chapter 4 nomenclature l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 4 Nomenclature PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 4 Nomenclature

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 23

Chapter 4 Nomenclature - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 266 Views
  • Uploaded on

Chapter 4 Nomenclature. BEWARE!!! There is a lot memorization involved with this chapter. . In the old days compounds had common names like: water, milk of magnesia, gypsum, quicklime, etc. Today we know of over 4 million compounds. Common names won’t work Therefore we have a system!

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Chapter 4 Nomenclature' - omer


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
chapter 4 nomenclature

Chapter 4Nomenclature

BEWARE!!!

There is a lot memorization involved

with this chapter.

slide2
In the old days compounds had common names like: water, milk of magnesia, gypsum, quicklime, etc.
  • Today we know of over 4 million compounds. Commonnames won’t work
  • Therefore we have a system!
  • First we will learn aboutbinary compounds, compounds made of two elements
  • There are two classes:

1) metal/nonmetal

2) nonmetal/nonmetal

4 1 naming compounds that contain a metal and a nonmetal
4.1 Naming Compounds that Contain a metal and a Nonmetal
  • Metals tend to lose electrons e-,
  • Nonmetals gain electrons e-
  • Metals like to be positive +
  • Nonmetals like to be negative -
  • These get together to form binary ionic compounds
slide4
When writing the

formula the cation is

first, anion second

  • When naming justsay their names
  • Some cations haveonly one chargeever (called Type I ion)
  • Some have more thanone (Type II ion)
  • There are also Type I compounds and Type II compounds

KNOW YOUR IONS!!!

type i binary ionic compounds
Type I Binary ionic compounds
  • Reviewing the rules:
type ii binary ionic compounds
Type II binary ionic compounds
  • Some cations can form more than one charge!!!

(Type II ion!)

Let’s look at an example….

  • iron can form 2+ and 3+ ions
  • so what is the iron in iron chloride? Fe2+ or Fe3+?
  • must be a way to distinguish the two!
  • use Roman numerals…
slide7
So what is the nameof FeCl2?
  • Chloride always hasa 1- charge, and thereare two, so…
  • The positive guy musthave a total2+ charge, and…
  • There is only one cation so it get the whole 2+ charge all to itself, so…
  • It must be iron(II), so…
  • It is iron(II) chloride
  • Know Table 4.2 (the systematic is emphasized in this class!!)
examples
examples
  • CuCl
  • copper(I) chloride
  • HgO
  • mercury(II) oxide
  • Fe2O3
  • iron(III) oxide
  • Mn2O4
  • manganese(IV) oxide
  • PbCl4
  • lead(IV) chloride
summary examples
summaryexamples
  • CoBr2
  • cobalt(II) bromide
  • CaCl2
  • calcium chloride
  • Al2O3
  • aluminum oxide
  • CrCl3
  • chromium(III) chloride
4 2 naming binary compounds that contain only nonmetals type iii
4.2 Naming Binary Compounds that Contain only Nonmetals (Type III)
  • Type IIIcontain only NM!
  • think prefixes!
  • (note: water and ammonia are Type III but always keep their common names)
examples13
examples
  • BF3
  • boron trifluoride
  • NO
  • nitrogen monoxide
  • N2O5
  • dinitrogen pentoxide
  • PCl5
  • phosphorus pentachloride
  • SF6
  • sulfur hexafluoride
  • SO2
  • sulfur dioxide
4 4 naming compounds that contain polyatomic ions
4.4 Naming Compounds that contain Polyatomic Ions
  • There is another(!) type of compound, one that involves…
  • Polyatomic ions. Ions with more than one type of atom in it
  • gotta know Table 4.4
slide16
Notice many have O in them
  • Called oxyanions
  • Most common is called root-ate (e.g. sulfate)
    • One less O than most common?

root-ite (nitrite)

    • One less than that?

hypo-root-ite (hypochlorite)

    • One more than most common?

per-root-ate (perchlorate)

  • Must be able to recognize Polyatomic ions!!!
examples17
examples
  • Na2SO4
  • sodium sulfate
  • Fe(NO3)3
    • parentheses here mean there are 3 of what’s inside.“NO33” is nonsense!
  • iron(III) nitrate
  • Mn(OH)2
  • manganese(II) hydroxide
summary examples18
summary examples
  • Na2CO3
  • sodium carbonate
  • FeBr3
  • iron(III) bromide
  • PCl3
  • phosphorus trichloride
  • CsClO4
  • cesium perchlorate
  • CuSO4
  • copper(II) sulfate
4 5 naming acids
4.5 Naming Acids
  • Some things when dissolved in water can lose an H+ right off them
  • called acids
  • taste sour
  • know these!
  • have their ownname system…
4 6 writing formulas from names
4.6 Writing Formulas from Names
  • so far we’ve done formulas to names…
  • now we do reverse! yippee!
  • you HAVE TO KNOW all the names I warned you about!!!
examples22
examples
  • potassium hydroxide
  • KOH
  • sodium carbonate
  • Na2CO3
  • nitric acid
  • HNO3
  • calcium chloride
  • CaCl2
  • dinitrogen pentoxide
  • N2O5
  • ammonium perchlorate
  • NH4ClO4