the 3 elements n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The 3 Elements. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The 3 Elements.

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 5

The 3 Elements. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 119 Views
  • Uploaded on

Social Darwinism basically, it was survival of the fittest. The weak diminished and eventually all died, and the strong got more power and continued to grow.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The 3 Elements.' - ohio


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
the 3 elements

Social Darwinism basically, it was survival of the fittest. The weak diminished and eventually all died, and the strong got more power and continued to grow.

The concept of adaptation allowed him to claim that the rich and powerful were better adapted to the social and economic climate of the time.

The 3 Elements.

Sandrine, Caitlin, Jay.

darwinism
Darwinism
  • Survival of the fittest.
  • Those that are strongest will surive.
  • Creatures will be their strongest when in their best enviroment.
  • Evolution.
  • Created by Thomas Henry Huxley 1860.
social darwinism
Social Darwinism
  • Social Darwinism basically, it was survival of the fittest. The weak diminished and eventually all died, and the strong got more power and continued to grow.
  • The concept of adaptation allowed him to claim that the rich and powerful were better adapted to the social and economic climate of the time.
the white mans burder
The White Mans Burder.
  • A poem written by Rudyard Kipling.
  • 1899
  • Imperialism
  • Questions
  • Who are the ‘new caught sullen people’?
  • -the people they conquer
  • Why are they described as ‘Half-devil and half child’?
  • Not civilized, they are not religious.
  • In the line ‘to seek another’s profit’ what is Kipling suggesting?
  • -taking what isn’t theirs, resources, what the native people could benefit from stolen.
  • In the third and fourth stanzas (verses), what do you think Kipling is suggesting about imperialism?
  • -they should stop disease and famine but they are bringing no good, disease, paving roads and such, bringing their people over, leaving their dead people there.
  • What do you think Kipling means by the phrase ‘white man’s burden’?
  • -obligation to conquer.
the poem
The Poem
  • Take up the White Man's burden--Send forth the best ye breed--Go bind your sons to exileTo serve your captives' need;To wait in heavy harness,On fluttered folk and wild--Your new-caught, sullen peoples,Half-devil and half-child.Take up the White Man's burden--In patience to abide,To veil the threat of terrorAnd check the show of pride;By open speech and simple,An hundred times made plainTo seek another's profit,And work another's gain.Take up the White Man's burden--The savage wars of peace--Fill full the mouth of FamineAnd bid the sickness cease;And when your goal is nearestThe end for others sought,Watch sloth and heathen FollyBring all your hopes to nought.Take up the White Man's burden--No tawdry rule of kings,But toil of serf and sweeper--The tale of common things.The ports ye shall not enter,The roads ye shall not tread,Go mark them with your living,And mark them with your dead.
  • Take up the White Man's burden--And reap his old reward:The blame of those ye better,The hate of those ye guard--The cry of hosts ye humour(Ah, slowly!) toward the light:--"Why brought he us from bondage,Our loved Egyptian night?"Take up the White Man's burden--Ye dare not stoop to less--Nor call too loud on FreedomTo cloke (1) your weariness;By all ye cry or whisper,By all ye leave or do,The silent, sullen peoplesShall weigh your gods and you.Take up the White Man's burden--Have done with childish days--The lightly proferredlaurel, (2)The easy, ungrudged praise.Comes now, to search your manhoodThrough all the thankless yearsCold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,The judgment of your peers!