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Infant Feeding and CACFP Recordkeeping Requirements
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  1. Infant Feeding and CACFP Recordkeeping Requirements Jill Schneeberg WI Dells CACFP Training July 19, 2011

  2. What to expect from this training. • Infant record keeping requirement • Infant meal pattern • Creditable foods • Babies developmental stages

  3. Reimbursement Requirements • Infant MUST be enrolled • Infants must be offered the CACFP • Infant Formula Notification must be completed • Infant meal records must be completed at the “point of service”

  4. Requirements for Feeding Infants • Infant meals must be offered by all child care centers • One type of iron-fortified infant formula must be offered by each center • Parent may accept or decline formula

  5. Infant Meal Notification Letter • A signed form must be on file for each child under 1 year old.

  6. Infant Meal Records • Individual infant menus are required to be completed for every meal to be claimed on the CACFP • Must be completed by at the time of the meal or snack service.

  7. Claiming Infant Meals

  8. Reimbursable meals for Birth through 3 months Infant meal/snack requires ONLY breast milk or IFIF Claim (Regardless of who supplies the IFIF)

  9. Infant Meal Pattern4-7 months old • Breakfast: • IFIF or breast milk • Iron-fortified Infant Cereal (when developmentally ready) • Lunch/Supper: • IFIF or breast milk • Iron-fortified Infant Cereal (when developmentally ready) • Fruit and/or Vegetable (when developmentally ready) • Snack: • IFIF or breast milk

  10. Reimbursable meals for 4-7 months Infant meal/snack requires ONLY breast milk or IFIF Claim (Regardless of who supplies the IFIF)

  11. 4 though 7 month old infants • Semi-solid foods are introduced when the infant is developmentally ready, which is a decision made by the parents and infant’s doctor

  12. Reimbursable meals for 4-7 month olds Parent supplies ALL components Do Not Claim Infant meal requires breast milk/IFIF, IFIC* &/or fruit/vegetable* Center supplies ONE, TWO or ALL components Claim * When developmentally ready

  13. Infant Meal Pattern8 through 11 months • Breakfast: • IFIF or breastmilk • Iron-fortified Infant Cereal • Fruit and/or vegetable • Lunch/Supper: • IFIF or breastmilk • Fruit and/or Vegetable • Iron-fortified Infant Cereal and/or • Meat/Meat Alternate • Snack: • IFIF, breastmilk, or 100% fruit juice • Bread or crackers (when developmentally ready)

  14. Reimbursable meals for 8-11 month olds Infant breakfast requires breast milk/ IFIF, IFIC & fruit/vegetable Parent supplies ALL components Do Not Claim Center supplies ONE, TWO or ALL components Claim Infant lunch requires breast milk/IFIF, fruit/vegetable & IFIC OR meat/meat alternate

  15. Reimbursable snacks for 8-11 month olds Infant snack requires breast milk or IFIF, cracker/ bread* If snack is both IFIF/breast milk and bread/cracker, the center must supply one or both components to claim If snack is only IFIF/breast milk, claim regardless of who supplies * When developmentally ready

  16. Table Foods for 8-11 month olds • Infants ages 8 through 11 months who are consuming all table foods and have a medical statement on file may be counted in the regular meal counts for the 1-12 year old children. • Individual infant menu records need not be completed for these infants. • However, the complete meal pattern must be met for each meal that is to be claimed.

  17. Reminders • Meal pattern must be met to claim meal • Food components offered must be recorded to claim meal • The center must note which food(s) are provided by center/parent

  18. Reminders • Full strength (100%) juice is reimbursable only at snack for 8 through 11 month old infants; • However, juice is NOT recommended to be served to infants under 12 months of age.

  19. Infant Meal Records • Individual infant meal records are required to be completed for every meal to be claimed on the CACFP • These are the Point of Service meal counts for infants.

  20. Infant Production Record - Birth through 3 Months Month/YearJuly 200X Classroom/Site ___Tiny Tots_____ The minimum quantity of food must be available for the infant in order to qualify for reimbursement, but may be served during a span of time consistent with the infant's eating habits 6 6 6 Circle specific item served, and record amounts offered.

  21. 1 2 2

  22. Infant Production Record - 8 Months through 11 Months Month/YearJuly 20XX Classroom/Site _________Busy Bears______________________ The minimum quantity of food must be available for the infant in order to qualify for reimbursement, but may be served during a span of time consistent with the infant’s eating habits 2 1 2 Circle and/or record specific food items served and amounts offered. * Item provided by parent

  23. Infant Production Record - 8 Months through 11 Months Month/YearJuly 20XX Classroom/Site _________Busy Bears______________________ The minimum quantity of food must be available for the infant in order to qualify for reimbursement, but may be served during a span of time consistent with the infant’s eating habits 2 2 0 Circle and/or record specific food items served and amounts offered. * Item provided by parent

  24. Reminders • Cross off any non-reimbursable meals and only claim reimbursable meals. • Total infant meal counts for the month and add into regular meal counts – preferably on bottom of Daily Participation Record.

  25. Creditable or Not creditable? • Fish Sticks? • Eggs?

  26. Creditable or Not creditable? • Combination dinners/foods, commercial baby food? • Baby food desserts?

  27. Creditable or Not creditable? • Soy formula? • Low-iron formula?

  28. Creditable or Not creditable? • Yogurt? • Cottage Cheese?

  29. Creditable or Not creditable? • Vegetable Juice? • Adult Cereals (Cheerios, Oatmeal)

  30. Infant Nutrition

  31. Infant Beverages These: • Breast milk • Iron-fortified infant formula, including soy-based formula Instead of These: • Fruit juice • Cow’s milk, lactose-free milk or nutritionally equivalent nondairy beverages such as soy or rice milk for infants less than 12 months (unless medically necessary) Dr i nk

  32. Infant Beverages • Breast milk: • Meets all nutritional needs of an infant and promotes health and development • Protects infants from many illnesses and diseases including diarrhea, respiratory disease, SIDS, allergies and ear infections • Reduces the risk of childhood obesity • Is associated with improved mental development

  33. Infant Beverages • Iron-fortified infant formula: • Is an acceptable alternative to breast milk and is specially formulated to have the right balance of nutrients • Includes iron which is a very important nutrient during the first year • Does not protect infants against illness and disease as well as breast milk

  34. Infant Beverages • Fruit juice: • Provides less nutrients and fiber than whole baby food fruits and vegetables because of what is lost when juice is processed • Drinking too much may be linked to becoming overweight or obese and is associated with tooth decay and diarrhea • Cow, lactose-free, soy and rice milk do not contain the right amounts of nutrients infants need and can harm their health

  35. How to Feed a Baby Using a Bottle • How to feed with a bottle • Hold baby & bottle during feeding • Why propping a bottle is not allowed • Choking, suffocation, ear infections, tooth decay, less cuddling & human contact • Do not let baby carry bottle around • Tooth decay, drink too much, share bottles, liquid spoil, glass bottle can break

  36. Preventing Tooth Decay • Baby bottle tooth decay or early childhood caries • Babies with teeth fall asleep with bottle in mouth • Babies who drink from bottle (or sippy cup) with juice, sweet liquid, formula for long periods

  37. Preventing Tooth Decay To prevent tooth decay: • Feed only breastmilk or formula from a bottle • No juice in bottle, only in cup; do not feed more than 4 ounces of juice/day • Bottle only at feeding time, not naps • No bottles in crib, playpen, no propping • If pacifier, only plain, nothing on it • Do not use cold bottle of juice for teething pain • Do not let baby carry around sippy cup

  38. Preventing Tooth Decay To prevent tooth decay (continued) • No water with honey, sugar, or corn syrup, soda, sweet iced tea, juice drinks, or other sweet drinks in bottle or cup • Do not feed sweet or sticky foods • Gradually shift bottle feedings to cup feedings between 6 and 12 months • Discuss cleaning baby’s teeth/gums with parents/providers

  39. Feeding Solid Foods • Do not introduce solid food and fruit juice before 4-6 months because it may lead to: • a decrease in the intake of breast milk or formula • choking, digestive problems, food allergies or intolerances

  40. Feeding Solid Foods • Do not wait to introduce solid foods later than 6 months because it may lead to: • the inability to accept different food textures • reduced motor development (e.g. chewing) • decreased nutrient intake

  41. Infant Foods THESE: • Iron-fortified infant cereal INSTEAD OF THESE: • Commercially prepared cereal mixtures (cereal with fruit) • Low-iron infant cereals • Cereals designed for older children and adults (Cheerios™) • Sweetened grains/baked goods for breakfast (e.g. donuts, cinnamon rolls, toaster pastries, muffins) • Cereals that present choking hazards EAT

  42. Type of Infant Cereal to Feed • Rice cereal is usually the best choice for the first cereal • Oat and barley cereals can be added at 1-week intervals after rice cereal • Wait to serve wheat cereal until 8 months because wheat is most likely to cause an allergic reaction

  43. Fruit/Vegetable • Offer a variety of baby food fruits and vegetables including: • Commercially prepared baby fruits and vegetables • Fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables • Canned fruits in their natural juices or water • Canned vegetables with no added salt

  44. Commercially-Prepared Vegetables and Fruits • Must list vegetable or fruit as first ingredient • Plain vegetables and fruits are preferred

  45. Commercially-Prepared Vegetables and Fruits Not creditable • Cereals, desserts, puddings listing fruit as the first ingredient • Fruit or vegetable listing water as the first ingredient