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8 th REGENERATION MANAGEMENT RESEARCH NETWORK Matching rhetoric with reality: the challenge for third sector involvement in local governance Wednesday 18 th June 2008 Matthew Jackson, Senior Policy Researcher. About CLES and our work on local governance.

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slide1

8th REGENERATION MANAGEMENT RESEARCH NETWORK

Matching rhetoric with reality: the challenge for third sector involvement in local governance

Wednesday 18th June 2008

Matthew Jackson, Senior Policy Researcher

slide2

About CLES and our work on local governance

  • Information and publications service
  • Training and events
  • Policy Research
  • Consultancy
  • Policy Advice
slide3

The role of the third sector in local governance?

‘The voluntary sector, described by Kendall and Knapp (1995) as a ‘loose and baggy monster’, is made up of many diverse organisations ranging from the multitude of unregistered and unincorporated associations through national and international service providers and multi-million pound organisations, but there is no universal agreement on the exact nature of the beast’

(Myers and Sacks, 2001)

slide4

Why are CLES bothered about the third sector?

  • local economic contributors
  • service delivery fairness
  • social equality and justice
  • local knowledge – local solutions
  • compliment the local authority
  • some strategic skills
  • a variety and diversity
  • local government modernisation
slide5

The changing view of the third sector

  • Not fluffy but hard
  • Not grants but contracts
  • Not peripheral but central
  • Not just volunteering but employment
  • Not necessarily small scale
  • Not disorganised but professional
slide6

The waves of third sector involvement in local governance

Two Waves?

  • Increasing central value of their role
  • Wave 1 – ‘voice’
    • Major regeneration programmes
      • City Challenge
      • SRB
      • Community Empowerment Networks
      • Local Strategic Partnerships
  • Wave 2 – ‘strategic engager and deliverer’
    • Strategic governance
      • contracts AND grants
      • Sustainable Community Strategies
      • Local Area Agreements
slide7

What are Local Area Agreements?

Funding

Sustainable

Communities

Strategy

LSP

National Priorities

LAA

Enterprise & Economic Development

Healthier communities, and older people

Safer and stronger communities

Children and young people

---------------------------------------------------

LAA Reward Grant

Local Community

Local Community

Local Partners

Commissioning

Monitoring and Reporting

Scrutiny

Outcomes

slide8

The policy rhetoric

  • Delivery focused PSA Target
  • Funding for infrastructure, knowledge and capacity
  • Statements of involvement for LSP/LAA/LDF/
  • A central commitment
  • ‘grants’ to ‘contracts’
  • Efficiency AND effectiveness
slide9

The reality

  • A mixed picture across the country
  • Involvement dependent upon
    • quality of umbrella representative bodies
    • approach of local authority
    • time and capacity
    • size of organisation
    • Understanding of the role of the sector
    • aspirations around funding
slide10

Barriers to engagement

A range of barriers to engagement

  • Lack of trust
  • Poor communication
  • ‘junior partners’
  • What do the third sector do?
  • Low levels of professional skills
  • Perceived reliance upon grants
slide11

Good practice in reality

  • Playing the local governance game
    • A build upon existing strong relationships
    • Play to your strengths
    • Base involvement upon effective delivery
    • Co-ordinate and deliver
  • The benefits of involvement
    • Growth and influence
    • Delivery sustainability
    • An opportunity for engagement
    • An opportunity to communicate
slide12

National indicators, new LAAs and the third sector

  • Local Government White Paper Ramped Up Importance of Local Area Agreements:
    • role of local authority
    • New Duties for development, negotiation and delivery
    • New performance indicators
    • The Third Sector
    • Funding the LAA
slide13

Performance indicators

  • A typology of indicators
    • 1. Easy to measure through national data sources
      • NI 151 – Overall employment rate
    • 2. Partner dependent
      • 2. N1 152 – Working age people on out of work benefits
    • 3. Perceptive and service user focused
      • 3. NI 1 - % of people who believe people from different backgrounds get on well together in their local area
    • 4. Strong link to policy priorities
      • 4. NI 117 – 16 – 18 year olds who are not in education, training or employment
    • 5. National priority focused
      • NI 35 – Building resilience to violent extremism
    • 6. Difficult to measure
      • NI 7 – environment for a thriving third sector
slide14

Level 1

As a Communicator of activities

Level 2

As a Local Authority/ Community Broker

Level 3

As an advocate of policy

Level 4

Through a Third Sector Infrastructure Body

Level 5

As a Thematic Partner

Level 6

As a Strategic Partner / Lead

Level 7

As a Service Deliverer

Level 8

As a Strategic Deliverer

The spectrum of third sector involvement

How could the third sector be involved in local governance – a spectrum of roles:

slide15

The future role – what do the sector need to do?

  • Organisations need to ask themselves a series of questions:
    • Does the organisation have the capacity to be involved in local governance activities?
    • Does the organisation have the strategic capacity?
    • Does involvement in local governance distract from project activity?
    • Does involvement in local governance correlate with the ethos, aims and objectives of the organisation?
    • Does involvement in local governance come based upon strong existing links or is the organisation in effect moving into new themes and arenas and geographical areas?
    • How will involvement in local governance affect the organisations service users and members?
slide16

The future role – what do local governance mechanisms need to do?

  • Local governance mechanisms need to:
    • Understand the diversity of the sector
    • Understand the variety of the sector
    • Assess the strategic capacity of the third sector
    • Look beyond the usual suspects
    • Build up relations with and listen to third sector umbrella bodies
    • Engage the third sector in service planning as well as strategic governance
slide17

Conclusion

  • Are the third sector ready for this?
  • Is there the local authority commitment to third sector delivery?
  • Does it really mean better outcomes and more effective delivery?
  • Are the third sector really a loose and baggy monster?
  • Further information
  • 0161 236 7036 matthewjackson@cles.org.uk