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Department of Labor and Workforce Development Workforce Development Board Meeting. Nashville, TN June 20, 2014. Pathways to Prosperity Report. Published in February 2011 William Symonds, Robert Schwartz & Ronald Ferguson Harvard Graduate School of Education

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department of labor and workforce development workforce development board meeting

Department of Labor and Workforce DevelopmentWorkforce Development Board Meeting

Nashville, TNJune 20, 2014

slide2

Pathways to Prosperity Report

  • Published in February 2011
    • William Symonds, Robert Schwartz & Ronald Ferguson
    • Harvard Graduate School of Education
    • Widely acclaimed nationally and globally
  • March 2012: Bob Schwartz - featured speaker, Education & Industry Summit, VW
  • April 2012: Invited to submit Letter of Interest
  • June 2012: Selected to join Pathways to Prosperity Network (9 states currently); HGSE, JFF conveners

California

Missouri

Illinois

Ohio

New York

Massachusetts

North Carolina

Georgia

Tennessee

Long Beach, CA*

http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news_events/features/2011/Pathways_to_Prosperity_Feb2011.pdf

slide3

The Challenge

Roughly half of all Americans reach their mid-20s without the skills or credentials essential for success in today’s increasingly demanding economy.

1.3 million students drop out of high school each year

less than half of all college students earn a credential within six years.  

The most common pathway to a career—a high school diploma and a four-year college degree—is not effective for all.

If we fail to expand the ways we prepare youth for postsecondary education and the workforce, their quality of life will suffer, our society will lose out on their potential contributions, and the costs to our economy will be severe.

Further, 55% of Tennessee jobs will require at least a technical certification by 2025.

slide4

2014 Manufacturing and Logistics ReportNational Profile

Source: 2014 Manufacturing and Logistics Report http://projects.cberdata.org/reports/Conexus2014-US.pdf

slide5

Other Reporting Areas

Tax Climate……………………………..C

Expected Fiscal Liability Gap……C+

Sector Diversification………………B

Productivity & Innovation……….C-

Source: 2014 Manufacturing and Logistics Report http://projects.cberdata.org/reports/Conexus2014-US.pdf

slide6

“Human capital (especially educational background) is the most important factor in firm location decisions.”

  • Human Capital Measurements Include:
    • educational attainment at the high school and collegiate level
    • the first-year retention rate of adults in community and technical colleges
    • number of associates degrees awarded annually on a per capita basis
    • share of adults enrolled in adult basic education

Source: 2014 Manufacturing and Logistics Report http://projects.cberdata.org/reports/Conexus2014-US.pdf

slide7

The Response: Pathways Tennessee

Overall Goal

To provide Tennessee students in grades 7th-14th/16th access to rigorous academic/career pathways, which are interlinked with local, regional, and state economic/labor market needs and trends in order to develop and promote a workforce that is educated and skilled in their chosen fields.

Statewide Plan

Goal will be achieved through a statewide policy-oriented, initiative-driven, data-supported plan based on identified regional strengths/opportunities and willing local and regional network partners.

Statewide Planning & Implementation Team

Department of Economic & Community Development

Department of Education

Department of Labor & Workforce Development

Governor’s Office

State Collaborative on Reforming Education

Tennessee Business Roundtable

Tennessee Higher Education Commission

Tennessee State Board of Education

Tennessee Independent Colleges and

Universities Association

slide8

How Do We Accomplish This?

A robust, aligned learning experience, which blends academics and relevant work experiences from grade 7-14/16

Image Credit: Corporate Voices for Working Families

slide9

Components of a Grades 7-14/16 Pathway

Source: Clagett & Hale (2012) “The Promise of Career Pathways Systems Change”

slide10

What Does A Pathway Look Like?

  • RELEVANT
  • Work-Based Learning (Grades 7-14)
  • Early Postsecondary Opportunities (Grades 9-12)
  • Career Awareness (Grades 7-14)
  • Stackable Credentials (Grades 9+)

High School Program of Study (Advanced Manufacturing)

  • Technology College (Industry Certification)
  • CNC Operator
  • $35,580

Middle School Foundation (PLTW) and Career Exploration

  • Community College (A.A./A.S)
  • Mechanical Engineering Technician
  • $50,660
  • University or College (B.A./B.S)
  • Mechatronics Engineer
  • $82,440
  • SUSTAINABLE
  • Secondary & Postsecondary Academic Alignment
  • Industry Engagement
  • Community Engagement
where does labor lwia fit into a pathway
Where does Labor/LWIA fit into a pathway?

Successful Pathway

  • Pathways include traditional and nontraditional students
  • Reflects regional labor needs and constraints
  • Strong transitional support
  • Industry Involvement
  • Owned on the local and regional level

Success includes LWIA

  • Ability to provide immediate, responsive assistance
  • Good understanding of the regional needs across state
  • Provides crucial services beyond education
  • Works with a wide range of industries to meet needs of employer AND employee
  • LWIA 5- YCC Grant Partnership
  • LWIA 9- Skills Panel

Pathways TN provides an opportunity to meet federal obligations while

moving state priorities through cross- collaboration.

slide12

Where Will The Jobs Be?

  • Department of Economic and Community Development’s
  • Key Industries:
      • Aerospace and Defense
      • Automotive
      • Chemicals, Plastics and Rubber
      • Transportation, Distribution and Logistics
      • Energy Technology
      • Food and Agribusiness
      • Healthcare and Medical Devices
      • Business Services (HQs, Data centers, Call Centers)
      • Entertainment and Media

These sectors have current employment of over 489,000 individuals and are expected to grow to 529,000 by 2020.

Source: Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Labor Market Information Section, State Employment Projections 2012 to 2020.

slide13

Bridgestone Case Study

Motlow State Mechatronics Program

Motlow State Community College and Bridgestone partnered to develop a mechatronics program based on the Siemens Mechatronics Systems approach to advanced manufacturing.

Offered at both of Bridgestone’s facilities in Tennessee

Only program in the U.S. to offer a three-step pathway for advanced-manufacturing education including a:

One-year mechatronics certification,

Two-year associates degree, or

Bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at Middle Tennessee State University

“This program is about teaching high-tech skills for advanced manufacturing, promoting critical thinking andproblem-solving, and it offers international certification” that the graduates can take with them wherever they go. - MaryLouApple, President of MotlowState

slide14

“Human capital (especially educational background)

is the most important factor in firm location decisions.”

  • Human Capital Measurements Include:
    • educational attainment at the high school and collegiate level
    • the first-year retention rate of adults in community and technical colleges
    • number of associates degrees awarded annually on a per capita basis
    • share of adults enrolled in adult basic education

Source: 2014 Manufacturing and Logistics Report http://projects.cberdata.org/reports/Conexus2014-US.pdf

slide15

“Create something that will make the world awesome.” – Kid President

NICK HANSENProgram Manager | Pathways TNNick.Hansen@tn.gov

WISTY PENDERBERO, Director| Strategy Wisty.Pender@tn.gov