Tanya Figueroa Gina Garcia Bryce Hughes Sylvia Hurtado - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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trajectories of underrepresented students in stem findings from research implications for practice n.
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  1. Trajectories of Underrepresented Students in STEM: Findings from Research & Implications for Practice Tanya Figueroa Gina Garcia Bryce Hughes Sylvia Hurtado AACU 2012

  2. Purpose of this Session Gain an understanding of the unique experiences of students of color in STEM Identify challenges and opportunities to URM retention and improve the use of “evidence-based” approaches Discuss best practices for diversifying the STEM postsecondary pipeline and creating more equitable outcomes Discuss implications for your institution

  3. Overview/History of Project • What do successful STEM pathways look like for underrepresented minority (URM) students? • URM = African American, Latina/o, and American Indian • Mixed method study • Longitudinal surveys • Campus site visits using focus groups, interviews over the last eight years

  4. Efficacy of URP on intentions to enroll in graduate school That was key for me was having research experience as an undergrad and somebody to kind of push you to do it. I think that's fundamental. That's how you get interested in graduate school...But yeah, undergrad research is a must. When you present, you're presenting at meetings and you're writing papers and essentially like I was an undergrad, I did a research project for two years--an independent research project that we're publishing now. (Steven, Native American, graduate ecology major)

  5. Identifying student talent [I identify talent] by those people who ask good questions in class. By people who are not willing to accept things on face value. Or they will dispute statements that I make. Sometimes they win a few, sometimes they lose a few, sometimes we get a few rained out. I like that. (Professor Burke, Southwestern Private Research University)

  6. Sample • 58,292 Students; 353 Institutions • Sources: • 2004 Freshman Survey (CIRP) • 2010 National Student Clearinghouse • 2007 and 2010 STEM Faculty Surveys (HERI) • Best Practices Survey • IPEDS data on institutions • 2004 TFS student data linked with 2010 NSC completion data, then matched with STEM faculty data by institution • Method: Hierarchical Generalized Linear Modeling

  7. American Indian Completers (STEM vs. Non-STEM, 6 years) Of the 1,160 American Indian STEM starters who successfully complete a degree, 52.2% complete a degree in STEM. Institutional factors associated with switching out of STEM: • Public control (compared to private) • Liberal arts colleges (compared to master's comprehensive) • HSIs (compared to PWIs) Normative context associated with STEM completion: • Higher proportions of peers in STEM • Greater proportions of faculty involving undergrads in research

  8. American Indian Completers (STEM vs. Non-STEM, 6 years) Students are more likely to finish in STEM when they: • Have a higher high school GPA • Spend more hours per week spent studying in HS • Have a higher Composite SAT • Aspire to be a doctor • Aspire to attain a PhD/EdD • Plan to major in health technology or nursing Students who are less likely to finish in STEM include: • Women • Those whose mother's level of education is higher • Those with a higher social self-concept

  9. Black Completers (STEM vs. Non-STEM, 6 years) Of the 4,923 Black STEM starters who successfully complete a degree, 51.8% complete a degree in STEM. Institutional factors associated with switching out of STEM: • Having a higher percentage of pre-med students in the student body • Larger institutions • Offering undergraduate research opportunities (without accounting for actual student participation) Students are less likely to finish in STEM when they: • Are a Native English speaker • Have a higher social self-concept

  10. Black Completers (STEM vs. Non-STEM, 6 years) Students are more likely to finish in STEM when they: • Have a higher high school GPA • Spend more hours per week studying/doing homework • Have a higher SAT composite score • Have a stronger academic self-concept • Major in engineering (compared to the biological sciences) • Have a parent who works in a STEM related occupation • Aspire to attain a medical degree • However medical degree aspirants are more likely to switch out of STEM at more selective institutions

  11. Latina/o Completers (STEM vs. Non-STEM, 6 years) Of the 3,717 Latina/o STEM starters who successfully complete a degree, 54.2% complete a degree in STEM. Normative context associated with STEM completion: • Having a greater percentage of the STEM faculty who grade on a curve Students are more likely to finish in STEM when they: • Have higher high school grades • GPA effect is enhanced when STEM faculty on campus use student-centered pedagogy • Have mothers with a higher level of education • Come from lower/middle income families in comparison to those from middle income families

  12. Latina/o Completers (STEM vs. Non-STEM, 6 years) Students are more likely to finish in STEM when they: • Have a higher SAT composite score • Have a stronger academic self-concept • Aspire to be a doctor • Intend to major in engineering as compared to biological sciences Students are less likely to finish in STEM are those who: • Intend to major in the physical sciences • Have a higher social self-concept • Aspire to be a lawyer

  13. Student-centered pedagogy [My professor], I know, she would bring in visuals and we would learn things, like Legos, or she would even bring in puppets. You know, it sounds childish but I’m a visual learner, and she would give us coloring sheets and we would color them in class while she lectured, so it was really helpful. She really knew what she was doing and like we did well. It was about plants and the formation of gametes and all that, and we really learned the material because she brought in visuals. I think she really realized that most of us are visual learners. (Celina, African American Female, Health Science Major)

  14. Interactive Pedagogy Most of my, my professors, they’re pretty much approachable like, you know, theyalways ask us do you have any questions or not, like am I going too fast, do you understand, and we’re allowed to like raise your, we’re allowed to like interact with him, you know, to show that we understand. (Marc, African American, freshman, Pharmaceutical Science)

  15. Small Group Discussion How did these findings challenge or affirm what you already know about the experiences of underrepresented minority students in the STEM pipeline? How does this inform policy aimed at improving STEM diversity and academic outcomes? Considering the context of your own institution, what might these findings suggest about the implicit and explicit ways your campus may be hindering or supporting the success of URM students in STEM?

  16. Conclusion Contexts Matter! • Research universities do not appear to be leveraging their resources toward STEM degree completion • Particularly undergraduate research opportunities • Availability does not equal access • The Power of Peers • Competition versus cooperation within student culture

  17. Conclusion (continued) Supportive Environments Work! • Minority engineers are more likely to be retained in STEM if they complete college compared to bioscience aspirants • Faculty student centered pedagogy was important to staying in STEM for high-achieving minority students • Call for evidence-based teaching practices in STEM

  18. Contact Information