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Developing Countries Access to Scientific Knowledge. Ian Willers CERN, Switzerland. Structure of talk. Brief introduction to CERN CERN’s relationship with different countries The experiments The computing challenge Special example of Pakistan and the CMS experiment Conclusion.

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Structure of talk
Structure of talk

  • Brief introduction to CERN

  • CERN’s relationship with different countries

  • The experiments

  • The computing challenge

  • Special example of Pakistan and the CMS experiment

  • Conclusion


Developing countries access to scientific knowledge

Twenty Member States of CERN

  • OBSERVERS:

  • UNESCO

  • EU

  • Israel

  • Turkey

  • SPECIAL OBSERVERS

  • (for LHC):

  • USA

  • Japan

  • Russia


International collaboration for lhc construction

Cost sharing for LHC (BCHF):

MS, Material: 2.1

MS, Personnel: 1.1 (approx.)

Host States: 0.2

NMS (net): 0.6 (≈15%) 4.0

International Collaboration for LHC construction

Gross NMS contributions

US: 200 M$

Russia: 100 MCHF

Japan: 170 MCHF

Canada: 30 MCHF

India: 25 M$




Developing countries access to scientific knowledge

LHC Experiments

ATLAS, CMS:

- Higgs boson(s)

- SUSY particles

- …??

ALICE:

Quark Gluon Plasma

LHC-B:

- CP violation in B



Some examples

LHC corrector magnet from India

The LHC dipole n. 360 from Novosibirsk

Some examples

CMS feet from Pakistan


Access to cern
Access to CERN

  • It may be tempting to make “ access to large facilities ” dependent on “membership”, but particle physicists has been able to follow a different approach

  • Experiments running on our facilities tend to be based on very large (50-2000 person) collaborations

  • This allows people from economically weaker countries to join with those from stronger regions

  • So we tend not to look at the passport of the people making proposals

  • But (in general) we expect people who have not funded the lab infrastructure to contribute more than their “fair share” to the cost of the experiment

  • But the contribution can take many forms, such as assembly effort, software, …look for the “win-win”


The lhc computing challenge
The LHC Computing Challenge

  • New Levels of Data Acquisition

  • New Levels Of Event Complexity

  • Enormous Quantities of Data

  • Access Worldwide


Tier 0 at cern
Tier 0 at CERN

Estimated CPU Capacity required at CERN

K SI95

5,000

Moore’s law – some measure of the capacity technology advances provide for a constant number of processors or investment

4,000

LHC

3,000

2,000

Other experiments

1,000

0

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Jan 2000:3.5K SI95


Five emerging models of networked computing from the grid
Five Emerging Models of Networked Computing From The Grid

  • Distributed Computing

    • || synchronous processing

  • High-Throughput Computing

    • || asynchronous processing

  • On-Demand Computing

    • || dynamic resources

  • Data-Intensive Computing

    • || databases

  • Collaborative Computing

    • || scientists


Developing countries access to scientific knowledge

CERN's Network in the World

267 institutes in Europe, 4603 users

208 institutes elsewhere, 1632 users

some points = several institutes



Lhc computing grid prototype service 2003 5

Tier 0

CERN

Tier 1 Centres

Brookhaven National Lab

CNAF Bologna

Fermilab

FZK Karlsruhe

IN2P3 Lyon

Rutherford Appleton Lab (UK)

University of Tokyo

CERN

Other Centres

Academica Sinica (Taipei)

Barcelona

Caltech

GSI Darmstadt

Italian Tier 2s(Torino, Milano, Legnaro)

Manno (Switzerland)

Moscow State University

NCP, NUST, Pinstech, Islamabad (soon)

NIKHEF Amsterdam

Ohio Supercomputing Centre

Sweden (NorduGrid)

Tata Institute (India)

Triumf (Canada)

UCSD

UK Tier 2s

University of Florida– Gainesville

University of Prague

……

LHC Computing Grid prototype service 2003-5



High level involvement
High Level Involvement

scientist works hard

builds up relationship

Rector

Visits

CERN

Minister

Signs

agreement

President gives

blessing


Success in particle physics collaboration some important features
Success in Particle Physics CollaborationSome Important Features

  • The Scientific Goals are of the highest importance

  • The Research requires technological advances ….. of value to all

  • The foundations lie in a network of competent institutes worldwide

  • The facilities are open to everyone but the results must be published


Summary
Summary

  • Coming together is a beginning

  • Keeping together is progress

  • Working together is success

  • CERN demonstrates successful worldwide international collaboration is possible

  • We intend to keep it that way