slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
16.1 Properties of Solutions solubility 16.2 Concentrations of Solutions molarity, dilutions, percent solutions PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
16.1 Properties of Solutions solubility 16.2 Concentrations of Solutions molarity, dilutions, percent solutions

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 67

16.1 Properties of Solutions solubility 16.2 Concentrations of Solutions molarity, dilutions, percent solutions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 512 Views
  • Uploaded on

Ch. 16: Solutions. 16.1 Properties of Solutions solubility 16.2 Concentrations of Solutions molarity, dilutions, percent solutions 16.3 Colligative Properties of Solutions vapor-pressure lowering, freezing point depression, boiling point elevation

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

16.1 Properties of Solutions solubility 16.2 Concentrations of Solutions molarity, dilutions, percent solutions


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Ch. 16: Solutions 16.1 Properties of Solutionssolubility 16.2 Concentrations of Solutionsmolarity, dilutions, percent solutions 16.3 Colligative Properties of Solutionsvapor-pressure lowering, freezing point depression, boiling point elevation 16.4 Calculations Involving Colligative Properties (SKIP 16.4)

    2. Vocabulary 16.1– solubility, solute, solvent, solution, saturated/unsaturated/supersaturated solutions, miscible, immiscible 16.2– concentration, dilute/concentrated solutions, molarity (M), dilution, percent by volume, percent by mass 16.3– colligative property, vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression Key Formulas

    3. 16.1 Properties of Solutions A sinkhole forms when the roof of a cave weakens from being dissolved by groundwater and suddenly collapses. One recorded sinkhole swallowed a house, several other buildings, five cars, and a swimming pool! You will learn how the solution process occurs and the factors that influence the process.

    4. Solution Formation • The compositions of the solvent and the solute determine whether a substance will dissolve. The factors that determine how fast a substance dissolves are • stirring (agitation) • temperature • the surface area of the dissolving particles

    5. a) A cube of sugar in cold tea dissolves slowly.b) Granulated sugar dissolves in cold water more quickly than a sugar cube, especially with stirring. • c) Granulated sugar dissolves very quickly in hot tea.

    6. Stirring and Solution Formation • Stirring speeds up the dissolving process because fresh solvent (the water in tea) is continually brought into contact with the surface of the solute (sugar). • Temperature and Solution Formation • At higher temperatures, the kinetic energy of water molecules is greater than at lower temperatures, so they move faster. As a result, the solvent molecules collide with the surface of the sugar crystals more frequently and with more force. • Particle Size and Solution Formation • A spoonful of granulated sugar dissolves more quickly than a sugar cube because the smaller particles in granulated sugar expose a much greater surface area to the colliding water molecules.

    7. Solubility • The solubility of a substance is the amount of solute that dissolves in a given quantity of a solvent at a specified temperature and pressure to produce a saturated solution. • Solubility is often expressed in grams of solute per 100 g of solvent. • Some liquids combine in all proportions, while others don’t mix at all. • Two liquids are miscible if they dissolve in each other in all proportions. • Two liquids are immiscible if they are insoluble in each other.

    8. Solubility • A saturated solution contains the maximum amount of solute for a given quantity of solvent at a given temperature and pressure. • In a saturated solution, the rate of dissolving equals the rate of crystallization, so the total amount of dissolved solute remains constant. An unsaturated solution contains less solute than a saturated solution at a given temperature and pressure. A supersaturated solution contains more solute than it can theoretically hold at a given temperature.The crystallization of a supersaturated solution can be initiated if a very small crystal, called a seed crystal, of the solute is added.

    9. a) A supersaturated solution is clear before a seed crystal is added.b) Crystals begin to form in the solution immediately after the addition of a seed crystal.c) Excess solute crystallizes rapidly.

    10. Factors Affecting Solubility • What conditions determine the amount of solute that will dissolve in a given solvent? • Temperature affects the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent • Both temperature and pressure affect the solubility of gaseous solutes. • The mineral deposits around hot springs result from the cooling of the hot, saturated solution of minerals emerging from the spring.

    11. Solubilities can be determined by looking at tables and charts.

    12. Temperature • The solubility of most solid substances increases as the temperature of the solvent increases. • The solubilities of most gases are greater in cold water than in hot. • Pressure • Changes in pressure have little effect on the solubility of solids and liquids, but pressure strongly influences the solubility of gases. • Gas solubility increases as the partial pressure of the gas above the solution increases

    13. FYI—not required information • Henry’s law states that at a given temperature, the solubility (S) of a gas in a liquid is directly proportional to the pressure (P) of the gas above the liquid.

    14. 16. 1 Review • 1. For a given substance, which of the following will NOT influence how fast it dissolves? • a) temperature • b) amount of agitation • c) molar mass • d) size of the crystals

    15. 2. The solubility of a substance is often expressed as the number of grams of solute per • a) 100 liters of solvent. • b) 1 cm3 of solvent. • c) 100 grams of solution. • d) 100 grams of solvent.

    16. 3. The solubility of a gas in a solvent is affected by • a) both temperature and pressure. • b) only pressure. • c) only temperature. • d) both pressure and agitation.

    17. 16.2 Concentrations of Solutions • Water must be tested continually to ensure that the concentrations of contaminants do not exceed established limits. These contaminants include metals, pesticides, bacteria, and even the by-products of water treatment. You will learn how solution concentrations are calculated.

    18. The concentration of a solution is a measure of the amount of solute that is dissolved in a given quantity of solvent. • A dilute solution is one that contains a small amount of solute. • A concentrated solution contains a large amount of solute.

    19. Molarity (M) is the number of moles of solute dissolved in one liter of solution. • To calculate the molarity of a solution, divide the moles of solute by the volume of the solution.

    20. To make a 0.5-molar (0.5M) solution, first add 0.5 mol of solute to a 1-L volumetric flask half filled with distilled water. • Swirl the flask carefully to dissolve the solute. • Fill the flask with water exactly to the 1-L mark.

    21. Making Dilutions • Diluting a solution reduces the number of moles of solute per unit volume, but the total number of moles of solute in solution does not change. • The total number of moles of solute remains unchanged upon dilution, so you can write this equation. • M1 and V1 are the molarity and volume of the initial solution, and M2 and V2 are the molarity and volume of the diluted solution.

    22. Making a Dilute Solution

    23. To prepare 100 ml of 0.40M MgSO4 from a stock solution of 2.0M MgSO4, a student first measures 20 mL of the stock solution with a 20-mL pipet. • She then transfers the 20 mL to a 100-mL volumetric flask. • c) Finally she carefully adds water to the mark to make 100 mL of solution.

    24. Volume-Measuring Devices volumetric flask buret graduated cylinder pipette

    25. Percent Solutions • The concentration of a solution in percent can be expressed in two ways: as the ratio of the volume of the solute to the volume of the solution or as the ratio of the mass of the solute to the mass of the solution.

    26. Concentration in Percent (Volume/Volume) • Isopropyl alcohol (2-propanol) is sold as a 91% solution. This solution consist of 91 mL of isopropyl alcohol mixed with enough water to make 100 mL of solution.

    27. Concentration in Percent (Mass/Mass)

    28. 16.2 Review 1. To make a 1.00M aqueous solution of NaCl, 58.4 g of NaCl are dissolved in • a) 1.00 liter of water. • b) enough water to make 1.00 liter of solution • c) 1.00 kg of water. • d) 100 mL of water.

    29. 2. What mass of sodium iodide (NaI) is contained in 250 mL of a 0.500M solution? • a) 150 g • b) 75.0 g • c) 18.7 g • d) 0.50 g

    30. 3. Diluting a solution does NOT change which of the following? • a) concentration • b) volume • c) milliliters of solvent • d) moles of solute

    31. 4. In a 2000 g solution of glucose that is labeled 5.0% (m/m), the mass of water is • a) 2000 g. • b) 100 g. • c) 1995 g. • d) 1900 g.

    32. 16.3 Colligative Properties of Solutions • The wood frog is a remarkable creature because it can survive being frozen. Scientists believe that a substance in the cells of this frog acts as a natural antifreeze, which prevents the cells from freezing. You will discover how a solute can change the freezing point of a solution.

    33. Colligative Properties • A property that depends only upon the number of solute particles, and not upon their identity, is called a colligative property. • Three important colligative properties of solutions are • vapor-pressure lowering • boiling-point elevation • freezing-point depression

    34. a) In a pure solvent, equilibrium is established between the liquid and the vapor. • b) In a solution, solute particles reduce the number of free solvent particles able to escape the liquid. Equilibrium is established at a lower vapor pressure. Vapor pressure lowering--The decrease in a solution’s vapor pressure is proportional to the number of particles the solute makes in solution.

    35. a) Three moles of glucose dissolved in water produce 3 mol of particles because glucose does not dissociate. • b) Three moles of sodium chloride dissolved in water produce 6 mol of particles because each formula unit of NaCl dissociates into two ions. 3 moles Na+ and 3 moles Cl-

    36. c) Three moles of calcium chloride dissolved in water produce 9 mol of particles because each formula unit of CaCl2 dissociates into three ions. 3 moles Ca2+ and 3 moles 2 Cl- which is 3 moles Ca2+ and 6 moles Cl-

    37. Freezing-Point Depression • The difference in temperature between the freezing point of a solution and the freezing point of the pure solvent is the freezing-point depression. • The magnitude of the freezing-point depression is proportional to the number of solute particles dissolved in the solvent and does not depend upon their identity. • The freezing-point depression of aqueous solutions makes walks and driveways safer when people sprinkle salt on icy surfaces to make ice melt. The melted ice forms a solution with a lower freezing point than that of pure water.

    38. Boiling-Point Elevation • The difference in temperature between the boiling point of a solution and the boiling point of the pure solvent is the boiling-point elevation. • The same antifreeze added to automobile engines to prevent freeze-ups in winter, protects the engine from boiling over in summer. • The magnitude of the boiling-point elevation is proportional to the number of solute particles dissolved in the solvent. • The boiling point of water increases by 0.512°C for every mole of particles that the solute forms when dissolved in 1000 g of water.

    39. 16.3 Review • 1.Which of the following is NOT a colligative property of • a) vapor-pressure lowering • b) freezing-point depression • c) boiling-point elevation • d) solubility elevation

    40. 2. Choose the correct word for the space: The magnitude of each colligative property of solutions is proportional to the __________ solute dissolved in the solution. • a) type of • b) number of particles of • c) molar volume of • d) particle size of the

    41. 3. The decrease in vapor pressure when a solute is added to a liquid is due to • a) attractive forces between solvent particles. • b) repulsion of the solute particles by the solvent particles. • c) dissociation of the solvent particles. • d) attractive forces between solvent and solute particles.

    42. 4.You have 500 mL of 1M solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, Na3PO4, and Al2(SO4)3. Which solution will have the highest boiling point? • a) NaCl(aq) • b) Na2SO4(aq) • c) Na3PO4(aq) • d) Al2(SO4)3(aq)