • Why?
  • What sort of writing do you prefer to do and why?
  • What sort of writing is your least favourite and why?
  • Are you a good writer? Yes, no, sometimes.
  • How do you know?
  • What helps you when you are writing?
  • Think of 3 top tips that you would give a new teacher to help children become better writers.
the professional literacy company
The Professional Literacy Company
  • E-mail: info@theplc.org.uk
  • Website: www.theplc.org.uk
  • @ProfLitCo