octomom ethical problems in the nadya suleman case
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
“ Octomom ”: Ethical Problems in the Nadya Suleman Case

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 20

“ Octomom ”: Ethical Problems in the Nadya Suleman Case - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 652 Views
  • Uploaded on

“ Octomom ”: Ethical Problems in the Nadya Suleman Case. Jan Hare, Ph.D. Human Development and Family Studies Dept. The Wild West of Medicine: Infertility Industry. Unresolved: Is infertility a disease or a misfortune? Many clinics oversell their success rates

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '“ Octomom ”: Ethical Problems in the Nadya Suleman Case' - olencia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
octomom ethical problems in the nadya suleman case
“Octomom”: Ethical Problems in the NadyaSuleman Case

Jan Hare, Ph.D.

Human Development and Family Studies Dept.

the wild west of medicine infertility industry
The Wild West of Medicine: Infertility Industry
  • Unresolved: Is infertility a disease or a misfortune?
  • Many clinics oversell their success rates
  • No centralized licensing to enforce guidelines
  • No regulation of infertility industry
  • Anything goes if patients can pay.
in vitro fertilization
In-Vitro Fertilization
  • Begin oral contraception
  • GnRH Agonist Administration
  • Ovarian Stimulation
  • Monitoring of Follicle Development
  • Final Oocyte Maturation and hCG Administration
  • TransvaginalOocyte Retrieval
  • Insemination of Oocytes
  • Embryo Transfer
  • Progesterone Supplements
  • Pregnancy Test
patients dispositional authority over leftover embryos
Patients’ “dispositional authority” over leftover embryos
  • Whether or not to freeze
  • Whether either parent can use in event of death or divorce
  • Whether their frozen embryos can be
      • discarded
      • donated to other would-be parents
      • donated to research
laws regarding practice
Laws regarding practice
  • United Kingdom: no more than 2
  • Australia: no more than 3
  • Italy: only 3 eggs fertilized in vitro for married women, all must transfer simultaneously.
  • United States: no centralized licensing, no control authorities, no laws
professional guidelines
Professional Guidelines
  • Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies (SART)
  • American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM)
  • Number of embryos transferred
  • Child-rearing ability of patient
the problems
The Problems
  • Multi-fetal pregnancy
    • Risk of poor outcome directly proportionate to number of fetuses in womb.
  • Care-giving load:
    • 168/hrs in week. 6 month old triplets require 197.5/wk of mother’s time for care.
the perfect storm
The Perfect Storm
  • Plunging national economy
  • Near bankruptcy of California
  • Fragile state of our health care system
  • Into this: the birth of octuplets in Bellflower, CA
nadya suleman
Nadya Suleman
  • Age 33
  • Single
  • 6 children via IVF (4 singletons, 1 set twins)
    • Ages 3-7, 1 child autistic
  • Unemployed, receiving public assistance
  • Living with parents – partially estranged
  • Medicaid to pay medical costs
2008 treatment
2008 treatment
  • 6 embryos thawed, transferred
  • All implanted
  • 2 split
  • Kamrava offered Suleman MFPR; she refused
  • Result: 1/26/09 birth of octuplets at 31 weeks
    • Birth weights: 1# 8oz – 3# 4 oz
west coast ivf clinic
West Coast IVF Clinic
  • Michael Kamrava
questions fall into 3 categories
Questions fall into 3 categories
  • Role of Reproductive Endocrinologists
  • Distributive Justice
  • Regulation of ART
ethical questions
Ethical Questions
  • Related to role of reproductive endocrinologists:
    • Who should make the ultimate decision regarding how many embryos to transfer?
    • Should Dr. Kamrava have accepted Ms. Suleman as a patient?
  • Related to distributive justice:
    • Who bears the cost of delivery and NICU?
    • Who bears the cost of services (sometimes lifelong) for children with special needs?
legal questions
Legal questions:
  • Do the children have a right to seek financial compensation from the fertility clinic/hospital?
  • Do the children have a right to financial compensation for any television/book deals relative to their conception, birth and lives?
in her own voice
In her own voice
  • Nadya Suleman interview with Ann Curry
ethical questions18
Ethical Questions
  • Related to role of reproductive endocrinologists:
    • Who should make the ultimate decision regarding how many embryos to transfer?
    • Should Dr. Kamrava have accepted Ms. Suleman as a patient?
  • Related to distributive justice:
    • Who bears the cost of delivery and NICU?
    • Who bears the cost of services (sometimes lifelong) for children with special needs?
arguments
Arguments
  • Adoption standard should be applied to fertility treatments.
  • Hijacking health care $ by irresponsible decisions
references
References
  • Armour, K. & Callister, L. (2005). Prevention of triplets and higher order multiples: Trends in reproductive medicine. J. Perinat Neonat Nurs, 19, 2, 103-111.
  • Kurtz, M. (2009). More than a village: Meeeting the health care needs of multiples. Hastings Center Report, 39, 3, 25-26.
  • Johnston, J. (2009). Judging Octomom. Hastings Center Report, 39, 3, 23-25.
  • Murray, T. (2008). Commentary: Are eight babies more than enough? Retrieved : http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/02/04/murray.octuplets/index.html
  • Robertson, J. (2009). The octuplet case – Why more regulation is not likely. Hastings Center Report, 39, 3, 26-28.
  • Williams, P. (2009, March 2). Eight is enough. The Nation, p. 9.
ad